Alliance for Equality of Blind Canadians (AEBC) Restaurant Survey

Posted Feb 27, 2012

The Toronto Chapter of the AEBC is conducting a nationwide survey to find out from you what “accessibility” features are important to you when dining out. The results of this survey will affect AEBC’s work nationally.

All responses will be kept anonymous, and will be used for the purposes of gathering information to present to various major restaurant chains.

Take the Survey at http://www.blindcanadians.ca/participate/chapters/toronto/restaurant-survey

Cut Frustrate Disabled

ACCESSIBILITY: Council chopped a $500,000 contribution to a reserve fund for upgrades
By Jordan Adams, Special to The Free Press
Last Updated: February 23, 2012 8:02am

The new wheelchair ramp at London city hall has made life a bit easier for Jeff Preston. He no longer has to drive over rough pavement in his wheelchair to get to his committee meetings. It’s improvements like these that make the city more accessible to disabled citizens.

City not compliant on transit access

Tue Feb 21, 2012
Judi Mansfield-Jones, Hamilton

On Wednesday, my daughter Kristin and I presented a petition to City Hall on behalf of the Developmental Services Transportation Committee. The petition supports equal access to DARTS for all disabled adults.

In 2008, council passed a motion to revise the eligibility criteria for DARTS to comply with Human Rights and Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act regulations for implementing a fair and equitable transportation system for all Hamiltonians. To date, access to DARTS remains restricted and not available to all disabled adults.

Human Rights Review Bypasses Thunder Bay

Organizers cite lack of interest
CBC News Posted: Feb 20, 2012

An advocacy group is upset Andrew Pinto, the head of an Ontario Human Rights review, is bypassing Thunder Bay. (Pinto Wray James LLP)

A lawyer has been appointed by the Attorney-General to consult the public and visit cities across the province for feedback about the way human rights are enforced.

Use These Helpful Tips for Making a Presentation to the Pinto Human Rights Code’s Public Hearings or Sending in Written Submissions

AND SEND US FEEDBACK ON OUR DRAFT BRIEF TO THE PINTO HUMAN RIGHTS CODE REVIEW

February 9, 2012

SUMMARY

It can be easy to give the Pinto Human Rights Review your feedback on Ontario’s system for enforcing human rights. The Pinto Human Rights Code Review is going ahead with its public hearings next week. This is so even though we asked it to postpone these, so more people can learn about them and take part. The Pinto Review is seeking the public’s feedback on how well Ontario’s system for enforcing human rights is working.

EnAbling Change Program

Posted Feb 9, 2012
Ontario’s EnAbling Change Program is not the same as the Government of Canada’s Enabling Accessibility Fund.

We do not provide funding for building renovations such as ramps, lifts or elevators.

Ontario is looking for non-profit organizations that want to be leaders in helping others meet the requirements of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005.

More Problems With Pinto Human Rights Review

PINTO REVIEW BELATEDLY SETS TIMES AND LOCATIONS FOR PUBLIC FORUMS, WRONGLY CANCELS THUNDER BAY FORUM AND FINALLY EXTENDS DEADLINE TO SIGN UP FOR A STAKEHOLDER MEETING — GIVE US FEEDBACK ON OUR DRAFT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR OUR BRIEF TO THE PINTO REVIEW

February 7, 2012

SUMMARY

Editorial: Shocking Discrimination Case Needs Sorting Out”

Monday, February 06, 2012 | Written by Glenn Kauth | |

There’s a shocking legal matter that needs sorting out involving a group of workers with developmental disabilities in St. Catharines, Ont., who, according to allegations put to the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario, earned $1.25 an hour or less for 10 years.

Accommodating Bipolar Disorder in the Workplace, Part I: Disclosure and Stigma

Published January 28, 2012 | By Daniel Bader, Ph.D.

Bipolar disorder, as well as being a mental illness, is also a disability. It is protected in the United States under the Americans With Disabilities Act, while in Canada it is protected under provincial Human Rights Acts. Employers are not only obliged to ignore bipolar disorder when considering hiring decisions, but they are obliged to provide what are called “reasonable accommodations” for people with bipolar disorder. In other words, they are obliged to take up to moderately difficult, active steps in order to ensure that people with bipolar disorder are able to perform their jobs.

Just-Released Human Rights Legal Support Centre 2009-2010 Annual Report Documents That the Centre Warned McGuinty Government it Couldn’t Provide Appropriate Level of Service From 2008-2010

AND MORE NEWS ON UNANSWERED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE PINTO HUMAN RIGHTS REVIEW

February 1, 2012

SUMMARY

Here is the latest news on the Independent Review of the McGuinty Government’s 2006 privatization of the enforcement of human rights in Ontario under Bill 107: