Taxi Ruling a Black Mark for Justice

Times Colonist
October 11, 2017
Re: “Victoria guide-dog owner loses discrimination suit over taxi ride,” Oct. 7.

Silly me. All this time, I have believed that our justice system was based on proof.

At no time in the Graeme McCreath/Victoria Taxi case – I was present throughout both the human-rights tribunal and the
Supreme Court hearings – was any “proof” of driver allergy presented. At the original rights hearing, the driver in question
was absent (“unavailable”) and the Victoria Taxi manager neither produced nor was asked to produce medical documentation for his driver. The transcript doesn’t mention it, either.

Win the war on talent: Hire people with disabilities

10 Oct 2017
by Ingrid Muschta and Joe Dale

In this second part of a five-part series, experts from the Ontario Disability Employment Network explain why HR should tap this talent pool.

Accessibility Advocates Looking to Expand the Scope of the StopGap Program in the City

‘If you have to ask then it is not accessible’
By Jonathan Juha, Postmedia News
Saturday, October 7, 2017
From left to right, Cindy Walker, Sean Beech and their children, Theodore and Hendrik; UPS employee Ron Musselman; and Roger Koert, chair of the city’s accessibility advisory committee. They are all supporters and beneficiaries of the StopGap initiative and would like to see it expand, so participating businesses leave the ramps outside during business hours.

Will the Massive New Courthouse that The Wynne Government Is Planning for the Heart of Downtown Toronto Have Sufficient Disability Accessibility?

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities

October 6, 2017

SUMMARY

Many think any new building built in Ontario must be fully accessible for people with disabilities. Sadly, neither the Ontario Building Code nor the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act ensures this. To the contrary, new buildings are now built in Ontario, even with public money, that lack proper accessibility.

How an Ottawa Cancer Patient is Trying to Make CHEO More Accessible for Everyone

Bruce Deachman, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: October 6, 2017

Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario(CHEO) CEO Alex Munter and leukemia patient Sarah Telford.

Just before the elevator doors opened at CHEO, Sarah Telford playfully, but pointedly, picked up a nearby yellow caution cone the kind that warn of wet floors, spills and whatnot and placed it in front of the elevator. When the doors opened, the elevator’s lone occupant, hospital CEO Alex Munter, was compelled to negotiate his way around the obstacle as he exited, no small feat considering that he was in a wheelchair.

Daniels Leads Industry in Accessible Housing

Accessibility Designed Program creates inclusive living spaces for people using mobility devices

TORONTO, Oct. 3, 2017 /CNW/ – The Daniels Corporation announced a new program offering condominium suites designed specifically for purchasers who use mobility devices. Called ‘Accessibility Designed Program’ (ADP), suites within this innovative program will exceed Ontario Building Code (OBC) requirements by including features such as roll-out/low-threshold balconies with a swing door and large roll-in showers with mosaic tile flooring as standard, at no extra cost.

Exploring a $55-Billion Untapped Market

RichDONOVAN
Special to The Globe and Mail
September 29, 2017

CEO and founder of Return on Disability.

Canadian business has struggled since 1989 to hire people with disabilities in any material numbers. This is not a uniquely Canadian phenomenon. The experience has been repeated globally by millions of companies.

This struggle is rooted in knee-jerk reactions to regulation and can be avoided by doing what business does best: understanding and serving a new market a big new market.

Additional Regulation Isn’t Necessary to Resolve the Issue of Fake Service Animals

James A. Kutsch, Jr. PhD
President and CEO, The Seeing Eye
Originally posted October 5, 2016
Editors Note: While this article refers to the US it can easily be applied in Canada.

News stories across the nation continue to report an increase in the number of people who pretend that their pet dog is a service animal. The major concern stems from the unruly behavior of these supposed service animals, and how their presence jeopardizes the safety and access rights of legitimate service animal teams.