You are Browsing the Category education

Levelling the Playing Field

The role of accommodations in academia
By: Hillary Jones, Contributor
Posted on October 16, 2017

Lakehead, like all other universities and businesses in Ontario, is required to comply with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). If you’ve had a job in Ontario at any point in your life, you’ve likely been told about the AODA along with other standard workplace trainings like WHMIS. When you’re sitting through these often monotonous training days, it can be easy to lose sight of the relevance of these policies to our daily lives. However, as midterm season is upon us, one university policy relating to the AODA may become more prominent: accommodations.

A seriously Flawed Human Rights Tribunal Decision Rules Against the Request of a Nine Year Old Boy with Autism Spectrum Disorder to Bring His Autism Service Dog to School

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities http://www.aodaalliance.org aodafeedback@gmail.com Twitter: @aodaalliance

September 25, 2017

SUMMARY

Here is yet another compelling reason why Ontario needs to enact a strong and effective Education Accessibility Standard under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act to tear down the many unfair disability accessibility barriers that impede students with disabilities in Ontario’s education system. Almost ten months ago, Premier Wynne promised to create an Education Accessibility Standard. Almost 10 months later, no Standards Development Committee has been appointed to start to work on it.

New Stanford Course Tackles Designing for People With Disabilities

A new course teaches undergraduates how to design for people with physical disabilities. Each week, students learn about a different disability, then brainstorm design ideas to address issues and present their work to the class.

By Sarah Derouin

Students in a new undergraduate course have this question to ponder: How would it feel to be a bright person with big goals and ideas, but live in a world that’s not designed for you?

If Inclusion Means Everyone, Why Not Me?

ARCH Disability Law Centre, in partnership with Community Living Ontario, Inclusive Education Canada, the University of Western Ontario, and Brock University, is announcing the launch of new research titled “If Inclusion Means Everyone, Why Not Me?”.

We are currently conducting a survey on the experiences of students with intellectual disabilities in Ontario’s public school system. The focus of this survey is on many of the current practices and barriers related to inclusive education.

Course Cluster Challenges Thinking on Disability

Professor Julia Watts Belser teaches a course on the intersection of disability and religion in the Georgetown University Disability Studies Course Cluster September 14, 2016

The Georgetown University Disabilities Studies Course Cluster is thriving in its second year, with seven classes offered this fall. Its a broad and important field, but it isnt exactly in the academic mainstream yet. So, what is disability studies, and how did this course cluster come to fruition?

The Canadian Union of Public Employees Ontario Calls On the Wynne Government to Agree to Create an Education Accessibility Standard Under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities

August 23, 2016

SUMMARY

Yet another major voice has joined our call for the Wynne Government to agree to develop an Education Accessibility Standard under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act. On August 10, 2016, the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) Ontario wrote Ontario’s new Accessibility Minister, Tracy MacCharles, to support our request that the Ontario Government create an Education Accessibility Standard. This new accessibility standard is needed to tear down the many barriers that impede students with disabilities in Ontario’s education system.