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New Website Answers ‘Where’s My Bus?’

By GORD YOUNG, The Nugget
Friday, September 30, 2016 8:56:40 EDT AM

There will be no more uncertainty at the bus stop for North Bay transit users who may be wondering if they missed their ride.

The city launched a real-time bus tracking website Thursday that will put an end to the guessing game for those who rely on city transit.

“Today, we are very pleased to be launching My Ride NBT, a new real-time web-based application that helps riders determine the arrival and departure times of their bus,” said Coun. Mark King, during the official launch of the new site at the city’s transit terminal on Oak Street. “This application will eliminate the age-old question, ‘where’s my bus?'”

The website at includes real-time GPS data from all transit buses. The website adapts to most screen sizes and can be used on smartphones, tablets and desktop computers. Key features include the ability to pinpoint when your next bus will arrive, locate where the bus is along the route, plus the ability to receive push notifications about service disruptions and route changes. All city bus stops have been posted with a number that passengers can use to obtain real-time information from the site. They can also search using a GPS map, route name or number.

The city also unveiled a new automated vehicle location and next stop annunciation system Thursday. The announcement included a bus ride for members of the media to showcase the enhancements, which are pegged at a little more than $430,000.

At every bus stop riders waiting to board will hear an audible message announcing the route name, while, inside the bus, riders will hear the next approaching bus stop and will see the stop name displayed. They may even recognized the voice as that of Moose FM’s Mike Monaghan.

“The enhancements we are unveiling today meet the needs of all of our riders students, seniors, those with disabilities,” said King, chairman of council’s community services committee.

The new system allows city transit to meet provincial accessibility requirements under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA).

The act was adopted in 2005, with the goal of making Ontario fully accessible by 2025. The legislation is being phased in with standards for customer service, transportation, environment and communications.

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