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A Guide to the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation (IASR)

Note: Latest amendments, December 22, 2012 Amending O. Reg. 191/11

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Table of Contents

Introduction

Part 1 – General Requirements

The General Requirements are those regulatory requirements that apply across all three standards in this regulation – Information and Communications, Employment, and Transportation.

Requirements under the Information and Communications Standard

Section 1: Purpose of the Regulation
Integrated Accessibility Standard
Ontario Human Rights Code
Section 2: Definitions
Definitions
Section 3: Establishment of Accessibility Policies
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Statement of Commitment
Accessibility Policies
Developing an Accessibility Policy
Customer Service Standard Principles
Content and Format of Policies
Documentation of Policies
Availability of Policies
Maintaining Accessibility Policies
Section 4: Accessibility Plans
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Accessibility Plans
Developing a Multi-year Accessibility Plan
Assessing the Organization
Drafting a Multi-Year Accessibility Plan
Making an Accessibility Plan Public
Reviewing and Updating the Accessibility Plan
Additional Requirements for Transportation Service Providers
Additional Requirements for Designated Public Sector Organizations
Consulting with People with Disabilities
Preparing an Annual Public Status Update
Section 5: Procuring or Acquiring Goods, Services or Facilities
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Accessibility Features and Criteria
Determining Practicability
Section 6: Self-Service Kiosks
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Section 7: Training
Requirement as Stated in Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Who Should Receive Training
Training Based on Duties
Training Formats and Methods
Timing of Training
Record of Training
Information for Educators and Transportation Service Providers
Section 8: Exemption from Filing Accessibility Reports
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations Have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement

Part 2 – Information and Communications Standard

The Information and Communications Standard outlines requirements for organizations to create, provide and receive
information and communications in ways that are accessible for people with disabilities. This should help people with disabilities access sources of information and communications that many of us rely on every day.

For example, it will help people with vision loss access more websites using their screen readers, expand large print and digital collections in public libraries and provide students with course information and learning materials in accessible formats.

Accessibility benefits everyone. Making accessibility a part of the way organizations send and receive information and
communications will help business tap into opportunities to attract more customers, build customer loyalty and improve services. Reaching out to customers with disabilities may enable business to tap into $9.6 billion more in revenue.

Requirements under the Information and Communications Standard

Section 9: Definitions and Exceptions
Application of Exception
Section 10: Application
Application
Section 11: Feedback
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Receiving and Responding to Feedback
Feedback from the Public
Feedback from Employees
Customer Service Standard Feedback Requirement
Creating an Accessible Feedback Process
Accessible Formats and Communication Supports
Section 12: Accessible Formats and Communication Supports
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
the Requirement
About Accessible Formats and Communication Supports
Consulting with the Person Making the Request
Unconvertible Information
Meeting Requests in a Timely Manner
Providing Information at No Additional Cost
Public
Notification
Section 13: Emergency Procedures, Plans or Public Safety Information
Requirement as stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing this Requirement
What is Emergency and Public Safety Information?
What is “As Soon As Practicable?”
Current Practices for Emergency Plans
Section 14: Accessible Websites and Web Content
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement Terminology
What is WCAG?
What does Level A and Level AA mean?
What does new website and content mean?
What does practicable mean?
Website Information Posted Prior to 2012
Website Information Posted After 2012
Availability of Commercial Software and Tools
Technological Capability
Projects Planned Prior to January 1, 2012
Staggered Timelines for Compliance
Section 15: Educational and Training Resources and Materials
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of the Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Notification of Need
Resources and Materials
Student Records and Program Information
Section 16: Training to Educators
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Accessibility Awareness Training
Training Record
Relationship with General Training Requirement
Section 17: Producers of Educational or Training Material
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Unconvertible Information
Section 18: Libraries of Educational and Training Institutions
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Availability of Information
Unconvertible Information
Section 19: Public Libraries
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Special Collections, Rare Books and Archival Materials
Notification

Part 3 – Employment Standard

The Employment Standard, under the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation, requires employers to provide for accessibility across all stages of the employment life cycle.

By pro-actively removing barriers across the employment life cycle, employers can help to create workplaces that are accessible and which allow employees to reach their full potential.

The Employment Standard applies to paid employees. This includes, but is not limited to, full-time, part-time, paid apprenticeships and seasonal employment. As good business practice, employers may apply the Standard to unpaid staff, volunteers and other forms of unpaid work.

The Employment Standard is a framework for integrating accessibility into regular workplace processes. Accessibility
benefits everyone. Accessible employment processes mean that employers can access an untapped pool of talent. By providing
accessible opportunities in the labour market, Ontario’s employment income may increase by $618 million.

Requirements under the Employment Standard

Section 20: Scope and Interpretation
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Section 21: Schedule
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Section 22: Recruitment General
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Section 23: Recruitment, Assessment Or Selection Process
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Section 24: Notice to Successful Applicants
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Section 25: Informing Employees of Supports
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Section 26: Accessible Formats and Communication Supports For Employees
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Workplace Information
Documenting Accessible Formats and Communications Supports
Section 27: Workplace Emergency Response Information
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
When to Provide Individual Workplace Emergency Response
Information
Developing Individual Workplace Emergency Response Information
When an Employee Needs Assistance
Reviewing Individualized Workplace Emergency Response
Information
Documenting Individualized Workplace Emergency Response
Information
Section 28: Documented Individual Accommodation Plans
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Developing Individual Accommodation Plans
Why Reviews are Required
Additional Information for Individual Accommodation Plans
Section 29: Return to Work Process
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Section 30: Performance Management
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
What is Performance Management?
Section 31: Career Development and Advancement
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Career Development and Advancement and Individual Accommodation
Plans
Section 32: Redeployment
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Redeployment and Individual Accommodation Plans

Part 4 – Transportation Standard

The requirements in the Transportation Standard will help transportation providers as well as municipalities, universities, colleges, hospitals and school boards make their services and vehicles accessible to people with disabilities.

Accessibility benefits everyone. Accessible transportation services will assist people with disabilities in being able to live, work and participate in their communities. It will not only assist persons with disabilities living in Ontario, but visitors, families with strollers, and seniors.

Requirements under the Transportation Standard

The Accessible Transportation Standard has 47 sections, which fall into seven categories.

Section 33: Definitions
Definitions
Section 34: Availability of Information On Accessibility Equipment
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Accessible Formats
Section 35: Non-Functioning Accessibility Equipment
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Section 36: Accessibility Training
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Training Schedule
Training Records
Content
Safe use of equipment
Barriers to accessibility or failure of accessibility equipment
Procedures for emergencies
Section 37: Emergency Preparedness and Response Policies
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Developing Policies
Availability to Public
Section 38: Fares, Support Persons
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
No Fare Charged
Demonstrating the Need for a Support Person
Giving the Designation
Section 39: Transition “- Existing Contracts
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Section 40: Transition “- Existing Vehicles
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
No Retrofit Requirement
Requirements Regarding Modifications/Upgrades
Exemption
Structural Integrity
Section 41: Accessibility Plans “- Conventional Transportation Services
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations Have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Customer Feedback
Public Meetings
Providers of both Conventional and Specialized Services
Other Accessibility Plan Requirements
Section 42: Accessibility Plans “- Specialized Transportation Services
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Estimating Demand
Reducing Waiting Times
Other Accessibility Plan Requirements
Section 43: Accessibility Plans “- Conventional And Specialized Transportation Services
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Other Accessibility Plan Requirements
Section 44: General Responsibilities
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Using Ramps, Bridge Plates and Lifts
Providing Adequate Time
Safe Storage of Mobility Aids and Mobility Assistive Devices
Allowing Medical Aids
Ensuring Safety
Providing Accessible Information
Section 45: Alternative Accessible Method of Transportation
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Alternative Accessible Method of Transportation
Exemptions
Section 46: Fares
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Fares
Accessible Fare Payment Options
Section 47: Transit Stops
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Who Decides
What vehicles
Barriers
Section 48: Storage of Mobility Aids And Mobility Assistive Devices
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing this Requirement
Storage in Passenger Compartments
Storing in Baggage Compartments
Charging Fees
Section 49: Courtesy Seating
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Clearly Marked Seating
Location
Communications Strategy
Section 50: Service Disruptions
Requirement as stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Route Changes Known in Advance
Accessible Information
Section 51: Pre-Boarding Announcements
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirements
Verbal Requirements
Electronic Requirements
Section 52: On-Board Announcements
Requirement as stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Verbal Requirements
Electronic Requirements

Conventional Transportation Service Providers – Technical Requirements

Sections 53 – 62 relate to the technical requirements for vehicles regulated under the Accessible Transportation Standard.

Section 53: Grab Bars, Handholds, Handrails, Stanchions
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
The Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Exemptions
Structural Integrity
Vehicles Regulated under Ontario Regulation 629
Section 54: Floors and Carpeted Surfaces
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Floor surfaces
Carpeted Surfaces
Exemption
Vehicles Regulated under Ontario Regulation 629
Section 55: Allocated Mobility Aid Spaces
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Location
Dimensions
Mobility Aid Securement Devices
Use by Other Passengers
Exemptions
Structural Integrity
Vehicles Regulated under Ontario Regulation 629
Section 56: Stop Requests and Emergency Response Controls
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing this Requirement
Location
Accessible Control Standards
Auditory and Visual Indicators
Location
Colour Contrast
Tactile Information
Section 57: Lighting Features
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Lighting Requirements
Ground Level Lighting
Protecting from Glare
Exemptions
Structural Integrity
Vehicles Regulated under Ontario Regulation 629
Section 58: Signage
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Signage Information
Signage Requirements and Characteristics
Signage must include all of the following components:
Section 59: Lifting Devices, Ramps, or Portable Bridge Plates
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
The Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Lifting Device, Ramp, Portable Bridge Plate Requirements
Exemption
Vehicles Regulated under Ontario Regulation 629
Section 60: Steps
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
The Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Edging
Surfaces
Heights and Depths
Exemption
Vehicles Regulated under Ontario Regulation 629
Section 61: Indicators and Alarms
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Warning Indicators and Alarms
Warning Lamps
Warning Alarms
Using the Lights and Alarms
Exemptions
Structural Integrity
Vehicles Regulated under Ontario Regulation 629
Section 62: Rail Cars
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Mobility Aid Accessible Rail Car
Accessible Washroom
Exemption
Structural Integrity
Section 63: Categories of Eligibility
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Categories of Eligibility
Unconditional Eligibility
Temporary Eligibility
Conditional Eligibility
Offering Consistency
Denying Requests
Section 64: Eligibility Application Process
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Application Waiting Period
Providing Accessible Formats
Re-assessing Eligibility
Appealing the Process
Deciding within 30 days
Upholding the original decision
Collecting Personal Information
Section 65: Emergency or Compassionate Grounds
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Applying for Emergency or Compassion Grounds
Collecting Personal Information
Section 66: Fare Parity
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Providing Fare Parity
Same provider
Different providers
Structuring Fares
Paying Fares
Section 67: Visitors
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Eligibility for Service
Developing Criteria for Visitors
Collecting Personal Information
Section 68: Origin to Destination Services
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Origin to Destination
Example of “feeder” service
Using what is available and accessible
Section 69: Coordinated Service
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Coordinated Stops and Drop Off Locations
Section 70: Hours of Service
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Separate Transportation Service Providers
One Specialized Transportation Provider for Several
Municipalities
Same Transportation Service Provider
Section 71: Bookings
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Same Day Service
Next Day Services and Advance Bookings
Accessible Booking
Section 72: Trip Restrictions
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
No Restrictions on Requests for Trips
No Unreasonable Policies or Practices
Reasonable Limits on Use of Services
Section 73: Service Delays
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Purpose of Notification
Defining a Service Delay
Examples
Unexpected delays
Predictable delays
Communicating a Delay
Section 74: Companions and Children
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Travelling with Companions
Travelling with Dependent Children
Section 75: School Transportation
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Providing Accessible Transportation
Alternative Accessible Transportation
Providing Transportation Supports
Identification of Students with Disabilities
Developing Individual School Transportation Plans
Roles and Responsibilities
Definitions
Section 76: Public Sector Organizations
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Definitions
Accessible Transportation Services
Section 77: Ferries
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement Federal Code of Practice Requirements
Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation Requirements
Section 78: Duties of Municipalities – General
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Consultation
Planning for Accessible Bus Stops and Shelters
Third Party Contracts
Section 79: Duties of Municipalities “- Accessible Taxicabs
Requirement as Stated in the Regulation
Intent of this Requirement
When do Organizations have to Comply
Implementing the Requirement
Consultation
Progress and Steps
Section 80: Duties of Municipalities “- Taxicabs
Requirement as Stated in Regulation
The Intent of this Requirement
Implementing the Requirement
Fees and Fares
Taxicab Information
Information on Bumpers
Information for Passengers
Appendix A
Glossary
Purpose
Terms and definitions

Introduction

In 2005, the Ontario Government passed the Accessibility for
Ontarians with Disabilities Act to make Ontario accessible by
2025.

Accessibility standards have been created as part of theAccessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act. These standards are rules that businesses and organizations in Ontario need to follow to identify, remove and prevent barriers so that people with disabilities have more opportunities to participate in everyday life.

The Accessibility Standard for Customer Service was the first
standard to become law.

The next three standards -Information and Communications, Employment, and Transportation –
have been combined under one regulation, the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation. This regulation is now law and
the requirements currently in regulation are being phased in between 2011 and 2021.

An accessibility standard for the built environment (buildings and outdoor spaces) is in development and is not yet law.

Why Accessibility? It’s Just Good Business

  • By 2031, over 6 million people in Ontario will be either living
    with a disability or be 55 years of age and over, accounting for 40% of all income
  • As boomers age, it is expected that they will drive society to meet their needs and demands
  • This is a huge demographic that cannot be ignored
  • By learning how to serve people with disabilities, businesses may attract more customers, build customer loyalty and improve their services for everyone
  • With the aging population, consumers are increasingly represented by the disability community
  • Ontario businesses need to market to and develop products for people with disabilities in order to compete and succeed
  • But, beyond being good for business – it’s just the right thing to do

Accessibility Benefits Everyone

  • Accessibility not only helps people with disabilities, it also benefits:
    • seniors
    • families travelling with young children
    • shoppers
    • visitors with luggage

Affected Businesses and Organizations

The Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation applies to all Ontario organizations that provide goods, services or facilities to the public or to other organizations and have at least one employee.

The regulation divides organizations into five categories.

  • Government of Ontario and the Legislative Assembly
  • Large designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees
  • Small designated public sector organizations with 1- 49 employees
  • Large organizations (private and not-for-profit) with 50+ employees
  • Small organizations (private and not-for-profit) with 1-49 employees

An organization’s requirements and timelines for compliance depend on which of these classes it falls under.

How to Read this Guide

The guide is divided into five parts based on the parts of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation.

  • Part 1 General Requirements
  • Part 2 Information and Communications Standard Requirements
  • Part 3 Employment Standard Requirements
  • Part 4 Transportation Standard Requirements

It is recommended that all organizations read Parts 1, 2, 3.

Part 4 only applies to organizations providing transportation services.

Each part is divided into sections matching the section number in the regulation. Each section is a requirement of the regulation. In some cases a section addresses an exemption to certain organizations (e.g., Part 1, section 8). In others it provides information relevant to the regulation (e.g., Part 1, section 1).

The guide also includes a Glossary (Appendix A) .

This guide is intended to be read as a companion to, and in conjunction with, the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation (Ontario Regulation 191/11).

Section 1: Purpose of the Regulation

Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation

The Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation establishes accessibility standards and introduces requirements for Information and Communications, Employment and Transportation. The Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation also establishes the compliance framework for obligated organizations.

The Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation applies to all public, private and not-for-profit organizations, with at least one employee.

Ontario Human Rights Code

Organizations have current and ongoing obligations under the Ontario Human Rights Code respecting non-discrimination. The Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation does not replace or affect existing legal obligations under the Ontario Human Rights Code and other laws in respect to accommodation of people with disabilities. Organizations must comply with both pieces of legislation.

The Ontario Human Rights Code and the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act both deal with accessibility, but are two very different pieces of legislation. The Ontario Human Rights Code is an individual, complaints-based legislation that addresses discrimination. The Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation, created under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, applies to all organizations in Ontario and will increase accessibility for all.

The Ontario Human Rights Code requires organizations to accommodate people with disabilities to the point of undue
hardship.

The Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation does not replace or affect legal rights or obligations that arise under the Ontario Human Rights Code and other laws relating to the accommodation of people with disabilities. This means that the Ontario Human Rights Code or other applicable legislation may require additional accommodation measures that go beyond or are different from the standards established by the regulations of the AODA.

Section 2: Definitions

The terms identified and defined below are intended to provide assistance in understanding and implementing the requirements outlined in the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation.

accessible formats -formats that are an
alternative to standard print and are accessible to people with disabilities. Accessible formats may include large print, Braille, and audio electronic formats such as DVDs, CDs.

communication supports -supports that individuals with disabilities may need to access information. Some
examples include plain language formats, sign language, as well as reading out loud, captioning, or using written notes to
communicate.

designated public sector organization – refers to organizations listed in Schedule 1 of the Integrated
Accessibility Standards Regulation (Broader Public Sector). These
organizations include hospitals, universities, colleges of applied arts and technology, district school boards and organizations that provide public transportation such as municipalities. Hereafter, also referred to as “public sector”
in these guidelines.

Designated public sector organization also means every municipality and every person or organization listed in Column 1 of Table 1 of Ontario Regulation 146/10.

Government of Ontario -refers to the executive of the government and operational branches, including
every ministry of the Government of Ontario and the Office of the Premier.

large designated public sector organization – refers to designated public sector organizations with 50 or more
employees. Hereafter, also referred to as “large public sector” in these guidelines.

large organization -refers to a private or not-for-profit organization that provides goods, services or
facilities to the public, or to other organizations, and has 50 or more employees in Ontario. See obligated organizations below. It does not include the Government of Ontario, Legislative Assembly, or designated public sector organizations. Large organizations are hereafter also referred to as “large private or not-for-profit organization” in these guidelines.

Legislative Assembly -refers to the offices of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario including all the offices of
members of the provincial parliament (MPPs), their constituency
offices in their ridings and the offices of those appointed on the address of the assembly, such as the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.

obligated organization -refers to the Government of Ontario, Legislative Assembly and designated public
sector organizations, as well as the large and small organizations to which the standards of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation apply.

small designated public sector organization – refers to designated public sector organizations with at least one employee but fewer than 50 employees, to which the standards of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation apply. Hereafter, also referred to as “small public sector” in these guidelines.

small organization -refers to a private or not-for-profit organization that provides goods, services or
facilities to the public, or to other organizations, and has at least one but fewer than 50 employees in Ontario. See obligated organizations above. It does not include the Government of Ontario, Legislative Assembly, or designated public sector organizations. Small organizations are hereafter, also referred to as “small private or not-for-profit
organization” in these guidelines.

Section 3: Establishment of Accessibility Policies

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

3 (1) Every obligated organization shall develop, implement and maintain policies governing how the organization achieves or will achieve accessibility through meeting its requirements under the accessibility standards referred to in this Regulation.

(2) Obligated organizations, other than small organizations, shall include a statement of organizational commitment to meet the accessibility needs of persons with disabilities in a timely manner in their policies.

(3) The Government of Ontario, the Legislative Assembly, every designated public sector organization and large organizations shall,

a) prepare one or more written documents describing its policies; and

b) make the documents publicly available, and shall provide them in an accessible format upon request.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all organizations establish policies on how they will meet their obligations under the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation.

When do Organizations have to Comply

  • Ontario Government andLegislative Assembly January 1, 2012 Designated public sector
  • organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2014
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015

Implementing the Requirement

Statement of Commitment

All public sector organizations, as well as private and not-for-profit organizations with 50 or more employees must develop a statement of commitment.

Private and not-for-profit organizations with 49 or fewer employees are not required to develop a statement of
commitment.

A statement of commitment establishes the vision and the goals for an organization. It is an important first step in the development of accessibility policies as it gives an organization purpose, clarity and direction.

Organizations must make their statement of commitment publicly available. This can be done in a number of ways, including posting it on the premises, such as on a bulletin board in a public area, or on the company website.

Organizations must also provide their statement of commitment in an accessible format on request. For example, a person with low vision may request the statement of commitment in large print.

Accessibility Policies

A policy is a formal organizational rule or principle to guide decisions and to achieve outcomes. A policy does not normally address how this rule or principle will be achieved.

Organizations must establish accessibility policies describing what they do, or intend to do, to meet the requirements of the regulation.

The statement of commitment described earlier establishes a goal for an organization to work towards. An accessibility policy states what rules or principles an organization will put in place to support achieving its accessibility goal(s).

Developing an Accessibility Policy

Customer Service Standard Principles

Under the Accessibility Standards for Customer Service, organizations are required to use reasonable efforts to make their policies consistent with the following principles:

  • dignity
  • independence
  • integration, except when alternate measures are necessary to meet the needs of people with disabilities
  • equal opportunity

Organizations may consider these principles to guide them in developing policies under the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation and in fostering accessibility generally.

For more information on these principles, please see the Accessibility Standard for Customer Service: Employer Handbook

Content and Format of Policies

Organizations have the flexibility to create accessibility policies that best fit their existing organizational culture and business practices. They may choose to have one policy or a series of policies on accessibility. They may also choose to integrate the accessibility policy or policies into existing policies.

Organizations are only required to develop policies on the requirements that apply to their business.

For example, a grocery store or a print shop would not need to develop policies required under the Transportation Standard since they are not a transportation service provider.

Documentation of Policies

Public sector, as well as private and not-for-profit organizations with 50 or more employees must document their
policies in writing.

Private and not-for-profit sector organizations with 49 or fewer employees are not required to put their policies in writing.

If an organization has existing written policies or codes of practice, a best practice may be to integrate their accessibility requirements within these existing documents for consistency purposes.

For example, an organization may already have in place human resources policies on recruitment or performance management. Instead of developing separate policies on accessible recruitment and performance management, principles of accessibility can be incorporated into existing policies.

Availability of Policies

  • Public sector organizations, as well as private and not-for-profit organizations with 50 or more employees must make their accessibility policies available to the public.
  • Organizations have the flexibility to meet this requirement in a way that considers their existing business practices. For example, organizations may post information about their accessibility policies on their premises, such as on a bulletin
    board in a public area, on their website or through other reasonable methods so that the public is aware the information is available.
  • Organizations must also provide a copy of their policies to any person who requests one. As well, the copy must be provided in an accessible format , if required.
  • Organizations must provide accessible formats of their accessibility policies to their employees. Organizations have the flexibility to determine how best to provide this information to an employee.

Maintaining Accessibility Policies

All obligated organizations must develop, implement and maintain their accessibility policies. Policies are living documents and should be reviewed and updated regularly to reflect current practices of the organization.

Section 4: Accessibility Plans

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

4 (1) The Government of Ontario, Legislative Assembly, designated public sector organizations and large organizations
shall,

  • a) establish, implement, maintain and document a multi-year accessibility plan, which outlines the
    organization’s strategy to prevent and remove barriers and meet its requirements under this Regulation;
  • b) post the accessibility plan on their website, if any, and provide the plan in an accessible format upon request; and
  • c) review and update the accessibility plan at least once every five years.

(2) The Government of Ontario, Legislative Assembly and designated public sector organizations shall establish, review and update their accessibility plans in consultation with persons with disabilities and, if they have established an accessibility advisory committee, they shall consult with the committee.

(3) The Government of Ontario, Legislative Assembly and
designated public sector organizations shall,

  • a) prepare an annual status report on the progress of measures taken to implement the strategy referenced in clause (1)(a); and
  • b) post the status report on their website, if any, and provide the report in an accessible format upon request.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that obligated organizations develop a multi-year accessibility plan, outlining their strategies to prevent and remove barriers to accessibility. Once developed, organizations must maintain their accessibility plan.

When do Organizations have to Comply

  • Ontario Government andLegislative Assembly January 1, 2012
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1- 49 employees January 1, 2014
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 49 or fewer employees are not required to prepare multi-year accessibility plans.

Implementing the Requirement

Accessibility Plans

An accessibility plan describes the actions an organization will take to prevent and remove barriers, and when it will do so.

An accessibility plan creates a road map for an organization to increase accessibility. It puts into action an
organization’s commitment to accessibility (refer to the statement of commitment), and its accessibility
policies.

Developing a Multi-year Accessibility Plan

Assessing the Organization

An assessment will help an organization determine where it currently stands with respect to accessibility for people with disabilities. An assessment will help determine what specific steps the organization needs to take to increase accessibility and how it can reach the goals in its accessibility policy.

The assessment will help an organization to better understand its readiness to meet its accessibility requirements. Further, an assessment will assist in developing an effective plan to prevent and remove barriers to accessibility.

An assessment could include a variety of existing organizational practices, such as business, operational, human resources, customer service, and others.

In order to get a broad perspective of existing barriers to accessibility within their organization, organizations could seek feedback from employees, clients, customers and people with disabilities.

Drafting a Multi-Year Accessibility Plan

The requirements under the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation are being phased-in over several years to allow organizations the time they need to incorporate accessibility into their regular business practices.

In their multi-year accessibility plan, organizations can document the short and long-term requirements they need to
meet.

The multi-year accessibility plan lays out how organizations will accomplish the following:

  • meet their accessibility requirements within required timelines specified in the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation
  • address any current accessibility barriers
  • prevent and remove future barriers

As well, when the accessibility plan is updated, organizations can highlight what they have accomplished and how they have successfully met the requirements in the regulation.

Making an Accessibility Plan Public

Organizations that are required to develop an accessibility plan must post a copy on their website, if they have one, and/or provide a copy to any person who requests one. Posting accessibility plans publicly gives organizations the opportunity to communicate their strategy for meeting accessibility, and sets expectations for the public.

Organizations must provide the plan in an accessible format, if requested.

Reviewing and Updating the Accessibility Plan

Accessibility plans are living documents. Organizations must review and update their plan every five years.

By updating their plan every five years, organizations can determine if they are on-track for meeting their requirements, highlight accomplishments that have been made, and make any adjustments needed in order to meet the timelines under the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation.

Organizations have five years from their compliance dates to review and update their plan. For example, designated public sector organizations with 50 or more employees must have their initial plans developed by January 1, 2013, and review and update their plans by January 1, 2018.

Additional Requirements for Transportation Service Providers

Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers have additional accessibility plan requirements outlined under the Accessible Transportation Standard .

Additional Requirements for Designated Public Sector Organizations

Consulting with People with Disabilities

In developing, reviewing and updating their accessibility plans, all designated public sector organizations must consult with people with disabilities.

If the organization has an accessibility advisory committee, this committee must also be included in the consultation process.

Consultations provide people with disabilities with an opportunity to participate and provide valuable feedback that
should help organizations maintain an awareness of people’s accessibility needs.

Preparing an Annual Public Status Update

All designated public sector organizations must prepare annual public status updates on the progress of the measures they have taken to implement the strategies referred to in their accessibility plans.

These updates are not required to be submitted to government. They are distinct from the accessibility compliance reports that obligated organizations are required to file to indicate their compliance with the regulation.

In these updates, organizations can announce measures that they have put in place to reduce barriers to accessibility and to keep the public informed of their progress.

All designated public sector organizations must make their annual status update available to the public by posting it on their website, if they have one, and providing the update in accessible format , upon request.

Section 5: Procuring or Acquiring Goods, Services, or Facilities

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

5(1) The Government of Ontario, Legislative Assembly and designated public sector organizations shall incorporate
accessibility criteria and features when procuring or acquiring goods, services or facilities, except where it is not practicable to do so.

(2) If the Government of Ontario, Legislative Assembly or a designated public sector organization determines that it is not practicable to incorporate accessibility criteria and features when procuring or acquiring goods, services or facilities, it shall provide, upon request, an explanation.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all designated public sector organizations incorporate accessibility criteria and features into their procurement practices so that goods, services, and facilities are more accessible to people with disabilities, unless it is not practicable to do so.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement only applies to the Government of Ontario, the Legislative Assembly and designated public sector organizations

Affected Organization Compliance Dates

  • Government of Ontario and Legislative Assembly January 1, 2012
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 201
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2014

Implementing the Requirement

Accessibility Features and Criteria

Accessibility features and criteria must be considered and incorporated, where possible.

Features

Accessibility features include technical features (e.g., software), and structural features (e.g., physical design,
including hardware or product specifications).

Criteria

Organizations make decisions on what goods, services, or facilities they procure based on different criteria.

For example, they may consider quality, cost and delivery terms. Additionally, some organizations may consider environmental or
manufacturing criteria, i.e., more value is placed on products that meet green initiatives or are made-in-Ontario products. Another
criterion that could be included is accessibility training . This may be important for organizations when hiring another organization
to provide services for them.

Accessibility must be incorporated into an organization’s process for procuring or
acquiring goods, services or facilities except when it is not practical to do so.

Determining Practicability

Factors relevant to practicability may include:

  • availability of accessible goods, services or facilities
  • technological compatibility between older products and newer ones being procured

When requested, an organization must provide an explanation as to why it did not incorporate accessibility criteria and features
when procuring goods, services, or facilities. The explanation must be provided in an accessible format or with appropriate
communications supports, if necessary.

For more detailed information go to the Information and Communications Standard, Section 12 “Accessible Formats and Communications Supports”

Section 6: Self-Service Kiosks

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

6(1) Without limiting the generality of section 5, the Government of Ontario, Legislative Assembly and designated public
sector organizations shall incorporate accessibility features when designing, procuring or acquiring self-service kiosks.

(2) Large organizations and small organizations shall have regard to the accessibility for persons with disabilities when
designing, procuring or acquiring self-service kiosks.

(3) The Government of Ontario, Legislative Assembly and designated public sector organizations shall meet the requirements
of this section in accordance with the schedule set out in subsection 5 (3).

(4) Large organizations shall meet the requirements under subsection (2) as of January 1, 2014 and small organizations shall
meet the requirements as of January 1, 2015.

(5) In this section, “kiosk” means an interactive electronic terminal, including a point-sale
device, intended for public use that allows users to access one or more services or products or both.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all organizations that offer services and/or products through self-service kiosks take
steps to make them accessible, on a go forward-basis, to people with disabilities so they can be used independently and
securely.

When do Organizations have to Comply

  • Ontario Government and Legislative Assembly January 1, 2012
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2014
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015

The requirements are different for designated public sector organizations and private and not-for-profit organizations (see “Implementing the Requirement ” below)

Implementing the Requirement

About Self-Service Kiosks

In this requirement, kiosk is used to describe an interactive electronic terminal including a point-of-sale device that the
public can use to access one or more services or products, or both.

People use self-service kiosks for various purposes including paying for fares and parking, as well as for validating tickets and
checking prices. Kiosks are also used as self-service checkouts in many retail stores today.

Most self-service kiosks allow people to complete transactions through point-of-sale devices using a debit, credit or other
electronic funds card.

Example: A self-serve kiosk that uses touch-screen technology may be difficult, or impossible, to use for people who are blind or
have low-vision unless an alternate (non-visual) mode of operation, such as an accessible tactile keyboard, is made available.

Self-Service Kiosks Accessibility Features

When determining what accessibility features can be included in the design or purchase of a kiosk, organizations may consider technical features, structural features, and the access path to the kiosk.

Technical features – includes the colour contrast on the display screen and the options to increase font size, as well as allowing for extra time to complete tasks. Other technical features include voice activating equipment and visual and non-visual modes of operation, etc.

Structural features -includes the height and stability of the kiosk, headset jacks with volume control, and
specialized keypads or keyboards, etc.

Access path -includes reach ranges for people using mobility aids, the proximity of the kiosk to other
objects, etc.

Regulatory Requirement for Designated Public Sector Organizations

The Ontario Government, Legislative Assembly, and all designated public sector organizations are required to incorporate
accessibility features into their kiosks.

Under this requirement, “to incorporate” means that organizations must implement
accessibility features into the kiosks. While the requirement does not specify what features should be built-into the design or purchase requirements for the kiosk, public sector organizations should consider the needs of all their customers and clients to make them accessible to the widest range of users.

Regulatory Requirement for Private and Not-for-Profit Organizations

All private and not-for profit organizations are required to have regard to accessibility features for their kiosks.

Under this requirement, “have regard to”means that organizations must consider what
accessibility features they could build-into their kiosks to best meet the needs of their customers and clients. Organizations should strive to include accessibility features where possible, and consider the accessibility needs, preferences and abilities of the widest range of users.

Section 7: Training

Requirement as Stated in Regulation

7(1) Every obligated organization shall ensure that training is provided on the requirements of the accessibility standards
referred to in this Regulation and on the Human Rights Code as it pertains to persons with disabilities to,

  • (a) all employees, and volunteers;
  • (b) all persons who participate in developing the organization’s policies; and
  • (c) all other persons who provide goods, services or facilities on behalf of the organization.

(2) The training on the requirements of the accessibility standards and on the Human Rights Code referred to in
subsection

  • (1) shall be appropriate to the duties of the employees, volunteers and other persons.
  • (3) Every person referred to in subsection (1) shall be trained as soon as practicable.
  • (4) Every obligated organization shall provide training in respect of any changes to the policies described in section 3 on an
    ongoing basis.
  • (5) The Government of Ontario, the Legislative Assembly, every designated public sector organization and every large organization
    shall keep a record of the training provided under this section, including the dates on which the training is provided and the
    number of individuals to whom it is provided.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all organizations train employees, volunteers, all those who participate in developing the
organization’s policies, and all others who provide goods or services on behalf of the organization, about the
requirements in the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation, as well as the Ontario Human Rights Code as it relates to people
with disabilities.

When do Organizations have to Comply

  • Ontario Government and Legislative Assembly January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2016

Implementing the Requirement

Organizations must provide training on the requirements in the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation and on the
disability-related obligations under the Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code).

The training should include information about achieving accessibility by 2025 and highlight the requirements of the three standards “Information and Communication, Employment, and Transportation “in the
regulation as they apply to the organization’s business.

As well, organizations must understand their requirements under the Code and the differences between the Code and Integrated
Accessibility Standards Regulation, and provide training accordingly.

Please follow this link to more information about the Code as it
relates to people with disabilities
.

Who Should Receive the Training

The training must be provided to:

  • All employees and volunteers, including paid and unpaid positions
  • Anyone who participates in developing the organization’s policies, which might include
    managers, senior leaders, boards of directors, business owners and independent operating regulated professionals
  • Anyone who provides goods, services or facilities on behalf of the organization, which might include outsourced services, such as
    payroll, facilities management and contact centres.

Training Based on Duties

Individuals should be trained as needed to perform the duties of their jobs. It is therefore important to assess the requirements
in the regulation against the roles or duties of the person or people within the organization.

Job descriptions, if used, are a good place to start when determining what information a person should receive in a training
session, considering at the same time what the person does in practice on a regular basis.

Organizations have flexibility to determine how best to provide the training. An organization may determine one training session is
appropriate for various employees even though they perform different duties, e.g., hostess, busser, server, and bartender. In
other situations, the training may vary. For example, a human resources manager will need different training than a cashier in
the same organization.

Training Formats and Methods

Organizations have the flexibility to determine the best training method for their organization.

Training can be provided in a variety of ways. It can be a separate training program or included as part of an orientation
session or a larger training program.

The training can also be delivered in different formats such as handouts or PowerPoint presentations at orientation sessions, or
staff meetings, or as on-line training modules.

Timing of Training

In addition to meeting the initial timelines requirement, organizations are required to provide training on an ongoing basis,
such as when new employees join organizations, or when their accessibility policies change.

For example, some organizations have standardized training schedules. This allows them to build accessibility training into
their regular training schedules, and train within existing business practices.

Record of Training

All organizations, with the exception of private and not-for-profit organizations with 49 or fewer employees, must keep
records of the number of individuals who were trained, and the dates that the training was provided.

Information for Educators and Transportation Service Providers

In addition to the general training requirement set out in this section, educators and transportation service providers have additional training requirements.

For more information on accessibility training for educators, please see Information and Communications Standard, Section 16, “Training to Educators”.

For more information on accessibility training for transportation service providers, please see Transportation
Standard, Section 36, “Accessibility Training “.

Section 8: Exemption from Filing Accessibility Reports

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

8(1) Small organizations are exempted from the requirement to file accessibility reports under section 14 of the Act with respect to the accessibility standards in this Regulation.

(2) The following are the reasons for the exemption:

  • It is consistent with a phased approach to implementing the Act.
  • It allows the exempted obligated organizations to focus their efforts and resources on complying with the accessibility
    standards.

Intent of this Requirement

Organizations with fewer than 49 employees are exempt from the requirement to file accessibility reports.

This exemption reduces the regulatory burden for small organizations and allows them to focus their efforts and resources on complying with the accessibility standards and achieving results.

When do Organizations Have to Comply

This exemption applies to private and not-for profit organizations with 1-49 employees.

Implementing the Requirement

All organizations with one or more employees must comply with requirements in the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act.

Under section 14 of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, organizations are required to file annual
accessibility reports outlining the organizations’progress towards becoming
accessible for people with disabilities.

This regulation exempts small organizations, those with 1 “49 employees, from filing accessibility reports.

These organizations, however, may be required to submit compliance-related information or other reports, and they may be subjected to compliance audits or inspections.

The government will continue to help small organizations comply with the regulation and become accessible by providing tools,
resources and education materials.

Section 9: Definitions and Exceptions

The terms and exceptions identified below are intended to provide assistance in understanding and implementing the
requirements outlined in the Information and Communications Standard.

Definitions

communications -the term communications as it used in the Information and Communications Standard refers to
the interaction between two or more people or entities when information is provided, sent or received.

conversion ready -refers to an electronic or digital format that assists conversion into an accessible format such as Braille, large print, audio cassettes, CDs, DVDs, etc.

information -the term information as it is used in the Information and Communications Standard refers to
knowledge, data and facts that convey meaning and that exist in any format such as text, audio, digital or images.

Exceptions

These exceptions apply to all requirements within the Information and Communications Standard.

The Information and Communications Standard does not apply to the following:

  • Products and product labels, except as specifically provided by this Part.
  • Unconvertible information or communications.
  • Information that the obligated organization does not control directly or indirectly through a contractual relationship, except
    as required under sections 15 and 18.

If an obligated organization determines that information or communications are unconvertible, the organization must provide the
person requesting the information or communication with:

  • an explanation as to why the information or communications are unconvertible; and
  • a summary of the unconvertible information or communications.

For the purposes of the Information and Communications Standard, information or communications are unconvertible if,

  • it is not technically feasible to convert the information or communications; or
  • the technology to convert the information or communications is not readily available.

Application of Exception

The Information and Communications Standard requires people and organizations to provide accessible information and communications
about the goods, services or facilities offered to customers, clients and others.

It is not about making products, e.g., cold medicine, DVDs, etc. and/or labels on the packaging of these products, accessible.

In the examples of cold medicine or DVDs, a drugstore would have to find accessible ways to inform customers about the cold medicine
available on the shelves and how to safely use it. A video store would have to find accessible ways to inform customers about their
DVD selection.

Education and training institutions (as defined in the regulation ) and their libraries, as well as producers of education
and training materials and public libraries need to refer to their specific parts of the regulation (sections 15, 17, 18 and 19) to
understand their obligations in terms of products.

The standard applies to information or communications an organization can directly control, meaning information an
organization creates, owns or where a contractual relationship with a third party provider allows for modification. If an organization
has control over the information or communications, they would have to convert it into an accessible format or provide it with
appropriate communication supports, upon request.

For more information on accessible formats and communication supports, please see Information and Communications Standard, Section 12, “Accessible Formats and Communication Supports”.

Section 10: Application

Under the Information and Communications Standard, the following sections apply to all obligated organizations:

  • Definitions and exceptions
  • Feedback
  • Accessible formats and communication supports
  • Emergency procedure, plans or public safety information

Section 11: Feedback

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

11(1) Every obligated organization that has processes for receiving and responding to feedback shall ensure that the
processes are accessible to persons with disabilities by providing or arranging for accessible formats and communications supports,
upon request.

(2) Nothing in this section detracts from the obligations imposed under section 7 of Ontario Regulation 429/07 (Accessibility
Standards for Customer Service) made under the Act.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all organizations with a process(es) for receiving and responding to feedback make them
available to people with disabilities in accessible formats or with appropriate communication supports, on request.

Note: The regulation only applies to organizations that have processes for receiving and responding to feedback. Organizations
that do not have processes are not required to create such processes.

When do Organizations have to Comply

  • Ontario Government and Legislative Assembly January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2016

Implementing the Requirement

Receiving and Responding to Feedback

Many organizations have external and/or internal processes in place to receive and respond to feedback from their clients, customers or employees. Those organizations that have processes in place to receive and respond to feedback must make them accessible
to individuals with disabilities, on request.

Note: The regulation does not require organizations to create feedback processes if they do not currently use one. Here are some of the ways organizations receive and respond to feedback.

Feedback from the Public

There are many different ways for organizations to get feedback from the public, including the following methods:

  • Follow-up phone surveys, e.g., after customers purchase new vehicles, the dealership calls them to ask if they are satisfied with their purchase.
  • On-line questionnaires, e.g., a retail store sends its customers a survey asking them about their shopping habits and the types of stores they frequently visit.
  • Cards to complete, e.g., after finishing their meals at a restaurant, customers are given comment cards to rate the quality of their experience.

Feedback from Employees

Many organizations have established feedback processes for employees to comment on their experience in the workplace. Larger organizations may use web-based surveys or emails to collect feedback, while smaller organizations may choose to meet and talk with their employees or provide them printed evaluation forms to complete.

Customer Service Standard Feedback Requirement

Under the Customer Service Standard, obligated organizations must establish a customer service feedback process for receiving and responding to feedback specifically about the manner in which they provide accessible goods or services to people with disabilities.

Obligated organizations must also make the information about their feedback processes available to the public. The processes must allow for feedback in a variety of ways including in person, by telephone, by writing or via email. The processes must also
specify the actions that the organizations are required to take when complaints are received.

Obligated organizations need to comply with this requirement within the timelines specified in the Accessibility Standards for Customer Service .

Creating an Accessible Feedback Process

Providing accessible feedback processes may mean that instead of only one method for feedback, such as hand-written letters, organizations will need to be prepared to receive feedback in other ways such as over the telephone or by email, if requested.

When organizations provide customers with questionnaires or
comment cards, they will also be required to provide the information in accessible formats or with the appropriate communication supports, on request.

Example: Some stores and workplaces have comment cards on which customers and employees can leave comments. These may be inaccessible to some people. If an individual requests an accessible way to offer feedback, the organization will have to develop another acceptable method such as verbal (over the telephone) or electronic (email) feedback.

Note: Lessons learned from implementing the accessible Customer Service feedback process may be applicable to increasing accessibility in all feedback processes the organization may have.

Accessible Formats and Communication Supports

When making their feedback processes accessible, organizations are required to meet the requirements of Information and
Communications Standard, Section 12 – “Accessible Formats and Communications Supports”. This section includes a list of accessible formats and communication supports.

Section 12: Accessible Formats and Communication Supports

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

12(1) Except as otherwise provided, every obligated organization shall upon request provide or arrange for the provision of accessible formats and communication supports for persons with disabilities,

  • in a timely manner that takes into account the person’s accessibility needs due to disability; and
  • at a cost that is no more than the regular cost charged to other persons.

(2) The obligated organization shall consult with the person making the request in determining the suitability of an accessible format or communication support.

(3) Every obligated organization shall notify the public about the availability of accessible formats and communication
supports.

(4) Every obligated organization that is required to provide accessible formats or accessible formats and communication supports by section 3, 4, 11, 13, 19, 26, 28, 34, 37, 44 or 64 shall meet the requirements of subsections (1) and (2) but shall do so in accordance with the schedule set out in the referenced section and shall do so only to the extent that the requirements in subsections (1) and (2) are applicable to the requirements set out in the referenced section.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all organizations provide information and communicate in an accessible manner about their goods, services or facilities to people with disabilities, on request.

The information must be provided in a timely manner and at a cost that is no more than the regular price charged to others.

Organizations are not required to make products and/or product labels accessible. Please refer to Section 9 – “Application of Exception”for more information.

When do Organizations have to Comply

  • Government of Ontario and Legislative Assembly January 1, 2014
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2015
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2016
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2016
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2017

Implementing the Requirement

About Accessible Formats and Communication Supports

Some people use methods other than standard print to access information. Some communicate in ways other than the spoken word.

Alternatives to standard print are often referred to as “accessible formats”, and methods to
assist communication are referred to as “communication supports”.

To be accessible to people with disabilities, organizations must be able to provide and to receive information and communications in an accessible manner.

There are many ways to do this, here are some examples:

  • accessible electronic formats such as HTML and MS Word
  • Braille
  • accessible audio formats
  • large print
  • text transcripts of visual and audio information
  • reading the written information aloud to the person directly
  • exchanging hand-written notes (or providing a note taker or communication assistant)
  • captioning or audio description
  • assistive listening systems
  • augmentative and alternative communication methods and strategies such as the use of letter, word or picture boards, and devices that speak out messages
  • sign language interpretation and intervenor services
  • repeating, clarifying, or restating information

The requirement only applies to information and communications that an organization controls directly or indirectly through contractual relationships. The requirement does not apply to information one organization may be sharing on behalf of another organization.

Example: A hotel has information about its own facilities and also displays pamphlets on behalf of other organizations, such as local restaurants, in its lobby. The hotel is required to provide information about its own facilities in accessible formats. It is not required to provide the information about the restaurants (or the information from any other organization over which it does not have direct or indirect control of) in accessible formats.

Note: In the example above, the organization has obligations under the Customer Service Regulation to provide accessible customer service. For example, the hotel might ask staff to tell people with visual disabilities about the information contained in the pamphlets.

Consulting with the Person Making the Request

When an individual requests an accessible format or communication support, organizations are required to consult with
the person to determine their accessibility needs. Consultation is important to make sure the appropriate support is provided, for example not all persons who are blind use Braille.

Once this is established, the regulation gives organizations the flexibility to decide on the most appropriate accessible format or communication supports, given the needs of the person and the organizations’ capability to deliver.

Example: A customer with a visual disability is unable to read a small retail store’s written return policy. The
store is required to work with the customer to determine an acceptable way of providing this information, based on the
individual’s needs and the capacity of the store to deliver certain formats and supports. In this situation, it may
be acceptable for a store clerk to read out the store’s return policy to the customer with a
visual disability.

Unconvertible Information

Some forms of information may be difficult or impossible to convert into an accessible format. For example, the visual
information in an x-ray or architectural blue-print may be lost in the conversion processes, or an organization may not have access to the technologies that convert documents into accessible formats.

Organizations will need to determine, in consultation with the person requesting the information or communications, if it is possible to provide it in an accessible format or with appropriate communication supports.

If an organization determines they are unable to convert the information or communications into an accessible format, they will need to explain to the person why they are unable to do so and provide a summary of the content.

Example: A customer with a disability has requested that a document containing complex charts is provided in an accessible format. The organization can convert the text in the document into an accessible format and provide it to the person; however they are unable to convert the information contained in the charts. The organization must let the person know why the charts couldn’t be converted into an accessible format and then provide a summary of the information in the charts.

Meeting Requests in a Timely Manner

Organizations are not required to have all types of formats or supports on hand or in stock. However, organizations must provide formats and supports in a timely manner.

In some cases, organizations will be able to provide the information or communications quickly. In other cases organizations may need more time for a variety of reasons, such as the availability of the format requested, the complexity and amount of information being provided, and the resources and internal capacity of the organization.

The regulation does not specify how quickly an organization should provide accessible formats or communication supports; however being prepared, where possible, will better enable organizations to respond to requests. Organizations have the flexibility to determine “timely manner”based on their ability to deliver the requested
accessible format or communication support.

For example, when organizations have documents available in accessible electronic formats such as HTML or MS Word, it is easier to convert these documents to other formats such as Braille. These accessible electronic formats are also compatible with screen reading software. This means organizations can likely respond to requests quickly by emailing the documents to individuals with disabilities to use with their own assistive technology.

Providing Information at No Additional Cost

If an organization charges the public fees for the documents, it cannot charge higher fees for the same documents provided in accessible formats. Similarly, if an organization does not charge fees for documents, then it cannot charge fees for accessible formats of the documents.

Public Notification

Organizations are required to notify the public about the availability of accessible formats and communication supports. The information can be posted on their premises, such as on bulletin boards in public areas, on their website, or through other reasonable methods.

Section 13: Emergency Procedures, Plans or Public Safety Information

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

13(1) In addition to its obligations under section 12, if an obligated organization prepares emergency procedures, plans or public safety information and makes the information available to the public, the obligated organization shall provide the information in an accessible format or with appropriate communication supports, as soon as practicable, upon request.

(2) Obligated organizations that prepare emergency procedures, plans or public safety information and make the information available to the public shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2012.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that publicly available emergency and public safety information is provided in an
accessible format or with appropriate communication supports, on request.

Organizations are not required to develop or create new emergency or public safety information. Further, organizations are not required to convert this information into accessible formats or provide communication supports if they do not share the information publicly. Some organizations have confidential internal plans, such as those for security lockdowns that are not shared publicly.

However, organizations may have requirements under the Accessible Employment Standard to provide individualized emergency information to its employees. For more detailed information, go to the Employment Standard, Section 27 “Workplace Emergency Response Information”.

When do Organizations have to Comply

  • Government of Ontario and Legislative Assembly January 1, 2012
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2012
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2012
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2012
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2012

This requirement applies to all organizations that prepare public emergency procedures, plans or public safety information and that make them available to the public.

Implementing this Requirement

Providing emergency and public safety plans in accessible formats or with communications supports, should enable people with disabilities to be prepared in case there is an emergency situation.

What is Emergency and Public Safety Information?

Prepared emergency and public safety information refers to the emergency plans and procedures that organizations develop before an emergency occurs.

This may include evacuation procedures and floor plans, information about alarms or information about other incidents that may threaten life, property, operations or the environment.

It does not include real-time emergency or real-time public safety information, e.g., a fire evacuation, or an emergency at a
large public gathering.

Note: The Fire Code, a regulation made under the Fire Protection and Prevention Act, requires that evacuation procedures include
provisions for people requiring assistance.

What is “As Soon As Practicable?”

As soon as practicable means as soon as possible given all of the circumstances after a person with a disability asks for the
information in an accessible format or with communication supports.

Although organizations are not required to have accessible formats on hand, they should recognize the critical nature of
emergency and public safety information.

Some people with a disability may need more time to plan for emergency situations; organizations should respond promptly to
requests for this type of information.

For example: When booking rooms at a hotel, several individuals with disabilities ask for its fire evacuation procedures in
accessible formats. The hotel consults with these individuals to learn what they need and provides the information when they arrive at the hotel. By doing so, the hotel gives its guests with disabilities the information in a timely manner and in formats that
allow them to understand the evacuation procedures.

When providing emergency and public safety information in an accessible format or with appropriate communication supports, organizations are required to meet the requirements of the Information and Communications Standard, Section 12 “Accessible Formats and Communications Supports”.

For more information on accessible formats and communication supports, please go to the Glossary , which gives a general description. For more detailed information go to Information and Communications Standard, Section 12 “Accessible Formats and Communications Supports”.

Current Practices for Emergency Plans

Many organizations are legally required to share prepared emergency and public safety information with the public.

For example, the Fire Code requires some property owners to post their procedures for fire related emergencies in public places.
These procedures are based on the types of buildings and the number of occupants permitted in them.

Many public sector organizations are required, under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, to have publicly
shared emergency plans for a variety of events such as outbreaks of influenza and severe weather such as tornadoes and ice storms.

In some situations, organizations may not be legally required to share emergency and/or public safety information with the public
but may choose to do so. For example, organizations may develop and implement emergency plans for blackouts and share the information
with their customers or clients. Others may prepare emergency plans for chemical spills or natural disasters, such as earthquakes or
floods.

Furthermore, the role of some organizations includes sharing public safety information. Police and fire departments share
strategies for public safety and fire prevention with members of their communities. Similarly, medical offices often share public
health information with patients.

Section 14: Accessible Websites and Web Content

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

14(1) The Government of Ontario and the Legislative Assembly shall make their internet and intranet websites and web content conform with the World Wide Web Consortium Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, at Level AA, and shall do so in accordance with the schedule set out in this section.

(2) Designated public sector organizations and large organizations shall make their internet websites and web content
conform with the World Wide Web Consortium Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG)2.0, initially at Level A and
increasing to Level AA, and shall do so in accordance with the schedule set out in this section.

(3) The Government of Ontario and the Legislative Assembly, for both their internet and intranet sites, shall meet the requirements in this section in accordance with the following schedule:

By January 1, 2012, new internet and intranet websites and web content on those sites must conform with WCAG 2.0 Level AA, other than,

  • success criteria 1.2.4 Captions (Live), and
  • success criteria 1.2.5 Audio Descriptions (Pre-recorded).

By January 1, 2016, all internet websites and web content must conform with WCAG 2.0 Level AA other than,

  • success criteria 1.2.4 Captions (Live), and
  • success criteria 1.2.5 Audio Descriptions (Pre-recorded).

By January 1, 2020, all internet and intranet websites and web content must conform with WCAG 2.0 Level AA.

(4) Designated public sector organizations and large organizations for their internet websites shall meet the
requirements of this section in accordance with the following schedule:

  • By January 1, 2014, new internet websites and web content on those sites must conform with WCAG 2.0 Level A.
  • By January 1, 2021, all internet websites and web content must conform with WCAG 2.0 Level AA, other than,
    • success criteria 1.2.4 Captions (Live), and
    • success criteria 1.2.5 Audio Descriptions (Pre-recorded).

(5) Except where meeting the requirement is not practicable, this section applies, to websites and web content, including web-based applications, that an organization controls directly or through a contractual relationship that allows for modification of the product; and to web content published on a website after January 1, 2012.

(6) In determining whether meeting the requirements of this section is not practicable, organizations referenced in subsections (1) and (2) may consider, among other things,

  • the availability of commercial software or tools or both; and
  • significant impact on an implementation timeline that is planned or initiated before January 1, 2012.

(7) In this section,

“extranet website”means a controlled extension of the intranet, or internal network of an
organization to outside users over the Internet; (“French”)

“internet website”means a collection of related web pages, images, videos or other digital
assets that are addressed relative to a common Uniform Resource Identifier (URI)and is accessible to the public; (“French”)

“intranet website”means an organization’s internal website that is used to
privately and securely share any part of the organization’s information or operational
systems within the organization and includes extranet websites; (“French”)

“new internet website”means either a website with a new domain name or a website with an
existing domain name undergoing a significant refresh; (“French”)

“new intranet website”means either an intranet website with a new domain name or an intranet
website with an existing domain name undergoing a significant refresh; (“French”)

“Web Content Accessibility Guidelines”means the World Wide Web Consortium Recommendation, dated December 2008, entitled “Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0”;(“French”)

“web page”means a non-embedded resource obtained from a single Uniform Resource Identifier
(URI)using Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP)and any other resources that are used in the rendering or intended to be rendered together with it by a user agent. (“French”)

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that the Government of Ontario, the Legislative Assembly, designated public sector
organizations, as well as private and not-for-profit organizations with more than 50 employees make their websites accessible to people with disabilities by conforming to international standards for website accessibility.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Private and not-for profit organizations with 49 or fewer employees do not have obligations under this requirement.

Government of Ontario and Legislative Assembly

January 1, 2012

New internet and intranet websites and web content on those sites must conform with WCAG 2.0 Level AA other than,

  • success criteria 1.2.4 Captions (Live)
  • success criteria 1.2.5 Audio Descriptions (Pre-recorded).

January 1, 2016

All internet websites and web content must conform with WCAG 2.0 Level AA other than,

  • success criteria 1.2.4 Captions (Live)
  • success criteria 1.2.5 Audio Descriptions (Pre-recorded).

January 1, 2020

All internet and intranet websites and web content must conform with WCAG 2.0 Level AA.

Designated public sector organizations, as well as private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014

New internet websites and web content on those sites must conform with WCAG 2.0 Level A.

January 1, 2021

All internet websites and web content must conform with WCAG 2.0 Level AA, other than,

  • success criteria 1.2.4 Captions (Live)
  • success criteria 1.2.5 Audio Descriptions (Pre-recorded).

Implementing the Requirement

All obligated organizations’ websites, and the content on those websites, must conform with WCAG 2.0. This
requirement applies to new websites first, and then over the next several years to all websites.

Many organizations control their websites and web content, including web-based applications, either directly or through a contractual relationship. That is, they may develop a website and web content in house or they may hire a consultant. In both cases, the organization has control of the functionality and the appearance of the website, as well as its content. Therefore, the organization has the responsibility and ability to incorporate accessibility.

Terminology

Understanding the terminology is the first step to implementing this requirement successfully.

Organizations should refer to the definitions in Section 14 (7) in the Regulation for more information.

The following is an easy reference list of definitions for other key terms used in this section of the regulation.

What is WCAG?

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 is an international standard for making websites and web content accessible to a broader range of users with disabilities.

WCAG was developed by a team of experts from around the world. The first version, WCAG 1.0, was released in 1999. WCAG 2.0 was released in 2008.

What does Level A and Level AA mean?

WCAG 2.0 Level A and Level AA refer to a series of technical checkpoints that make websites and their content increasingly accessible to a broader range of users with disabilities.

Level AA builds on Level A’s checkpoints.

What does new website and content mean?

A new website refers to a site with a new domain name “- a brand new web address. The term does not
refer to a new page or new link on an existing site.

The term also refers to a site with an existing domain name that is undergoing a significant
“refresh”. There is not an industry standard definition for significant refresh. In this context,
“significant refresh”could include, but is not limited to, the following elements:

  • a new look and feel to the website
  • a change in how users navigate around it
  • a major update and change to the content of the website.

Content may include any information that may be found on a web page or web application, including text, images, forms and sounds.

What does practicable mean?

Organizations are required to meet their WCAG 2.0 requirements, unless it is not practicable to do so. Under this requirement, practicability refers to the organization’s ability given all of the circumstances to modify their websites and web content.

Section 14(6) of the regulation states that when organizations are determining whether meeting the requirement is practicable, they may consider the following factors, among others:

  • the availability of commercial software or tools
  • the affect that the deadline would have on the implementation timelines for projects that were planned or initiated before January 1, 2012.

Additionally, transactional applications may have significant refreshes that are on a different cycle than the rest of the website. Organizations may take this into account when considering what is practicable.

Website Information Posted Prior to 2012

Content published on a website before January 1, 2012 is not required to be compliant with WCAG 2.0. However, people with disabilities can still request information to be provided in an accessible format under the Section 12, “Accessible Formats and Communication Supports”.

Website Information Posted After 2012

Web content, including documents such as Word and PDFs, posted after January 1, 2012 will need to be accessible as per the regulation.

Availability of Commercial Software and Tools

Some organizations may have used software, web applications and other tools that pre-date WCAG 2.0 to develop their websites and web content. These tools may have varying ability to create websites and web content that will conform with WCAG 2.0
requirements. As a result, organizations have until 2021 to comply as this will allow them to take advantage of emerging software, web applications and tools to make existing websites and web content accessible.

Technological Capability

Some organizations may be limited by technological capability. For example, there may be technological software limitations in making online maps and complex diagrams accessible to people with visual disabilities. In such cases, an accessible alternate version can be provided if requested.

Projects Planned Prior to January 1, 2012

In determining practicability, the regulation allows organizations to consider projects planned before January 1, 2012 that may be significantly affected by implementing WCAG 2.0 requirements.

However, once updated, websites and web content would need to meet the WCAG 2.0 compliance dates set out in the regulation.

Some of the WCAG 2.0 requirements can improve the accessibility of an application and would not significantly delay implementation. Organizations are required to think about and take reasonable steps to overcome barriers that people with disabilities might encounter when using their websites.

Staggered Timelines for Compliance

The regulation has staggered timelines for designated public sector organizations, as well as private and not-for-profit organizations with 50 or more employees. These organizations must comply with WCAG 2.0, Level A and then with WCAG, 2.0 Level AA, excluding the requirements for live captioning and pre-recorded audio descriptions.

Staggered timelines allow organizations to build accessibility into their regular re-fresh cycles and to implement systematic approaches to increase their web accessibility and to meet the compliance dates. On average, organizations update their website every two or three years; the timelines will allow two or three opportunities for organizations to build accessibility into their regular website update.

By planning for accessibility in advance, organizations may be able to reduce their costs as well as to improve web-based experiences for people with disabilities.

Section 15: Educational and Training Resources and Materials

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

15(1) Every obligated organization that is an educational or training institution shall do the following, if notification of
need is given:

  • Provide educational or training resources or materials in an accessible format that takes into account the accessibility needs due to a disability of the person with a disability to whom the material is to be provided by,
    • procuring through purchase or obtaining by other means an accessible or conversion ready electronic format of educational or
      training resources or materials, where available, or
    • arranging for the provision of a comparable resource in an accessible or conversion ready electronic format, if educational or
      training resources or materials cannot be procured, obtained by other means or converted into an accessible format.
  • Provide student records and information on program requirements, availability and descriptions in an accessible format
    to persons with disabilities.

(2) For purposes of this section and sections 16, 17 and 18, an obligated organization is an educational or training institution if
it falls into one of the following categories:

  • It is governed by the Education Act or the Private Career Colleges Act, 2005.
  • It offers all or part of a post-secondary program leading to a degree pursuant to a consent granted under the Post-Secondary
    Education Choice and Excellence Act, 2000.
  • It is a designated public sector organization described in paragraph 3 or 4 of Schedule 1.
  • It is a public or private organization that provides courses or programs or both that result in the acquisition by students of a
    diploma or certificate named by the Minister of Education under paragraph 1 of subsection 8 (1) of the Education Act.
  • It is a private school within the meaning of the Education Act.

Intent of the Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all educational and training institutions, as defined in the Integrated Accessibility Standard Regulation, will provide students who have disabilities with the following in an accessible format:

  • educational and training materials and/or resources
  • student records
  • course and program information.

For more detailed information, go to Information and Communications Standard, Section 12, “Accessible Formats and Communication Supports“.

For more information on the definition of educational and training institutions, please go to Information and Communications Standard, Section 15, “Educational and Training Resources and Materials “.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies only to organizations that are educational or training institutions.

  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2013
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015

Implementing the Requirement

Notification of Need

Students can notify educational or training institutions of their need for information in accessible formats. In certain
circumstances, parents or legal guardians can also notify the institutions.

It is important for educational and training institutions to be responsive once they know of a student’s need
and to work towards providing the appropriate accessible or conversion ready formats in a timely manner.

Educational and training institutions that use Individualized Education Plans (IEP), or similar plans, should indicate what types
of formats and/or supports the student requires. This would be considered another form of notification of need. Similar plans
dealing with the needs of students with disabilities may also constitute a notification of need.

Resources and Materials

Institutions will need to provide materials or resources in accessible or conversion-ready formats that take into account the
accessibility needs of the student, when notified. The institutions can buy this material in accessible or conversion ready formats, procure it by other means, or arrange for a comparable resource.

Ideally, institutions will be able to provide accessible or conversion-ready versions of the same materials and resources used
in the classroom. When this is not possible, institutions are required to provide students with similar resources or materials
that will, to the degree possible, allow for the same or a comparable learning opportunity.

Example: An accessible version of a globe for a person with a visual disability could be a tactile world map.

Although a map is not the same resource as a globe, it would provide the student with a similar learning opportunity.

In many cases, the resources and materials used by educational and training institutions are developed and published by other
organizations.

In such cases, the institutions do not have control over the content of the information or how it was published. Nevertheless,
they are still required to provide all information used in the classroom to students who have disabilities in accessible or
conversion-ready formats.

When it is not technically feasible to provide the information in an accessible or a conversion-ready format, the institution is
required to provide a comparable resource. If an institution decides that the materials requested are unconvertible, then it
must explain why and provide a summary of the information.

Example: An institution is asked to convert a medical textbook to an accessible format. Although converting the text poses no
problem, the technology does not exist to convert the complex medical images. In this case, the institution is required to
convert the text into an accessible or conversion-ready format, and where the images were found, to provide summaries or descriptions
of them.

Student Records and Program Information

When an educational or training institution is notified of an accessibility need, they are required to provide student records,
program requirements, course descriptions, and information on the availability of courses in an accessible format. Institutions will
need to be prepared for requests from current and former students, as well as potential students.

Educational and training institutions are required to work with the individual to determine which type of format will be provided. For example, a student with a visual disability may prefer accessible documents that can be used with their screen reader technology. In many cases, educational and training institutions will have the capacity in-house to provide this information in an
accessible format.

There may be occasions when educational or training institutions are unable to create an accessible format of the
student’s records in-house. This may be because of the complexity of the record or the format requested. If an
institution hires an external company to convert this information, then it should put in place measures to protect the privacy of the
student’s personal information.

For more information on:

  • 4accessible formats4
  • conversion-ready formats
  • the term unconvertible

Please go to the glossary, which gives a general description. For more detailed information, go to Information and Communication Standard, Section 12, “Accessible Formats and Communication Supports “.

Section 16: Training to Educators

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

16(1) In addition to the requirements under section 7, obligated organizations that are school boards or educational or training
institutions shall provide educators with accessibility awareness training related to accessible program or course delivery and
instruction.

(2) Obligated organizations that are school boards or educational or training institutions shall keep a record of the
training provided under this section, including the dates on which the training is provided and the number of individuals to whom it
is provided.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that educators receive accessibility awareness training so they can create inclusive
environments in their classrooms and increase the opportunities for learning for students with disabilities.

When do Organizations have to comply

This requirement only applies to organizations that are school boards or educational or training institutions.

For more information of the definition of educational and training institutions, please go to Information and Communications, Section 15, “Educational and Training Resources and Materials” .

  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2013
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015

Implementing the Requirement

School boards as well as education and training institutions are required to provide training to their educators. In the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation, the term ‘educator’refers to any
employee who is involved in designing, delivering or instructing courses. This includes teaching assistants, educational assistants, early childhood educators, and staff of school boards.

The requirement does not apply to parents who volunteer, students working in job placements, or other individuals who participate in classroom activities or act in a role of educator. However, when these persons are acting in an educator role, it may be helpful if the classroom educators passed on what they had learned during their accessibility training.

For example: A student teacher is developing a lesson plan. The classroom teacher can work with the student teacher to address the accessibility needs of students with disabilities in the plan.

Accessibility Awareness Training

The purpose of the training is to increase educators’awareness of accessibility needs in
program or course delivery and instruction. Increasing accessibility in classrooms is important for student success and
involvement.

Aspects of accessibility awareness training may include:

  • different types of disabilities
  • needs often associated with different types of disabilities
  • barriers students with disabilities encounter in schools
  • techniques that improve the learning environment for students with disabilities.

The training should encourage educators to consider a variety of learning resources and materials when developing their lesson plans
and choosing their resources or materials.

Examples:

  • Before using movies in classes, educators should consider if there are any students who are hard of hearing or deaf. If the movie has closed-captioning, then it may be suitable to use. When movies are not accessible to all of the students, the educators
    should consider other resources.
  • A student with a physical disability may not be able to participate in the dissection component of a biology class. The school could provide the student with a virtual program that would allow for a similar learning opportunity.

The regulation does not state how the accessibility awareness training should be provided. It is up to the institutions or school
boards to decide on the best training methods for their educators. For example, it could be part of a larger training program, or it
could be an individual course completed independently by educators. School boards or institutions could offer the training using
handouts, on-line learning modules, or one-day workshops.

Training Record

School boards and education and training institutions will need to keep records of the training. They must include the dates on
which the training took place and the number of individuals who attended.

Relationship with General Training Requirement

School boards and educational and training institutions still have to comply with the training requirements set out in Part 1 General Requirements, Section 7 , “Training”.

Section 17: Producers of Educational or Training Material

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

17(1) Every obligated organization that is a producer of educational or training textbooks for educational or training
institutions shall upon request, make accessible or conversion ready versions of the textbooks available to the institutions.

(2) Every obligated organization that is a producer of print-based educational or training supplementary learning
resources for educational or training institutions shall upon request, make accessible or conversion ready versions of the
printed materials available to the institutions

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that producers of textbooks and print-based supplementary educational and training resources
provide educational and training institutions with accessible or conversion-ready versions of these materials, when requested.

If producers make textbooks and print-based supplementary resources available in accessible and conversion-ready formats,
then institutions will be able to provide them to students with disabilities in a timely manner.

When do Organizations have to Comply

  • All organizations that produce textbooks January 1, 2015
  • All organizations that produce printed educational or training supplementary learning resources January 1, 2020

Implementing the Requirement

In the context of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation, producers are organizations that provide textbooks and
other print-based supplementary learning resources to educational and training institutions. In Ontario, universities, university
presses, private publishing companies, and school boards, among others, produce these materials.

For more information of the definition of educational and training institutions, please go to Information and Communications Standard, Section 15, “Educational and Training
Resources and Materials
” .

Unconvertible Information

In some cases, producers may be unable to convert part of the information in a textbook or supplementary learning resource to an
accessible or conversion-ready format. If this happens, then the producer must explain the reason why and provide a summary of the
information.

Example: A producer is asked to convert a medical textbook into an accessible format. Although converting the text poses no problem, the technology does not exist to convert the complex medical images. In this case, the producer is required to convert
the text into an accessible or conversion-ready format, and where the images were found, to provide summaries or descriptions of
them.

Producers should notify the requesting institution of any limitations that would slow them down or prevent them from
providing conversion- ready or accessible formats. For example, the producer might not be able to convert a textbook because the
organization does not control the content. If this happens, then the educational and training institutions are required to provide
students with comparable learning resources or materials.

For more information on:

  • accessible formats
  • conversion-ready formats
  • the term unconvertible

Please go to the glossary , which gives a general description. For more detailed information, go to Information and Communication Standard, Section 12, “Accessible Formats and
Communication Supports
” .

Section 18: Libraries of Educational and Training Institutions

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

18(1) Subject to subsection (2) and where available, the libraries of educational and training institutions that are
obligated organizations shall provide, procure or acquire by other means an accessible or conversion ready format of print, digital or multimedia resources or materials for a person with a disability, upon request.

(2) Special collections, archival materials, rare books and donations are exempt from the requirements of subsection (1).

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that, on request, libraries of educational and training institutions will provide accessible or conversion-ready formats of library materials when they are available. This requirement does not include rare books, special
collections, archived materials, and donated books and other donated materials.

For more information about the definition of educational and training institutions, please go to Information and Communications
Standard, Section 15, “Educational and Training
Resources and Materials
” .

When do Organizations have to Comply

Libraries of educational and training institutions

January 1, 2015

print resources and materials

January 1, 2020

digital or multimedia resources or materials

Implementing the Requirement

When requested, and where available, libraries of educational and training institutions are required to provide accessible or
conversion-ready formats of print, digital or multimedia resources or materials to students with disabilities.

Print resources can include, but are not limited to, books, magazines, posters, journals, newspapers and newspaper articles.
Digital or multimedia resources are usually a combination of text and audio and include, but are not limited to, materials such as
films, videos, CD-ROMS and DVDs.

Under the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation educational and training libraries are not required to provide
accessible or conversion-ready formats of their special collections, archival materials, rare books and books or other
materials that have been donated. However, these organizations do have requirements to accommodate students with disabilities under
the Ontario Human Rights Code .

Availability of Information

Even if they do not control the information, libraries of educational and training institutions are required to provide
accessible or conversion-ready formats of resources and materials, where available. In some cases, the libraries may need to take
additional steps to find the requested materials in accessible or conversion ready formats including contacting the publishers or
asking for inter-library loans.

Example: A college library in a small city does not have a 19th century novel written in another language in an accessible or
conversion-ready format. However, after a search, the librarians discover that a university library in another city does have the
novel in a conversion-ready format, and they put in a request for an inter-library loan.

Unconvertible Information

There may be times when a library is unable to provide the material in accessible or conversion ready formats. If a library
learns that the requested materials or resources are unconvertible, then it needs to explain the reason why and provide a summary of
the information. The summary must take into account the accessibility needs of the person who made the request.

Example: A student who has a visual disability has requested a book on the history of art. After an extensive search, the
librarians conclude that they cannot obtain the whole book in an accessible or conversion ready format. They can provide the student
with an accessible version of the text; however it does not contain the images. In this case, the library is required to explain the
reason why and to provide the student with a summary of the images which could include the artists’ names and time
periods or a general description of the images.

For more information on conversion-ready formats and accessible formats, please go to the glossary , which gives a general description. For more detailed information, go to the Information and Communication Standard, Section 12,
Accessible Formats and Communication
Supports
” .

Section 19: Public Libraries

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

19. (1) Every obligated organization that is a library board shall provide access to or arrange for the provision of access to
accessible materials where they exist.

(2) Obligated organizations that are library boards shall make information about the availability of accessible materials publicly
available and shall provide the information in accessible format or with appropriate communication supports, upon request.

(3) Obligated organizations that are library boards may provide accessible formats for archival materials, special collections, rare books and donations.

(4) Obligated organizations that are library boards shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2013.

(5) For the purposes of this section library board means a board as defined in the Public Libraries Act, a public library service
established under the Northern Services Board Act or a county library established under the County of Lambton Act, 1944, being
Chapter Pr31 of the Statutes of Ontario 1994, the County of Elgin Act, 1985, being chapter Pr16 of the Statutes of Ontario, 1985 of
the County of Lennox and Addington Act, 1978, being chapter 126 of the Statutes of Ontario, 1978.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that, when requested, public libraries provide access to accessible library materials, where they exist.

When do Organizations have to Comply

All public library boards, as defined in the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation , are required to meet this
requirement by January 1, 2013.

In the context of this requirement, “accessible materials”includes all
works of literary, musical, artistic, draatic nature, in accessible formats such as, but not limited to, print, electronic,
video, DVD, audio, braille, etc.

Library boards are required to provide access to, or arrange for access to, accessible materials where they exist. Under the Public
Libraries Act, library boards are already accountable to their community in terms of provision of service, including access to
works in the collection.

Some library boards will have extensive collections of accessible materials, while other library systems may have smaller
collections. In some cases, library systems may want to consider using document-sharing systems such as the inter-library loan
system in Ontario to provide accessible materials to their users.

When procuring new library materials, library boards are required to consider the accessibility needs of their users so that
their collections are accessible to the widest range of people.

Special Collections, Rare Books and Archival Materials

If possible, libraries may provide archival material, rare books and special collections in accessible formats.

Rare books, special collections and archival materials in public libraries are usually kept apart from the circulating collection.
They may require special handling and treatment for conservation purposes, and may be in fragile condition and/or may be original works. The technology may not be available to convert some of these documents into accessible formats without damaging the documents or
losing their meaning. In this case, libraries may choose to make the works accessible, if possible (e.g. technological solutions, or
photocopying).

Notification

Library boards are required to tell the public about the availability of accessible materials within their library
systems.

For example, the boards may choose to tell the public by posting the information on their websites, or on bulletin boards in their
libraries, or in the boards’ publications that list events, classes and courses at the libraries.

When notifying the public, libraries may choose to explain what materials are available within the community’s
public library system, including identifying accessible materials in the library’s on-line catalogue or what materials are available through the inter-library loan system. Library boards may also want to mention how long inter-library loans can take. They may also describe other materials that are available in accessible formats, e.g., information on community events.

Library boards are required to make sure that when they notify the public about the availability of accessible materials, they do
so in accessible formats or with the appropriate communication supports, when requested.

This notification requirement only applies to information and communications that the library boards control directly or
indirectly through a contractual relationship. This information includes pamphlets, newsletters, public library reports, etc.

For more information on accessible formats and communication supports please go to the glossary , which gives a general
description. For more detailed information, go to Information and Communication Standard, Section 12, “Accessible
Formats and Communication Supports
“.

Section 20: Scope and Interpretation

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

20(1) The standards set out in this Part apply to obligated organizations that are employers and,

  • apply in respect of employees; and
  • do not apply in respect of volunteers and other non-paid individuals. O. Reg. 191/11, s. 20 (1).

(2) In this Part, a reference to an employer is a reference to an obligated organization as an employer unless the context
determines otherwise.

Intent of this Requirement

This section establishes that the requirements that employers have under the Employment Standard apply to paid employees.

Implementing the Requirement

The requirements that employers have under the Employment Standard apply to paid employees. This includes, but is not limited
to, full-time, part-time, paid apprenticeships and seasonal employment.

As a good business practice, employers may apply the standard to unpaid staff and volunteers and other forms of unpaid work.

Section 21: Schedule

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

21. Unless otherwise specified in a section, obligated organizations, as employers, shall meet the requirements set out in
this Part in accordance with the following schedule:

  • For the Government of Ontario and the Legislative Assembly, January 1, 2013.
  • For large designated public sector organizations, January 1, 2014.
  • For small designated public sector organizations, January 1, 2015.
  • For large organizations, January 1, 2016.
  • For small organizations, January 1, 2017.

Intent of this Requirement

This section establishes the compliance timelines that employers
must meet for the Employment Standard.

Implementing the Requirement

Employers must comply with the Employment Standard as follows:

  • Government of Ontario and Legislative Assembly January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2016
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2017

Please note that Section 27 of the Employment Standard, Workplace Emergency Response Information, has a compliance date of January 1, 2012 for all obligated organizations.

In addition, some requirements do not apply to private and not-for-profit employers with 1-49 employees. These exemptions are
noted in the relevant section of the Employment Standard.

Employers should determine the type of organization they are, the requirements they must meet and the associated compliance
timelines.

Section 22: Recruitment General

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

22. Every employer shall notify its employees and the public about the availability of accommodation for applicants with
disabilities in its recruitment processes.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all employers will notify internal and external job applicants that, where needed,
accommodations for disabilities will be provided, on request, to support their participation in all aspects of the recruitment
process.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to all employers in Ontario with one or more employees.

  • Government of Ontario and the Legislative Assembly January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2016
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2017

Implementing the Requirement

Employers are required to notify their employees and the public about the availability of accommodations for disabilities, where
needed, to support their participation in recruitment processes.

By notifying potential internal or external applicants about the availability of accommodations, employers invite individuals with
disabilities to participate in recruitment processes.

Employers, however, have the flexibility to consider their existing recruitment processes in determining how they provide
notification.

For example, employers could use their websites or their job postings to notify potential applicants about the availability of
recruitment-related accommodations for disabilities.

Section 23: Recruitment, Assessment Or Selection Process

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

23.(1) During a recruitment process, an employer shall notify job applicants, when they are individually selected to participate
in an assessment or selection process, that accommodations are available upon request in relation to the materials or processes to
be used.

(2) If a selected applicant requests an accommodation, the employer shall consult with the applicant and provide or arrange
for the provision of a suitable accommodation in a manner that takes into account the applicant’s accessibility
needs due to disability.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all employers will notify job applicants who have been invited to participate in a
recruitment, assessment or selection process that, where needed, accommodations for disabilities are available, on request, to
support their participation in the process.

In addition, employers are required to consult with job applicants who request accommodations to support them during the
process.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to all employers in Ontario with one or more employees.

  • Government of Ontario and Legislative Assembly January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2016
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2017

Implementing the Requirement

Employers are required to notify applicants who have been selected to participate in a recruitment, assessment or selection
process that, where needed, recruitment-related accommodations for disabilities are available on request.

This requirement builds upon Section 22, “Recruitment General“, by requiring
employers to notify all selected applicants about the availability of recruitment-related accommodations.

This requirement recognizes that recruitment practices vary from employer to employer and could include interviews, presentations,
written assignments and competency assessments.

Employers may consider their existing recruitment policies and practices when deciding how they will notify the applicants
selected for assessment.

For example, employers could notify applicants through a variety of means such as calling them on the telephone, speaking to them in
person, writing them a letter or sending them an email.

If an applicant with a disability requests accommodations during the recruitment process, employers must provide or arrange for
suitable accommodations.

Providing suitable accommodations means that an employer consults with an applicant with a disability to understand and take
into account the individual’s needs so that the accommodations that are provided are effective.

Section 24: Notice to Successful Applicants

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

24. Every employer shall, when making offers of employment, notify the successful applicant of its policies for accommodating
employees with disabilities.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all employers will notify successful applicants of their policies for accommodating employees
with disabilities when offering employment.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to all employers in Ontario with one or more employees.

  • Government of Ontario and Legislative Assembly January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2016
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2017

Implementing the Requirement

When employers make offers of employment, they must notify the successful applicants of their policies for accommodating employees
with disabilities.

Employers have the flexibility to determine how they will notify successful applicants of their policies for accommodating employees
with disabilities.

For example, employers could notify applicants through a variety of means such as calling them on the telephone, speaking to them in
person, sending them an email or including it in the offer letter.

This requirement applies to all successful applicants. Its purpose is to make sure that they know the
employer’s accommodation policies when making career decisions.

Section 25: Informing Employees of Supports

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

25.(1) Every employer shall inform its employees of its policies used to support its employees with disabilities, including, but not
limited to, policies on the provision of job accommodations that take into account an employee’saccessibility
needs due to disability.

(2) Employers shall provide the information required under this section to new employees as soon as practicable after they begin
their employment.

(3)Employers shall provide updated information to its employees whenever there is a change to existing policies on the provision of
job accommodations that take into account an employee’saccessibility needs due to
disability.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all employers will inform new and existing employees of their policies for supporting
employees with disabilities, including providing employment-related accommodations for disabilities.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to all employers in Ontario with one or more employees.

  • Government of Ontario and the Legislative Assembly January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2016
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2017

Implementing the Requirement

Employers are required to inform all employees of their policies for supporting employees with disabilities. This includes their
policies on providing employment-related accommodations that take into account the accessibility needs of employees with
disabilities.

Employers have the flexibility to inform employees about their policies in a way that best fits their existing organizational
culture and business practices. Many employers may already have processes in place to provide information to their employees
including the following:

  • newsletters
  • emails
  • staff memos
  • websites
  • staff meetings.

Employers are required to inform their employees of their policies for supporting employees with disabilities as soon as is
practicable after they begin their employment, or as this requirement comes into effect.

In addition, employers must inform their employees whenever there is a change to their policies for supporting employees with
disabilities.

It is important for employees to be kept up-to-date and aware of their employer’s policies because individuals
can acquire disabilities at any point in their lives, which may require employment-related accommodations.

Section 26: Accessible Formats and Communication Supports For Employees

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

26.1 In addition to its obligations under section 12, where an employee with a disability so requests it, every employer shall
consult with the employee to provide or arrange for the provision of accessible formats and communication supports for,

  • information that is needed in order to perform the employee’sjob; and
  • information that is generally available to employees in the workplace. O. Reg. 191/11, s. 26 (1).

2. The employer shall consult with the employee making the request in determining the suitability of an accessible format or
communication support.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all employers will consult with their employees who have disabilities in order to
provide them with the accessible formats and communications supports they require to do their jobs effectively and to be
informed of information that is generally available to all employees in that workplace.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to all employers in Ontario with one or more employees.

  • Government of Ontario and Legislative Assembly January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2016
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2017

Implementing the Requirement

On request, employers are required to consult with employees with disabilities to determine which accessible formats or
communications supports they require. Not all accessible formats or communications supports are helpful to all persons who have
disabilities. The accommodation need is as individual as the person is.

Once the employer and employee have determined what the needs are, then the organization must work out how to accommodate the
person.

This requirement gives the employer the flexibility to decide on the most appropriate accessible formats or communications supports
for the employee. That will depend on the needs of the employee with the disability and the capacity of the employer to provide the
support.

For more information on accessible formats and communications supports, please go to the glossary , which gives a general description. For more detailed information, go to Information and Communication Standard, Section 12, “Accessible
Formats and Communications Supports
“.

Workplace Information

This requirement applies to information that employees with disabilities need to perform their jobs effectively. For example,
managers usually need to have a good working knowledge of their organizations’human resources policies to hire, train and support staff.

The requirement also applies to information that is generally available in a workplace such as company newsletters, bulletins
about company policies and fact sheets on health and safety information for workers. These may be provided in a variety of formats including the following:

  • print
  • email
  • website
  • staff notice boards
  • verbally

Documenting Accessible Formats and Communications Supports

If an employee has an individual accommodation plan, then the accessible formats and/or communications supports that will be
provided to the employee should be included in the plan.

For more information on individual accommodation plans, please go to Employment Standard, Section 28,
Documented Individual Accommodation Plans “.

Section 27: Workplace Emergency Response Information

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

27.(1) Every employer shall provide individualized workplace emergency response information to employees who have a disability,
if the disability is such that the individualized information is necessary and the employer is aware of the need for accommodation
due to the employee’sdisability.

(2) If an employee who receives individualized workplace emergency response information requires assistance and with the
employee’sconsent, the employer shall provide the workplace emergency response information to the person
designated by the employer to provide assistance to the employee.

(3) Employers shall provide the information required under this section as soon as practicable after the employer becomes aware of
the need for accommodation due to the employee’sdisability.

(4) Every employer shall review the individualized workplace emergency response information,

  • when the employee moves to a different location in the organization;
  • when the employee’soverall accommodations needs or plans are reviewed; and
  • when the employer reviews its general emergency response policies.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all employers will prepare for the specific needs that employees with disabilities may
have in emergency situations.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to all employers in Ontario with one or more employees.

  • Government of Ontario and
    Legislative Assembly January 1, 2012
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees

Implementing the Requirement

Employers are required to prepare for emergency situations by providing employees with disabilities with individualized workplace
emergency response information. This will help employees with disabilities, and the employers that they work for, to prepare for
a range of potential emergencies including, but not limited to, the following:

  • fire
  • power outages
  • severe weather
  • natural disasters
  • security incidents

When to Provide Individual Workplace Emergency Response Information

Employers are required to provide individualized workplace emergency response information under the following conditions.

  • When the employee’sdisability is such that the information is necessary; and
  • The employer is aware of the need for accommodation because of the employee’sdisability.

There are several ways that an employer may be made aware of the need to provide individualized workplace emergency response
information:

  • A new employee may have requested accommodations during the recruitment process. For example, an applicant with a learning
    disability, such as dyslexia, who requires more time to read interview questions.
  • Existing employees tell their employers that they have a disability. For example, an existing employee who develops vision
    loss and requests screen reader software for his/her computer.
  • An existing employee who develops a temporary disability such as a broken leg.

Employers are not expected to provide individualized workplace emergency information for employees with disabilities of which they
are unaware.

In most cases, employees with disabilities will tell their employers that they have a disability that requires accommodation.
However, there may be other times where an employer may initiate a dialogue to offer assistance and accommodation to an employee who
is clearly unwell or perceived to have a disability.

Developing Individual Workplace Emergency Response Information

It is important that employers recognize how an individual’sdisability, as well as the physical
nature of the workplace, may create unique challenges in emergency situations. For example:

  • An employee who has a hearing disability may not hear an alarm and may need to be notified by other means, such as a visual alarm
    with flashing lights.
  • An employee with a visual disability may be unable to identify the escape routes, or obstructions to the escape routes.

For these reasons and others, employers should consult with employees who have disabilities, so that the individualized
workplace emergency response information meets the employees ‘needs.

When an Employee Needs Assistance

Employees with disabilities may require assistance when evacuating the workplace in emergencies.

In these cases, and with the employees consent, the employer is required to provide the employees’
individualized workplace emergency response information to the designated individual(s).

Employers, however, need to respect their employees’ privacy. For co-workers to provide
assistance, they do not need to know the details of the employees’ disabilities.

For example, an employee with limited mobility may need assistance walking down stairs. The person designated to help only
needs to know the individual requires help walking down stairs. In other words, it is important to not include personal medical
information in the individualized workplace emergency response information.

Reviewing Individualized Workplace Emergency Response Information

Employers are required to review the individualized workplace emergency response information to make sure it remains effective
and up-to-date.

Employers must review this information under the following circumstances:

  • When the employee moves to a different physical location in the organization.
  • When the employee’soverall accommodation needs or plans are reviewed.
  • When the employer reviews its general emergency response policies.

Employers may choose to review the information at other times. For instance, an employer may review the individualized workplace
emergency response information if the existing response information was put to the test during an evacuation drill or a real
emergency.

Documenting Individualized Workplace Emergency Response Information

If an employee has an individual accommodation plan, then the individualized workplace emergency response information provided to
the employee should be included in the plan.

For more information on individual accommodation plans, please go to Employment Standard, Section 28
Documented Individual Accommodation Plans” .

Section 28: Documented Individual Accommodation Plans

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

28.(1) Employers, other than employers that are small organizations, shall develop and have in place a written process
for the development of documented individual accommodation plans for employees with disabilities.

(2) The process for the development of documented individual accommodation plans shall include the following elements:

  • The manner in which an employee requesting accommodation can participate in the development of the individual accommodation
    plan.
  • The means by which the employee is assessed on an individual basis.
  • The manner in which the employer can request an evaluation by an outside medical or other expert, at the
    employer’sexpense, to determine if and how accommodation can be achieved.
  • The manner in which the employee can request the participation of a representative from their bargaining agent, where the employee is represented by a bargaining agent, or other representative from the workplace, where the employee is not represented by a
    bargaining agent, in the development of the accommodation plan.
  • The steps taken to protect the privacy of the employee’spersonal information.
  • The frequency with which the individual accommodation plan will be reviewed and updated and the manner in which it will be
    done.
  • If an individual accommodation plan is denied, the manner in which the reasons for the denial will be provided to the
    employee.
  • The means of providing the individual accommodation plan in a format that takes into account the employee’s
    accessibility needs due to disability.

(3) Individual accommodation plans shall,

  • if requested, include any information regarding accessible formats and communications supports provided, as described in
    section 26;
  • if required, include individualized workplace emergency response information, as described in section 27; and
  • identify any other accommodation that is to be provided.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that employers will develop written individual accommodation plans for employees with
disabilities.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to employers, except small private and not-for-profit employers with 1-49 employees.

Small private and not-for-profit employers are still required to accommodate the needs of employees with disabilities, to the point
of undue hardship, under the Ontario Human Rights Code.

  • Government of Ontario and Legislative Assembly January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2016

Implementing the Requirement

Under the Ontario Human Rights Code, employers are already required to accommodate the needs of employees with disabilities to the point of undue hardship. As a result, many employers may already have similar processes in place and can build on them to
meet this requirement.

More information on accommodating employees with disabilities under the Ontario Human Rights Code can be found at: http://www.ohrc.on.ca/en/issues/employment

Under the Employment Standard, obligated employers are required to develop individual accommodation plans for employees with
disabilities of which they have been made aware. In most cases, employees with disabilities will tell their employers that they
have a disability that requires accommodation. However, there may be other times where an employer may initiate a dialogue to offer
assistance and accommodation to an employee who is clearly unwell or perceived to have a disability.

Individual accommodation plans are a formal way of recording and reviewing the workplace-related accommodations that an employer
will provide to an employee with a disability. Accommodation plans are living documents. They are reviewed and updated so that they
remain effective and up-to-date.

This section requires obligated employers to develop a process to determine and document the accommodation needs of employees with
disabilities.

By establishing a process for developing individual accommodation plans, employers should have in place a clear and
consistent approach for accommodating employees with disabilities within their organization.

Under this requirement, employers have the flexibility to work with the employees in order for the employer to find appropriate
accommodations.

Developing Individual Accommodation Plans

There are several steps to take when developing individual accommodation plans. These are a few of the key points to consider
when developing them.

  • How employees with disabilities can be involved in the development process of their plans
  • How employers can seek outside medical or other expert evaluation so that they can provide effective supports
  • What steps employers will take to protect the privacy of personal information
  • How frequently individual accommodation plans will be reviewed and updated, and how this will be done

Important – Employers must remember that the information they collect to develop individual accommodation plans
is private.

Why Reviews are Required

Reviewing individual accommodation plans will allow employers to consider what adjustments, if any, to the plans are required when
changes occur. These changes could include the following:

  • An employee changes jobs within the organization
  • An employee’sneeds for accommodation change because of a recurring or sporadic illness
  • An employer’spolicies and practices change

Additional Information for Individual Accommodation Plans

If applicable, individual accommodation plans must also include the employee’sworkplace emergency response
information and the accessible formats and communications supports that the employee requires. The plans must also include any other
accommodations that the employee needs to do their job.

For more information on accessible formats or communications supports, please go to the glossary , which gives a general
description. For more detailed information, Information and Communication Standard, Section 12, “Accessible
Formats and Communications Supports
“.

For more information on workplace emergency response information, please go to Employment Standard, Section 27,
Workplace Emergency Response Information“.

Section 29: Return to Work Process

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

29.(1) Every employer, other than an employer that is a small organization,

  • shall develop and have in place a return to work process for its employees who have been absent from work due to a disability
    and require disability-related accommodations in order to return to work; and
  • shall document the process.

(2) The return to work process shall,

  • outline the steps the employer will take to facilitate the return to work of employees who were absent because their
    disability required them to be away from work; and
  • use individual documented accommodation plans, as described in section 28, as part of the process.

(3) The return to work process referenced in this section does not replace or override any other return to work process created by
or under any other statute.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that employers will have in place a documented process for supporting employees who return to
work after being away for reasons related to their disabilities.

If an individual’sillness or injury is covered by the return to work provisions of the Workplace Safety
and Insurance Act, then that Act’sreturn to work process would apply.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to all employers in Ontario, except small private and not-for-profit employers with 1-49 employees.

Small private and not-for-profit employers are still required to accommodate the needs of employees with disabilities, to the point
of undue hardship, under the Ontario Human Rights Code.

  • Government of Ontario and Legislative Assembly January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2016

Implementing the Requirement

Employers are required to develop return to work processes that document the steps they will take to help employees to return to
work when:

  • they have been absent because of their disability; and
  • they need some form of disability-related accommodation to return to work.

Return to work processes may be appropriate for employees who have permanent, recurring or temporary disabilities. For example,
return to work accommodations may be appropriate when an employee:

  • has a broken leg as a result a recreational accident
  • is undergoing treatment such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy
  • has episodes of mental illness
  • has a disease that results in an evolving or worsening disability, such as multiple sclerosis

It is important is to determine whether some form of employment-related accommodation is required to allow the employee
to effectively return to work.

Obligated employers are required to document their return-to-work processes so that they become part of their business
practices and are applied consistently.

Employers have the flexibility to create return to work processes that best fit their existing organizational culture and
business practices. For instance, some employers may already have return to work policies in place, which may meet this requirement
or can be built upon to meet this requirement.

If an employee requires disability-related accommodation to effectively return to work, employers must develop an individual
accommodation plan for that employee.

For more information on individual accommodation plans, please go to Employment Standard, Section 28, “Documented
Individual Accommodation Plans
” .

Section 30: Performance Management

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

30.(1) An employer that uses performance management in respect of its employees shall take into account the accessibility needs of
employees with disabilities, as well as individual accommodation plans, when using its performance management process in respect of
employees with disabilities.

(2) In this section, “performance management”means activities related to assessing and
improving employee performance, productivity and effectiveness, with the goal of facilitating employee success.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all employers that use performance management processes will take into account the
accessibility needs of employees with disabilities.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to employers with one or more employees that have performance management processes in place.

  • Government of Ontario and Legislative Assembly January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Designate public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2016
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees
    January 1, 2017

Implementing the Requirement

Employers that have performance management processes in place are required to consider the accessibility needs of employees with
disabilities in these processes.

Performance management processes may be informal or formal and will vary from employer to employer. For instance, small employers
may engage in informal conversations with employees about their performance on the job. Larger employers, however, may have human
resource departments that develop and oversee formal performance management processes.

There are many ways in which employers can take into account the accessibility needs of employees with disabilities in their
performance management processes. For example, employers can:

  • Review an employee’individual accommodation plan to understand the employee’s
    accommodation needs and determine whether it needs adjusting to improve his or her performance on the job.
  • Have documents related to performance management, such as performance plans, available in accessible formats, such as large
    print for individuals with low vision.
  • Provide informal and formal coaching and feedback in a manner that takes into account an employee’s
    disability, such as using plain language for an individual with a learning disability.

What is Performance Management?

Many employers have annual performance reviews or other performance management processes, which can result in an
employee’s responsibilities changing. If the employee has a disability, then the employer must revisit the
employee’s individual accommodation plan to see
if any adjustments are required.

For more information on individual accommodation plans, please see, Employment Standard, Section 28,
Documented Individual Accommodation
Plans
“.

Section 31: Career Development and Advancement

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

31.(1) An employer that provides career development and advancement to its employees shall take into account the
accessibility needs of its employees with disabilities as well as any individual accommodation plans, when providing career
development and advancement to its employees with disabilities.

(2)In this section, “career development and advancement”includes providing additional
responsibilities within an employee’s current position and the movement of an employee from one job to another in
an organization that may be higher in pay, provide greater responsibility or be at a higher level in the organization or any
combination of them and, for both additional responsibilities and employee movement, is usually based on merit or seniority, or a
combination of them.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that employers that provide career development and advancement opportunities will take into
account the accessibility needs of their employees who have disabilities. This may provide employees with disabilities with the opportunities to advance within their organizations.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to all employers with one or more employees that provide career development and advancement to their
employees.

  • Government of Ontario and Legislative Assembly January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2016
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2017

Implementing the Requirement

Although an employee with a disability may be accommodated to perform a specific role, the employer may have other opportunities
for which the employee may be well-suited.

When providing career development and advancement opportunities, employers are required to take into account what accommodations
employees with disabilities may need to succeed elsewhere in their organizations or to take on new responsibilities in their current
position.

For example, an employee may receive a promotion, which includes new responsibilities. In this case, the employer and employee may
review the individual accommodation plan to learn what adjustments may be needed for the new responsibilities.

Career Development and Advancement and Individual Accommodation Plans

When employers provide career development and advancement opportunities to their employees, they must take into account the
individual accommodation plans that are in place for their employees with disabilities.

For more information on individual accommodation plans, please see, Employment Standard, Section 28,
Documented Individual Accommodation Plans
“.

Section 32: Redeployment

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

32.(1) An employer that uses redeployment shall take into account the accessibility needs of its employees with disabilities,
as well as individual accommodation plans, when redeploying employees with disabilities.

(2) In this section, “redeployment” means the
reassignment of employees to other departments or jobs within the organization as an alternative to layoff, when a particular job or
department has been eliminated by the organization.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all employers that use redeployment processes will consider the accessibility needs of
employees with disabilities when moving them to other positions, so that employees can continue to have their accommodation needs
met.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to all employers in Ontario with one or more employees.

  • Government of Ontario and Legislative Assembly January 1, 2013
  • Designated public sector organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2014
  • Designated public sector organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2015
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 50+ employees January 1, 2016
  • Private and not-for-profit organizations with 1-49 employees January 1, 2017

Implementing the Requirement

Employers that use redeployment are required to take into account the accessibility needs of employees with disabilities.

This includes reviewing individual accommodation plans when moving employees with disabilities to other jobs within their
organizations.

Large employers that have restructured, downsized or merged with other employers often redeploy their employees to other jobs. Many
of these employers have redeployment policies in place and human resources departments to oversee them.

The regulation does not require employers to create new processes for redeployment. It does require employers that redeploy
employees to consider the accessibility needs of individuals with disabilities and, if required, adjust their supports to fit their
new roles.

By considering the accessibility needs of individuals with disabilities when redeploying employees, employers may help these
employees continue to contribute effectively.

For example, if an employee with a disability has a modified cubicle or special software on their computer, then these
accommodations may follow the employee to the new position or are reassessed to determine if they still meet the
employee’ disability-related needs.

Redeployment and Individual Accommodation Plans

When organizations redeploy employees, they must take into account the individual accommodation plans that are in place for
their employees with disabilities, they should refer to their Individual Accommodation Plans and determine what modifications may
be needed to accommodate them in their new jobs.

For more information on individual accommodation plans, please see, Employment Standard, Section 28,
Documented Individual Accommodation
Plans
” .

Section 33: Definitions

Some of the terms defined here are in the Integrated Accessibility Standard Regulation. Others are not, but have been
included to help organizations understand and implement the requirements in the Accessible Transportation Standard.

accessibility equipment – equipment intended to remove barriers for people with disabilities. Accessibility equipment includes lifting devices, power lifts, power ramps, mobility aids, securement devices, etc.

accessibility features – features intended to remove barriers for people with disabilities. Accessibility
features include signage, accessible washrooms and automated communications systems, such as stop announcements on vehicles,
etc.

accessible taxicab – a taxicab as defined in section 1 of Regulation 629 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario,
1990 (Accessible Vehicles) made under the Highway Traffic Act.

allocated mobility aid space – refers to a
portion of a vehicle that is specifically designed and designated for the use of people with disabilities who use mobility aids.

bus – refers to a motor vehicle designed to carry 10 or more passengers and used for transporting people.

commuter rail – is a class of rail-based, multi-unit transportation. Commuter rail is used for public
passenger transportation between urban areas and their suburbs and is provided on designated lines between stations.

conventional transportation service provider – refers to a designated public sector
transportation organization as described in paragraph 5 of Schedule 1 of the Integrated Accessibility Standard Regulation. These
organizations provide conventional transportation services that operate only within Ontario.

conventional transportation services – refers to public passenger transportation services on transit buses, motor
coaches or rail-based transportation that operate only within Ontario. These services are provided by designated public sector
transportation organizations described in paragraph 5 of Schedule 1 of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation.

fare – is the fee paid by passengers allowing them to use public transportation such as a train, bus, ferry
etc.

fare structure – refers to the fare price. It is determined by the fare media such as cash, tickets, passes and
bulk quantity discounts and by the fare category such as adults, seniors and students. A fare structure does not include promotional
fares, which transportation service providers may offer from time to time.

ferry – refers to a vessel that weighs 1000 gross tonnes or more and provides passenger transportation services only within Ontario.
Ferries are used by the general public and may carry only passengers or passengers and motor vehicles.

grab bar – refers to any device on board a vehicle that is designed to allow passengers to grip or hold onto
it while they manoeuvre through the vehicle. Grab bars are also designed to provide passengers with more stable rides while on
board a vehicle.

handhold – refers to any device on board a vehicle that is designed to allow passengers to grip or hold onto
it while they manoeuvre through the vehicle. Handholds are also designed to provide passengers with more stable rides while on
board a vehicle.

handrail – refers to a narrow rail, which may be horizontal, vertical or angled that may be grasped as a support.
A handrail is designed to allow passengers to grip or hold on to it while they manoeuvre through the vehicle or to provide a more
stable ride while on board the vehicle.

inter-city rail – is a class of rail-based, multi-unit transportation that operates between cities or towns and
is used for public passenger transportation. Inter-city rail is intended for express service that covers long distances with routes
connecting two or more distinct or major locations.

lifting device – is a platform that moves between a lowered position that is usually level with the ground
and a raised position that is at the height of the floor inside the vehicle. These are generally used on motor coaches, located in the
middle of the vehicle.

light rail – is a class of rail-based, multi-unit transportation that is used for public passenger
transportation. Light rail transportation is provided on designated lines between stations and is intended for light loads and fast
movement.

medical aid – refers to an assistive device, including respirators and portable oxygen supplies.

mobility aid – refers to devices used to facilitate the transport, in a seated posture, of people with
disabilities.

mobility assistive device – refers to a cane, walker or similar aid.

motor coach – is a class of bus of monocoque design, which provides intercity, suburban or commuter passenger
transportation service. A motor coach has baggage storage areas that are separate from the passenger cabin.

personal information – refers to personal information within the meaning of the Freedom of Information and
Protection of Privacy Act.

portable bridge plate – is a device with a flat surface that spans the short distances between railcars and
loading platforms.

rail-based transportation – refers to any single or multi-unit passenger transportation vehicle that operates
exclusively on rails. Rail-based transportation includes streetcars, subways, light rail vehicles, commuter rail and
inter-city rail. Rail-based transportation is operated by a public transportation organization as described in paragraph 5 of Schedule
1 of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation.

ramp – refers to a sloped surface that moves between a retracted position to an extended position by flipping or
sliding the extension. Ramps are generally located at the accessible entrance door of a vehicle.

riser height – is the space between the rear base of a step and the top front edge of the next step.

school board – refers to a “board” as defined in subsection
1(1) of the Education Act.

specialized transportation service provider – refers to a designated public sector transportation organization,
described in paragraph 5 of Schedule 1 of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation that provides specialized
transportation services that operate only within Ontario.

specialized transportation services – refers to public passenger transportation services that are designed to
transport people with disabilities and that operate only within Ontario. These services are provided by designated public sector
transportation organizations as described in paragraph 5 of Schedule 1 of the Integrated Accessibility Standards
Regulation.

specialized transportation services – conditional eligibility – refers to the
designation given by specialized transportation service providers to people with disabilities who are unable to consistently use
conventional transportation services because of physical or environmental barriers.

specialized transportation services – temporary eligibility – refers to the designation given by
specialized transportation service providers to people with temporary disabilities that prevent them from using conventional
transportation services.

specialized transportation services – unconditional eligibility – refers to the designation given by
specialized transportation service providers to people with disabilities that prevent them from using conventional
transportation services.

stanchion – refers to a horizontal or vertical pole designed to be used as a handhold. It may be padded
to reduce or cushion the impact of any accidental contact.

step nosing – is the outward tip of a step
that is intended to assist with gripping and seeing the steps.

streetcar – is a class of rail-based transportation designed to operate on a highway, as defined in the
Highway Traffic Act.

subway – is a class of rail-based transportation, which is multi-unit and provides service on
designated lines between stations. A subway is designed to operate on a grade separated from highways, as defined in the Highway
Traffic Act.

support person – refers to a person who accompanies a person with a disability to help with communication,
mobility, personal care or medical needs, or with access to goods, services or facilities.

taxicab – is a motor vehicle as defined in the Highway Traffic Act that is licensed as a taxicab by a
municipality and has a seating capacity of not more than six people, not including the driver. A taxicab is hired for one
specific trip to transport one person or a group of people for which only one fare or charge is collected or made for the trip. A
taxicab is not a car pool vehicle.

transit bus – is a class of bus that is designed and intended to be used for passenger transportation.
Transit buses may be operated on highways, as defined in the Highway Traffic Act.

tread depth – is the horizontal stepping surface of a step.

Section 34: Availability of Information on Accessibility Equipment

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

34 (1) All conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers shall make available
to the public current information on accessibility equipment and features of their vehicles, routes and services.

(2) Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers shall, upon request,
provide the information described in subsection (1) in an accessible format.

(3) Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers shall meet the
requirements of this section by January 1, 2012.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all conventional and specialized transportation service providers provide the general
public with current information about their accessibility equipment and the accessibility features of their vehicles, routes and
services.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers. Both
must meet these requirements by January 1, 2012.

Implementing the Requirement

Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers are required to make publicly
available their current information on the accessibility equipment and accessibility features of their vehicles, routes and
services.

Accessible Formats

When requested, conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers are required to
provide the information on their accessibility equipment and the accessibility features of their vehicles, routes and services in
accessible formats.

For more information on accessible formats, please go to the glossary , which gives a general description. For more detailed information, go to Information and Communications Standard, Section 12, “Accessible Formats and Communication Supports

Section 35: Non-Functioning Accessibility Equipment

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

35 (1) If the accessibility equipment on a vehicle is not functioning and equivalent service cannot be provided, conventional
transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers shall take reasonable steps to accommodate
persons with disabilities who would otherwise use the equipment and the transportation service provider shall repair the equipment as
soon as is practicable.

(2) Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers shall meet the
requirements of this section by July 1, 2011.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation
service providers will accommodate people with disabilities when the accessibility equipment on the vehicles breaks down.

Further, conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers must repair
accessibility equipment that is broken as soon as it is practicable.

When do Organizations have to Comply

All conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers must meet these
requirements by July 1, 2011.

Implementing the Requirement

When the accessibility equipment on a vehicle is damaged, not working properly or not working at all, conventional transportation
service providers and specialized transportation service providers must repair the equipment as soon as is practicable.

They must also take reasonable steps to accommodate people with disabilities who would otherwise use the equipment.

Section 36: Accessibility Training

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

36 (1) In addition to the training requirements set out in section 7, conventional transportation service providers and
specialized transportation service providers shall conduct employee and volunteer accessibility training.

(2) The accessibility training shall include training on,

  • the safe use of accessibility equipment and features;
  • acceptable modifications to procedures in situations where temporary barriers exist or
    accessibility equipment on a vehicle fails;and
  • emergency preparedness and response procedures that provide for the safety of persons with
    disabilities.

(3) Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers shall keep a record of
the training provided under this section, including the dates on which the training is provided and the number of individuals to
whom it is provided.

(4) Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers shall meet the
requirements of this section by January 1, 2014.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation
service providers will provide transportation-specific accessibility training for employees and volunteers, as it relates
to their positions.

This training is in addition to the general training required under the General Requirement part of the Integrated Accessibility
Standards Regulation. For more information on this training, please go to General Requirement, Section 7,
Training” .

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers must meet this requirement by
January 1, 2014.

Implementing the Requirement

Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers must conduct accessibility
training to their employees and volunteers.

Training Schedule

Under this requirement, conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers can
build their accessibility training into their existing policies and cycles.

Further, transportation providers have the flexibility to decide what type of training is required (e.g., classroom, e-learning,
etc.) and when they will offer it. They can, for instance, build the training into their existing training processes and schedules,
including their “refresher” training.

Training Records

Transportation providers are required to keep records of the training that is provided.

These records must include the dates that the training is provided, as well as the number of individuals that receive the
training.

Content

Accessibility training must include training in the following areas.

Safe use of equipment

Training should include how to safely use the accessibility equipment and features on vehicles. This could also include the
safe handling and storage of mobility aids such as wheelchairs, and mobility assistive devices such as walkers.

Barriers to accessibility or failure of accessibility equipment

Training should include what modifications to the regular procedures are acceptable when the accessibility equipment fails or
when temporary barriers to accessibility arise. This will help operators to manage those situations when unplanned procedures or
processes are necessary to assist people with disabilities properly and safely.

Procedures for emergencies

Training should include information on how the transportation provider has prepared for emergencies and what the procedures are
to help people with disabilities in those situations. This will help operators to manage and respond appropriately to the needs of
people with disabilities in emergency situations.

Section 37: Emergency Preparedness and Response Policies

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

37 (1) In addition to any obligations that a conventional transportation service provider or a specialized transportation
service provider has under section 13, conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service
providers,

  • shall establish, implement, maintain and document emergency preparedness and
    response policies that provide for the safety of persons with disabilities; and
  • shall make those policies available to the public.

(2) Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers shall, upon request,
provide the policies described in subsection (1) in an accessible format.

(3) Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers shall meet the
requirements of this section by January 1, 2012.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation
service providers will have emergency preparedness and response policies that will provide for the safety of people with
disabilities.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers must meet these requirements by
January 1, 2012.

Implementing the Requirement

Developing Policies

Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers must establish, implement,
maintain and document emergency preparedness and response policies that provide for the safety of people with disabilities.

These emergency policies will offer greater accountability to people with disabilities as well as to other passengers when
emergencies arise. This is in addition to the requirements for plans for emergency procedures and for information about public
safety, which are described in the Information and Communications Standard of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation. For
more information about those plans and procedures, please go to the Information and Communications Standard, Section 13,
Emergency Procedure, Plans or Public Safety Information“.

Availability to Public

Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers must make their emergency
preparedness and response policies available to the public.

Further, when requested, these emergency preparedness and response policies must be provided in an accessible format.

For more information on accessible formats, please go to the glossary, which gives a general description. For more detailed
information, go to Information and Communications Standard, Section 12, “Accessible Formats and Communication
Supports
” .

Section 38: Fares, Support Persons

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

38 (1) No conventional transportation service provider and no specialized transportation service provider shall charge a fare to
a support person who is accompanying a person with a disability where the person with a disability has a need for a support
person.

(2) It is the responsibility of a person with a disability to demonstrate to a transportation service provider described in
subsection (1) their need for a support person to accompany them on the conventional or specialized transportation service and to
ensure that the appropriate designation for a support person is in place.

(3) Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers shall meet the
requirements of this section by January 1, 2014.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that no conventional transportation service provider or specialized transportation
service provider will charge a fare to a support person who is accompanying a person with a disability on a transportation vehicle
when the person with a disability has a need for a support person to travel with them.

When do Organizations have to Comply

All conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers must meet these
requirements by January 1, 2014.

Implementing the Requirement

No Fare Charged

Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers cannot charge a fare to a support
person who is accompanying a person with a disability, when the person with a disability has a need for a support person to travel
with them.

This requirement recognizes that a person with a disability may require the assistance of a support person while travelling. For
example, the support person may help the person with a disability board the vehicle, pay the fare or provide personal care when
travelling.

Demonstrating the Need for a Support Person

A person with a disability who requires a support person while travelling must demonstrate the need to the conventional transportation service provider or the specialized transportation service provider. How the person with a disability demonstrates
this need is at the discretion of each provider.

Giving the Designation

The designation that allows a support person to travel without paying a fare is given to the person with a disability. It is not
given to the support person.

This provision recognizes that a person with a disability has the need for a support person, not the need for a specific support person. Further, a person with a disability may use more than one support person for travelling over the course of a week, a month or
a year.

Example: A woman with a disability may require the help of a paid support person to travel to work. In the evenings and during
the weekends, however, her partner may be able to act as her support person.

Section 39: Transition – Existing Contracts

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

39. Where a conventional transportation service provider has, on June 30, 2011, existing contractual obligations to purchase
vehicles that do not meet the requirements of sections 53 to 62, the transportation service provider may honour the existing
contract.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is to permit conventional transportation service providers to honour their existing contracts
to purchase vehicles that do not meet the technical requirements of this regulation.

The requirement recognizes that conventional transportation service providers may be penalized if they ask for changes after
contracts have been signed.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to all conventional transportation service providers. It is a transitional requirement and does not
have a date for compliance.

Implementing the Requirement

Conventional transportation service providers may honour a contract signed on or before June 30, 2011 to buy vehicles that do
not meet the technical requirements outlined in Sections 53 to 62 of this regulation.

This requirement recognizes that conventional transportation service providers could be penalized for requesting changes to a
contract after it has been signed, payment has been made or production has begun.

Any contracts signed on or after July 1, 2011 must include the requirements of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation,
subject to certain exemptions where the structural integrity of the vehicle may be impaired.

For more information about the technical requirements, please go to Transportation, Sections 53 to 62 “Technical Requirements”.

Section 40: Transition – Existing Vehicles

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

40 (1) Conventional transportation service providers are not required to retrofit vehicles that are within their fleet as of
July 1, 2011 in order to ensure that the vehicles meet the accessibility requirements of sections 53 to 62.

(2) If a conventional transportation service provider modifies a portion of a vehicle to which subsection (1) applies in a way that
affects or could affect accessibility on or after July 1, 2011, the transportation service provider shall ensure that the modified
portion meets the requirements of sections 53 to 62.

(3) Where subsection (2) applies and the modification is with respect to matters referred to in section 53, 55, 57 or 61 or
subsection 62 (2), the conventional transportation service provider does not have to meet the requirements of those provisions if the
modifications would impair the structural integrity of the vehicle or the mobility aid accessible rail car.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is to exempt conventional transportation service providers from retrofitting their fleet
while ensuring that new acquisitions meet the technical requirements of this regulation.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to all conventional transportation service providers. It is a transitional requirement, and does not
have a compliance date.

Implementing the Requirement

No Retrofit Requirement

Conventional transportation service providers are not required to retrofit the vehicles that are in their fleets as of July 1,
2011 to meet the technical requirements in the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation. The regulation applies on a
go-forward basis to purchases of new and used vehicles.

A vehicle is considered to be in the fleet of a transportation service provider if the vehicle was owned by the provider on or
before June 30, 2011.

Requirements Regarding Modifications/Upgrades

On or after July 1, 2011, if a conventional transportation service provider modifies or upgrades a portion of a vehicle, the
new features must meet the accessibility requirements outlined in the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation.

This requirement applies to any modifications or upgrades to the vehicles or their equipment that fall under the technical
requirements of the regulation.

Example: In September 2011, a conventional transportation service provider decides to upgrade its bus fleet by replacing all
the signage. These new signs must meet the requirements for signage outlined in the regulation. The conventional transportation service
provider, however, is not required to retrofit other parts of the bus fleet such as the steps or lighting to meet the requirements of
the regulation. Only those parts of the bus fleet that the provider changes have to meet the requirements.

Exemption

Structural Integrity

Conventional transportation service providers are not required to meet the technical requirements in the regulation under the
following circumstances:

  • When upgrades to the requirements in the regulation compromise or harm the structural integrity of a vehicle.
  • When upgrades to the requirements in the regulation compromise or harm the structural integrity of a rail car that is accessible
    to people with disabilities who use mobility aids.

Example: A conventional transportation service provider has decided to upgrade the grab bars, handholds, handrails and
stanchions in all its commuter trains. The upgrade will replace the worn padding. The provider is not required to meet the
accessibility requirements for the placement of handrails, grab bars, handholds and stanchions if doing so would harm the
structural integrity of the vehicles.

There are five requirements that are eligible for the structural integrity exemption:

  • grab bars, handholds, handrails and stanchions
  • allocated mobility aid spaces
  • lighting features
  • indicators and alarms
  • mobility aid accessible washrooms on rail cars

For more information about these requirements, please go to Transportation:

Section 41: Accessibility Plans – Conventional Transportation Services

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

41 (1) In addition to the accessibility plan requirements set out in section 4, in their accessibility plan, conventional
transportation service providers shall identify the process for managing, evaluating and taking action on customer feedback.

(2) Every conventional transportation service provider shall annually hold at least one public meeting involving persons with
disabilities to ensure that they have an opportunity to participate in a review of the accessibility plan and that they are given the
opportunity to provide feedback on the accessibility plan.

(3) If the provider of conventional transportation services also provides specialized transportation services, the transportation
service provider shall address both types of transportation services in its accessibility plan.

(4) Transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2013.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that conventional transportation service providers will identify in their
accessibility plans, their processes for managing and acting on the customer feedback they receive about their services for people with
disabilities.

In addition, conventional transportation service providers must hold at least one annual public meeting to give people with
disabilities a chance to participate in reviews of the accessibility plans.

When do Organizations Have to Comply

This requirement applies to conventional transportation service providers. They must comply by January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

Customer Feedback

Conventional transportation service providers must identify their processes for managing, evaluating and acting on customer
feedback.

Customer feedback gives the conventional transportation service providers the chance to learn about the concerns of people with
disabilities and about the obstacles they face when using transportation services.

The feedback also allows people with disabilities to respond to advances and improvements in accessibility.

Determining customer satisfaction will help conventional transportation service providers to steadily improve their
equipment and services for people with disabilities.

Public Meetings

Conventional transportation service providers must hold at least one annual public meeting that includes and involves people with
disabilities.

These meetings will give conventional transportation service providers opportunities to receive customer feedback on their
accessibility plans.

The meetings will also make sure that people with disabilities can participate in the annual reviews of accessibility plans.

There is no requirement that these meetings must be for the sole purpose of receiving feedback on accessibility plans. Conventional
transportation service providers may also choose to seek feedback on other issues relating to accessibility during the meetings.

Providers of both Conventional and Specialized Services

If the conventional transportation service provider also provides specialized transportation services, then it must address
both types of transportation services in its accessibility plan.

This recognizes that one accessibility plan for both types of services benefits staff members and people with disabilities.

Other Accessibility Plan Requirements

Conventional transportation service providers have other accessibility plan requirements under the Integrated Accessibility
Standards Regulation.

For more information on accessibility plans, go to General Requirements, Section 4, “Accessibility
Plans
“.

Section 42: Accessibility Plans – Specialized Transportation Services

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

42 (1) Specialized transportation service providers shall, in their accessibility plans,

  • identify the process for estimating the demand for specialized transportation services; and
  • develop steps to reduce wait times for specialized transportation services.

(2) Specialized transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2013.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that specialized transportation service providers will identify, in their
accessibility plan, how they will estimate the demand for specialized transportation. They will also outline what steps they
will take to reduce the waiting times for their services.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to specialized transportation service providers. They must comply by January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

Estimating Demand

Within their multi-year accessibility plans, specialized transportation service providers must identify the processes they
plan to use to estimate the demand for specialized transportation services in their jurisdictions.

Estimating demand will assist specialized transportation service providers to align their services to better match the demand.

Reducing Waiting Times

Within the multi-year accessibility plans, specialized transportation service providers must outline the steps they will
take to reduce the wait times for their services. This is the time that people with disabilities spend waiting for scheduled pick-ups
by specialized transportation vehicles. It does not refer to waiting times during the process to determine an
individual’s eligibility for specialized transportation services.

Other Accessibility Plan Requirements

Specialized transportation service providers have other accessibility plan requirements under the Integrated Accessibility
Standards Regulation. For more information on accessibility plans, go to General Requirements, Section 4,
Accessibility Plans “.

Section 43: Accessibility Plans – Conventional and Specialized Transportation Services

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

43 (1) Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers shall, in their
accessibility plans, describe their procedures for dealing with accessibility equipment failures on their respective types of
vehicles.

(2) Transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2013.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation
service providers explain in their accessibility plans what they will do when their accessibility equipment on their vehicles
fails.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers. They
must comply by January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

In their accessibility plans, convetional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers
must explain how they will deal with failures of the accessibility equipment on their vehicles.

This requirement means that the people with disabilities will know what to expect when the accessibility equipment does not
work.

Other Accessibility Plan Requirements

Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers have other accessibility plan
requirements under the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation.

For more information on accessibility plans, go to General Requirements, Section 4, “Accessibility Plans“.

Section 44: General Responsibilities

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

44 (1) Conventional transportation service providers shall,

  • deploy lifting devices, ramps or portable bridge plates upon the request of a person with a
    disability;
  • ensure that adequate time is provided to persons with disabilities to safely board, be secured and deboard transportation vehicles and that assistance be provided, upon request, for these activities;
  • assist with safe and careful storage of mobility aids or mobility assistive devices used
    by persons with disabilities; and
  • allow a person with a disability to travel with a medical aid.

(2) Conventional transportation service providers shall, upon request, make information on the matters referred to in subsection
(1) available in an accessible format.

(3) Conventional transportation service providers shall comply with the requirements of this section by January 1, 2012.

(4) In this section, “medical aid” means an assistive device including respirators
and portable oxygen supplies.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that conventional transportation service providers will assist people with
disabilities.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to conventional transportation service providers. They must comply by January 1, 2012.

Implementing the Requirement

Conventional transportation service providers are required to assist people with disabilities in the following situations.

Using Ramps, Bridge Plates and Lifts

When requested, operators must deploy or put in place the ramps, portable bridge plates or lifting devices that are used to help
people with disabilities board or deboard vehicles.

This requirement does not apply to those vehicles, such as subways, that do not have lifting devices, ramps or portable bridge
plates.

Providing Adequate Time

Operators must provide enough time for people with disabilities to safely board and deboard the vehicles, as well as to secure
mobility aids. Operators must also provide assistance for these activities, when requested.

For those vehicles with no securement devices, such as subway cars, the requirement to secure mobility aids does not apply.

Note: This requirement does not exempt operators from any other specific responsibilities required by conventional transportation
service providers as outlined in other legislation or policies regarding safety.

Safe Storage of Mobility Aids and Mobility Assistive Devices

Operators must help safely store the mobility aids or mobility assistive devices used by people with disabilities.

This is required when storage space is available on the vehicle, and if the person with the disability does not require the mobility
aid or the mobility assistive device while on the vehicle.

Mobility aids and mobility assistive devices are safely stored when they are secure and cannot move in such a way that they would
be damaged or that they trip or harm other passengers.

Allowing Medical Aids

Operators must allow people with disabilities to travel with medical aids such as respirators and portable oxygen supplies.

Ensuring Safety

The requirements outlined in this section do not supersede the rights of operators regarding their personal safety or the safety
of other passengers as outlined in the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

Providing Accessible Information

If requested, conventional transportation service providers must provide information about the responsibilities of their operators
in accessible formats.

For more information on accessible formats, please go to the Glossary, which gives a general description. For more detailed information, go to Information and Communications Standard, Section 12, “Accessible Formats and Communication
Supports
” .

Section 45: Alternative Accessible Method of Transportation

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

45 (1) Except where not practicable to do so, a conventional transportation service provider that does not provide specialized
transportation services shall ensure that any person with a disability who, because of his or her disability, is unable to use
conventional transportation services is provided with an alternative accessible method of transportation.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply where specialized transportation services are provided by a specialized
transportation service provider in the same jurisdiction where the conventional transportation service provider provides
transportation services.

(3) Conventional transportation service providers shall comply with the requirements of this section by January 1, 2013.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that conventional transportation service providers offer people with disabilities an
alternative accessible method of transportation if they cannot use conventional transportation services as a result of their
disability, and if there is no specialized transportation service in the area.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to conventional transportation service providers. They must comply by January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

Alternative Accessible Method of Transportation

Conventional transportation service providers that do not provide specialized transportation services must provide people
with disabilities, who cannot use the conventional service, with an alternative accessible method of transportation. This requirement
applies under the following circumstances:

  • When there is no specialized transportation service available in the area.
  • The person with a disability cannot use the conventional service because of his or her disability and not for other reasons,
    such as lack of adequate funds or the schedules are inconvenient.

This requirement does not mean that conventional transportation service providers must create a separate and dedicated specialized
service. The requirement means that people with disabilities are provided with alternative accessible transportation.

Exemptions

In some cases, there may be a specialized transportation service available in the municipality or region. In this situation, the
conventional transportation service provider does not have to offer an alternate accessible method of transportation as an accessible
service is available from another source or provider.

In other cases, it may not be practicable for conventional transportation service providers to provide alternative accessible
transportation to people with disabilities. In these cases, the provider is not required to do so.

Example: A person with a disability is discharged from the hospital and requires transportation from the hospital to his home.
His disability requires that he be transported on a gurney. In this situation, the conventional transportation service provider may not
be required to provide an alternative accessible method of transportation as even a typical specialized transportation vehicle
cannot be used to transport a person on a gurney.

What is being requested here is a special type of trip, not a comparable accessible alternative. In this case, it is the
responsibility of the person with a disability to arrange transportation that accommodates his or her unique needs.

Section 46: Fares

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

46 (1) No conventional transportation service provider shall charge a higher fare to a person with a disability than the fare
that is charged to a person without a disability where the person with a disability uses conventional transportation services, but a
conventional transportation service provider may charge a lesser fare for a person with a disability.

(2) Conventional transportation service providers that do not provide specialized transportation services shall make available
alternative fare payment options to persons with disabilities who cannot, because of their disability, use a fare payment option.

(3) Conventional transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of subsection (1) by July 1, 2011 and the requirements
of subsection (2) by January 1, 2013.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that no conventional transportation service provider will charge people with
disabilities more than people without disabilities for the same trip.

In addition, conventional transportation service providers must offer accessible fare payment options.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers must comply with the fare portion of the requirement by July 1, 2011.

Conventional transportation service providers must comply with the requirement for accessible fare payment options by January 1,
2013.

Implementing the Requirement

Fares

A conventional transportation service provider cannot charge people with disabilities higher fares than it charges people
without disabilities for the same trip. Conventional transportation service providers, however, are allowed to charge people with
disabilities lower fares than those charged to people without disabilities.

Accessible Fare Payment Options

Conventional transportation service providers that do not provide specialized transportation services must have alternative
accessible options for paying fares for people with disabilities, who because of their disabilities cannot use the commonly used
methods for paying fares.

Example: Some people with disabilities may have trouble placing coins or tokens into fare boxes, while others may have problems
with the machines used for purchasing tickets. Conventional transportation service providers must remove these barriers to
their services by offering accessible options for paying fares.

Section 47: Transit Stops

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

47(1) Conventional transportation service providers, in respect of transportation vehicles to which this section applies, shall
ensure that persons with disabilities are able to board or deboard a transportation vehicle at the closest available safe location, as
determined by the operator, that is not an official stop, if the official stop is not accessible and the safe location is along the
same transit route.

(2) In determining where a safe location may be situated for the purposes of subsection (1), the conventional transportation service
provider shall give consideration to the preferences of the person with a disability.

(3) Conventional transportation service providers shall ensure that operators of their transportation vehicles promptly report to
an appropriate authority where a transit stop is temporarily inaccessible or where a temporary barrier exists.

(4) This section applies in respect of the following:

  • Transit buses
  • Motor coaches
  • Streetcars

(5) Conventional transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2012.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that when official stops are not accessible, conventional transportation service providers will
allow people with disabilities to board and deboard the vehicles at safe locations that are not official stops.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers.

Applies to the following vehicles:

  • transit buses
  • motor coaches
  • streetcars

January 1, 2012

Implementing the Requirement

Who Decides

When official transit stops have barriers or are not accessible, conventional transportation service providers must allow people
with disabilities to board or deboard their vehicles at the closest safe location.

It is the operators of the vehicles who will decide what is the closest and safest place to stop, taking into consideration the
preferences of the person with the disability.

Operators must also take into account two other factors:

  • The unofficial stop must be on the same transit route.
  • The operators of the vehicles must be able to safely operate any accessibility equipment required by people with disabilities to
    board or deboard the vehicles.

What vehicles

This requirement only applies to conventional transportation service providers that operate transit buses, motor coaches, and
streetcars.

These vehicles, unlike subways, are not required to stop at every official transit stop. Streetcars, transit buses and motor
coaches only stop when there are people waiting at the stops who want to board or people on the vehicles who want to get off.

Barriers

Conventional transportation service providers must make sure that their operators of transit buses, motor coaches and streetcars
report transit stops that are temporarily inaccessible.

Operators must promptly report inaccessible transit stops, to the appropriate authority when they determine that there is a
barrier at a stop. For example, they may call over the radio, or they may tell their supervisors at the end of their shifts or when
they return to their stations. The appropriate authority could be, for example, the transportation service provider or the
municipality.

Example: An operator of a transit bus notices a large crack in the sidewalk in front of the transit stop. The operator decides to
stop the bus several metres away from the official transit stop so that people with disabilities can board and deboard safely.

Section 48: Storage of Mobility Aids and Mobility Assistive Devices

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

48(1) Every conventional transportation service provider shall, if safe storage is possible, ensure that mobility aids and mobility
assistive devices are stored in the passenger compartments of its transportation vehicles within reach of the person with the
disability who uses the aid or device.

(2) If safe storage of mobility aids and mobility assistive devices is not possible within the passenger compartment and the
vehicle is equipped with a baggage compartment, a conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that mobility aids and
mobility assistive devices are stored in the baggage compartment of the vehicle on which the person with the disability is
travelling.

(3) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that operators of its transportation vehicles secure and
return mobility aids and mobility assistive devices in a manner that does not affect the safety of other passengers and does not
cause damage to the aid or device, where the mobility aid or mobility assistive device is stored in the baggage compartment of
the vehicle.

(4) No conventional transportation service provider shall charge a fee for the storage of a mobility aid or a mobility assistive
device.

(5) This section applies in respect of the following:

  • Transit buses
  • Motor coaches
  • Streetcars
  • Subways
  • Light rail
  • Commuter rail
  • Inter-city rail

(6) Subject to subsection (7), conventional transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of this section by
January 1, 2012.

(7) Conventional transportation service providers shall comply with subsection (4) by July 1, 2011.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that conventional transportation service providers will store and return mobility
aids and mobility assistive devices to people with disabilities who use them.

This requirement does not allow conventional transportation service providers to charge fees for storing mobility aids and
mobility assistive devices.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers.

Applies to the following vehicles:

  • transit buses
  • motor coaches
  • street cars
  • subways
  • light rail
  • commuter rail
  • inter-city rail

Requirement concerning storage by January 1, 2012.

Requirement concerning fees for storage by July 1, 2011.

Implementing this Requirement

Storage in Passenger Compartments

In some vehicles, the passenger compartments have areas where mobility aids and mobility assistive devices can be stored safely.
If this is the case, then conventional transportation service providers must make sure that mobility aids and mobility assistive
devices are stored within reach of the people with disabilities who use them. For example, a walker may be placed beside the passenger
who uses it or at her feet.

Storing in Baggage Compartments

In other vehicles, the baggage compartments are the only places where mobility aids or mobility assistive devices can be stored
safely.

In these cases, conventional transportation service providers must make sure that mobility aids and mobility assistive devices
are stored on the same vehicles on which the people with disabilities are travelling.

When conventional transportation service providers use the baggage compartments to store mobility aids or mobility assistive
devices, they must be safely secured. Further, they must be returned to the people with disabilities in a manner that does not
affect the safety of the other passengers or damage the aids or devices.

Note: This requirement does not require a dedicated location for storage. Conventional transportation service providers are not
required to have or to dedicate separate storage areas if the vehicles do not have them already. Safe storage could simply
involve placing the devices beside people with disabilities or at their feet.

Charging Fees

Conventional transportation service providers cannot charge fees for storing mobility aids or mobility assistive devices.

This applies when mobility aids or mobility assistive devices are stored in passenger compartments or in baggage
compartments.

Section 49: Courtesy Seating

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

49 (1) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that there is clearly marked courtesy seating for persons
with disabilities on its transportation vehicles and that the courtesy seating meets the standards set out in this section.

(2) The courtesy seating for persons with disabilities shall be located as close as practicable to the entrance door of the
vehicle.

(3) The courtesy seating for persons with disabilities shall be signed to indicate that passengers, other than persons with
disabilities, must vacate the courtesy seating if its use is required by a person with a disability.

(4) Every conventional transportation service provider shall develop a communications strategy designed to inform the public
about the purpose of courtesy seating.

(5) This section applies in respect of the following:

  • Transit buses
  • Motor coaches
  • Streetcars
  • Subways
  • Light rail
  • Commuter rail
  • Inter-city rail

(6) Conventional transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2012.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that conventional transportation service providers will have seats that are
designated for people with disabilities and are located as close as practicable to the entrance door.

Further, conventional transportation service providers will develop communications strategies to inform the public about the
purpose of these seats.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers.

Applies to the following vehicles:

  • transit buses
  • motor coaches
  • street cars
  • subways
  • light rail
  • commuter rail
  • inter-city rail

January 1, 2012

Implementing the Requirement

Clearly Marked Seating

Conventional transportation service providers must make sure that each of their vehicles has seating that is clearly marked as
intended for people with disabilities.

The style or symbol used to mark the seating is up to the conventional transportation service provider. But, they must make
sure that the signs for the seats tell people without disabilities that they have to leave these seats when they are needed by people
with disabilities.

Operators are not required to ask people without disabilities to vacate seats for people with disabilities.

Note: Some conventional transportation service providers may have “courtesy” or
“priority” seating for seniors, expectant mothers, or passengers with small children. These
providers are not required to eliminate this seating for other passengers in need, but are required to have seating specifically
designated for people with disabilities.

Location

Seating for people with disabilities must be accessible and located as close as practicable to the entrances of the
vehicles.

If the closest seats to the entrance door are not accessible or would pose a barrier to people with disabilities then they
– the seats – are not practical and should not be designated as seating for people with
disabilities. Instead the conventional transportation service provider should designate seats which are accessible and as close
as practicable to the entrance doors.

Communications Strategy

Conventional transportation service providers must develop a communications strategy to inform the public about the purpose of
this seating for people with disabilities.

Section 50: Service Disruptions

Requirement as stated in the Regulation

50 (1) Where a route or scheduled service is temporarily changed and the change is known in advance of the commencement of the trip,
conventional transportation service providers shall,

  • make available alternate accessible arrangements to transfer persons with disabilities to
    their route destination where alternate arrangements for persons without disabilities are inaccessible; and
  • ensure information on alternate arrangements is communicated in a manner that takes into
    account the person’s disability.

(2) This section applies in respect of the following:

  • Transit buses
  • Motor coaches
  • Streetcars
  • Subways
  • Light rail
  • Commuter rail
  • Inter-city rail

(3) Conventional transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of this section by July 1, 2013.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that when conventional transportation service providers know of a service disruption in
advance, they will make alternative arrangements for accessible transportation for people with disabilities.

The providers will also make sure the arrangements are communicated to people with disabilities in an accessible
format.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers.

Applies to the following vehicles:

  • transit buses
  • motor coaches
  • street cars
  • subways
  • light rail
  • commuter rail
  • inter-city rail

July 1, 2013

Implementing the Requirement

Route Changes Known in Advance

When conventional transportation service providers know of a route or scheduled service change in advance of the start of the
trip, they are required to arrange for accessible transportation to get people with disabilities to their route destinations if the
alternative arrangement for people without disabilities is not accessible.

The following are examples of temporary route or scheduled service changes that are known in advance.

  • A bus detours because streets have been closed for a summer street festival.
  • Repairs at a subway station mean the subway will not stop there for a day.
  • The commuter train will arrive on Platform B instead of Platform A.

The following are examples of temporary route or scheduled service changes that are unexpected:

  • A car accident means that buses must take a detour and miss four official transit stops on the regular route.
  • A flood from a water-main break requires the subways to run through a station without stopping.
  • Rail blockade requires commuter trains to stop and stay put on route.

In the event of a service disruption, this requirement does not guarantee that people with disabilities can get to a specific
location at their intended destination. For example, if a section of a road is closed down because of a police investigation, then
the conventional transportation service provider cannot guarantee that a person with a disability will get to a bank that is located
in the blocked off area.

Accessible Information

Conventional transportation service providers are required to make sure that the information on alternative arrangements is
communicated in a manner that takes into account the person’s disability.

For more information on accessible formats, please go to the Glossary , which gives a general description. For more detailed
information, go to Information and Communications Standard, Section 12, “Accessible Formats and Communication
Supports”
.

Section 51: Pre-Boarding Announcements

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

51(1) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that there are, on request, pre-boarding verbal
announcements of the route, direction, destination or next major stop.

(2) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that there are electronic pre-boarding announcements of the
route, direction, destination or next major stop on its transportation vehicles and that that these announcements satisfy
the requirements set out in section 58.

(3) This section applies in respect of the following:

  • Transit buses
  • Motor coaches
  • Streetcars
  • Subways
  • Light rail
  • Commuter rail
  • Inter-city rail

(4) Conventional transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of subsection (1) by July 1, 2011 and the requirements
of subsection (2) by January 1, 2017.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that conventional transportation service providers will make sure that information
about the route, direction, destination or next major stop is provided to people with disabilities before they board the
vehicles.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers.

Applies to the following vehicles:

  • transit buses
  • motor coaches
  • street cars
  • subways
  • light rail
  • commuter rail
  • inter-city rail

Requirement concerning the spoken pre-boarding announcements by July 1, 2011.

Requirement concerning the electronic pre-boarding announcements by January 1, 2017.

Implementing the Requirement

Verbal Requirements

When requested, conventional transportation service providers will provide spoken pre-boarding announcements of the routes,
directions, destinations or next major stops of their vehicles.

Electronic Requirements

Conventional transportation service providers must provide electronic pre-boarding announcements of the routes, directions,
destinations or next major stops of their vehicles.

This information must be electronically announced at the boarding point.

All electronic announcements must meet the requirements for signage in the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation. For
more information on the requirements for signs, please go to Transportation, Section 58,
Signage“.

Section 52: On-Board Announcements

Requirement as stated in the Regulation

52(1) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that there are audible verbal announcements of all
destination points or available route stops on its transportation vehicles while the vehicle is on route or while the vehicle is
being operated.

(2) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that all destination points or available route stops,

  • are announced through electronic means; and
  • are legibly and visually displayed through electronic means.

(3) For the purposes of clause (2) (b), visual displays of destination points or stop information shall satisfy the
requirements set out in section 58.

(4) This section applies in respect of the following:

  • Transit buses
  • Motor coaches
  • Streetcars
  • Subways
  • Light rail
  • Commuter rail
  • Inter-city rail

(5) Conventional transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of subsection (1) by July 1, 2011 and the requirements
of subsections (2) and (3) by January 1, 2017.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that conventional transportation service providers will make sure that all the
destination points or stops are announced on all vehicles while they are travelling along their routes or being operated.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers.

Applies to the following vehicles:

  • transit buses
  • motor coaches
  • street cars
  • subways
  • light rail
  • commuter rail
  • inter-city rail

Requirement concerning audible on-board announcements by July 1, 2011.

Requirement concerning electronic on board announcements by January 1, 2017.

Implementing the Requirement

Verbal Requirements

Conventional transportation service providers must make sure that all destination points or stops are audibly announced on board
their vehicles while they are travelling.

This requirement does not apply if the vehicle is empty or if the information is provided electronically through automated
announcements.

Electronic Requirements

Conventional transportation service providers must make sure that all destination points or stops are electronically announced
on board their vehicles while they are travelling.

The information must be announced over automated announcement systems, and legibly displayed electronically.

For example, the next stop of “Queen Street” must be audibly communicated through an
electronic system, as well as legibly displayed on an electronic system. This means that passengers have the option of reading or hearing “Queen Street”.

Electronic announcements must meet signage requirements outlined in the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation. For more
information on the requirements for signs, please go to Transportation, Section 58,
Signage” .

Section 53: Grab Bars, Handholds, Handrails, Stanchions

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

53(1) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that all of its transportation vehicles to which this
section applies that are manufactured on or after January 1, 2013 are equipped with grab bars, handholds, handrails or stanchions
that are provided where appropriate at,

  • locations where passengers are required to pay fares;
  • each mobility aid securement position;
  • each courtesy seating area intended for use by persons with disabilities; and
  • each side of any entrance or exit used by persons with disabilities.

(2) With respect to all transportation vehicles to which this section applies, every conventional transportation service provider
shall ensure that grab bars, handholds, handrails or stanchions located at an entrance or exit used by a person with a disability
are accessible from ground level and are mounted so that they are inside the vehicle when the doors are closed.

(3) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that all vehicles to which this section applies meet the
following standards:

  • The location of grab bars, handholds, handrails or stanchions must be distributed, as appropriate to the vehicle’ design, throughout the vehicle to support independent and safe boarding, on-board circulation,
    seating and standing assistance and deboarding for persons with disabilities.
  • Grab bars, handholds, handrails or stanchions must not interfere with the turning and manoeuvring space required for
    mobility aids to reach the allocated space from the entrance.
  • Grab bars, handholds, handrails or stanchions must be high colour-contrasted with their background to assist with visual
    recognition.
  • Every grab bar, handhold, handrail or stanchion must,
    • be sturdy, rounded and free of any sharp or abrasive element,
    • have an exterior diameter that permits easy grasping by the full range of passengers and
      sufficient clearance from the surface to which it is attached,
    • be designed to prevent catching or snagging of clothes or personal items, and
    • have a slip resistant surface.
  • Where grab bars, handholds, handrails or stanchions return to a wall or floor, they must do so in a smooth curve.
  • Brackets, clamps, screw heads or other fasteners used on grab bars, handholds, handrails or stanchions must be rounded or flush
    with the surface and free from burrs or rough edges.

(4) This section applies in respect of the following:

  • Transit buses
  • Motor coaches
  • Streetcars
  • Subways
  • Light rail
  • Commuter rail
  • Inter-city rail

(5) Despite subsection (4), this section does not apply to vehicles regulated under Regulation 629 of the Revised Regulations
of Ontario, 1990 (Vehicles for the Transportation of Physically Disabled Passengers) made under the Highway Traffic Act.

(6) Despite subsection (1), where a conventional transportation service provider enters into a contractual obligation to purchase
new or used vehicles of a type referenced in subsection (4) on or after July 1, 2011, the transportation service provider shall
ensure the vehicles meet the requirements of this section.

(7) Subsection (6) does not apply if the installation of the
grab bars, handholds, handrails or stanchions would impair the structural integrity of the vehicle.

The Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that grab bars, handholds, handrails or stanchions are located throughout vehicles to assist
people with disabilities.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers.

Applies to the following vehicles:

  • transit buses
  • motor coaches
  • streetcars
  • subways
  • light rail
  • commuter rail
  • inter-city rail

Applies to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

The general rule for the technical requirements is that they apply to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

However, the technical requirements also apply to vehicles manufactured before January 1, 2013. If a conventional
transportation service provider enters into a contract to purchase a vehicle on or after July 1, 2011, then that vehicle must also
meet the technical requirements of the regulation.

Conventional transportation service providers must make sure
that any vehicle manufactured on or after January 1, 2013 is equipped with grab bars, handholds, handrails or stanchions.

Conventional transportation service providers must make sure that where appropriate, based on the structure and type of vehicle,
grab bars, handholds, handrails or stanchions are provided at the following locations:

  • where passengers pay their fare
  • at each mobility aid securement location
  • at each courtesy seating area intended for the use of people with disabilities
  • at each side of any entrance or exit used by people with disabilities.

Grab bars, handholds, handrails, and stanchions that are located at an entrance or exit must be accessible from ground level and
mounted so that they are inside the vehicle when the doors are closed.

As well, grab bars, handholds, handrails or stanchions must meet the following standards:

  • They must be distributed throughout the vehicle, as appropriate to the vehicle’ design, so that they assist
    with independent and safe boarding, moving on the vehicle, sitting down, standing up, and deboarding for people with
    disabilities.
  • They must be positioned so they do not interfere with the turning and manoeuvring space needed to allow people with
    disabilities using mobility aids to reach the allocated space from the entrance.
  • They must be high colour-contrasted with their background to assist with visual recognition.
  • They must be sturdy, rounded and free of any sharp or abrasive element.
  • They must have an exterior diameter that permits easy grasping by a full range of passengers and that has sufficient clearance
    from the surface to which it is attached.
  • They must be designed to prevent catching or snagging of clothes or personal items.
  • They must have a slip resistant surface.

Where grab bars, handholds, handrails and stanchions return to a wall or floor, they must do so in a smooth curve. Brackets, clamps,
screw heads or other fasteners used on these supports must be rounded or flush with the surface and free from burrs or rough
edges.

Exemptions

Structural Integrity

Conventional transportation service providers who purchase a new or used vehicle (to which the general rule respecting the January
1, 2013 manufacture date does not apply) on or after July 1, 2011 do not have to meet the requirements pertaining to grab bars,
handholds, handrails and stanchions if their installation would impair the structural integrity of the vehicle.

Vehicles Regulated under Ontario Regulation 629

Vehicles regulated under Ontario Regulation 629 “Accessible Vehicles”, under the
Highway Traffic Act are not subject to this section. This is intended to eliminate duplication of requirements between the two
regulations, and to recognize the existing inspection and enforcement capabilities under the Highway Traffic Act.

Section 54: Floors and Carpeted Surfaces

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

54(1) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that all of its transportation vehicles manufactured on or
after January 1, 2013 to which this section applies,

(a) have floors that produce a minimal glare and are slip
resistant; and (b) any carpeted surfaces have a low, firm and level pile or loop and are securely fastened.

(2) This section applies in respect of the following:

  • Transit buses
  • Motor coaches
  • Streetcars
  • Subways
  • Light rail
  • Commuter rail
  • Inter-city rail

(3) Despite subsection (2), this section does not apply to vehicles regulated under Regulation 629 of the Revised Regulations
of Ontario, 1990 (Vehicles for the Transportation of Physically Disabled Passengers) made under the Highway Traffic Act.

(4) Despite subsection (1), where a conventional transportation service provider enters into a contractual obligation to purchase
new or used vehicles of a type referenced in subsection (2) on or after July 1, 2011, the transportation service provider shall
ensure the vehicles meet the requirements of this section.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that floors and floor surfaces on vehicles produce minimum glare, are slip resistant and are
securely fastened.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers.

Applies to the following vehicles:

  • transit buses
  • motor coaches
  • streetcars
  • subways
  • light rail
  • commuter rail
  • inter-city rail

Applies to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

The general rule for the technical requirements is that they apply to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

However, the technical requirements also apply to vehicles manufactured before January 1, 2013. If a conventional
transportation service provider enters into a contract to purchase a vehicle on or after July 1, 2011, then that vehicle must also meet the technical requirements of the regulation.

Conventional transportation service providers must meet the following requirements for the floors and carpets in their
transportation vehicles.

Floor surfaces

  • Floor surfaces must produce minimal glare, and they must be slip resistant.

Note – Slip-resistant surfaces offer a level of friction that allows people with disabilities, particularly those who use
mobility assistive devices, to travel safely in the vehicle.

Carpeted Surfaces

  • Carpeted surfaces must have low, firm and level pile or loop and be securely fastened to reduce the risk of a passenger
    tripping.

Note – The term “securely fastened” means the surface must be stable, firm, and
slip-resistant and not pose a tripping hazard. The term does not mean that the entire carpet or pad must be adhered to the floor
surface.

Exemption

Vehicles Regulated under Ontario Regulation 629

Vehicles regulated under Ontario Regulation 629 “Accessible Vehicles”, under the
Highway Traffic Act are not subject to this section. This is intended to eliminate duplication of requirements between the two
regulations, and to recognize the existing inspection and enforcement capabilities under the Highway Traffic Act.

Section 55: Allocated Mobility Aid Spaces

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

55(1) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that all of its transportation vehicles manufactured on or
after January 1, 2013 to which this section applies,

  • have two or more allocated mobility aid spaces, with each space being a minimum of,
    • style=”list-style-type: lower-roman”>1,220 millimetres by 685
      millimetres for vehicles designed to have a seating capacity of 24 passengers or less, and
    • 1,220 millimetres by 760 millimetres for vehicles designed to have a seating capacity of
      more than 24 passengers; and
  • are equipped, as appropriate, with securement devices.

(2) Spaces on transportation vehicles that are allocated as mobility aid spaces may be used for other passenger purposes, if
not required for use by a person with a disability who uses a mobility aid.

(3) This section applies in respect of the following:

  • Transit buses
  • Motor coaches
  • Streetcars
  • Subways
  • Light rail
  • Commuter rail
  • Inter-city rail

(4) Despite subsection (3), subsection (1) does not apply to vehicles that have two or more allocated mobility aid spaces and
that are regulated under Regulation 629 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1990 (Vehicles for the Transportation of Physically
Disabled Passengers) made under the Highway Traffic Act.

(5) Despite subsection (1), where a conventional transportation service provider enters into a contractual obligation to purchase
new or used vehicles of a type referenced in subsection (3) on or after July 1, 2011, the transportation service provider shall
ensure the vehicles meet the requirements of this section.

(6) Subsection (5) does not apply if the installation of mobility aid spaces would impair the structural integrity of the
vehicle.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that two or more defined mobility aid spaces are provided on conventional transportation
vehicles to accommodate people with disabilities using mobility aids.

This requirement also includes having devices available to secure mobility aids, as appropriate.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers.

Applies to the following vehicles:

  • transit buses
  • motor coaches
  • streetcars
  • subways
  • light rail
  • commuter rail
  • inter-city rail

Applies to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

The general rule for the technical requirements is that they apply to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

However, the technical requirements also apply to vehicles manufactured before January 1, 2013. If a conventional
transportation service provider enters into a contract to purchase a vehicle on or after July 1, 2011, then that vehicle must also
meet the technical requirements of the regulation.

The regulation requires conventional transportation vehicles to
have two or more spaces allocated for mobility aids.

Location

Generally, allocated spaces for mobility aids are located at the front of the vehicle, near the entrance. However, the spaces could
also be located in the middle of the vehicle. Often, their location will depend on the location of the lifting device or ramp on the
vehicle.

Allocated mobility aid spaces are not required to be side by side.

In some vehicles, the allocated mobility aid spaces are clearly recognizable because they are located where there are no seats for
other passengers. In other vehicles, the allocated mobility aid spaces may not be clearly recognizable because they are covered by
passenger seats that can be flipped up when required by a person with a disability using a mobility aid.

Dimensions

For vehicles with a seating capacity of 24 passengers or less, each allocated mobility aid space must be at a minimum 1220
millimetres by 685 millimetres.

For vehicles with a seating capacity of more than 24 passengers, each allocated mobility aid space must be at a minimum 1220
millimetres by 760 millimetres.

Mobility Aid Securement Devices

Vehicles must be equipped with devices to secure mobility aids in each of the allocated spaces, where they are appropriate.

A securement device is designed to prevent mobility aids from tipping over or from rolling or sliding out of the allocated
spaces.

Securement devices can include wheel clamps and floor or wall mounted straps that secure the mobility aids.

Use by Other Passengers

Other passengers may use the mobility aid securement locations, when they are not required by people with disabilities who use
mobility aids.

Exemptions

Structural Integrity

Conventional transportation service providers who purchase a new or used vehicle (to which the general rule respecting the January
1, 2013 manufacture date does not apply) on or after July 1, 2011 do not have to meet the requirements pertaining to allocated
mobility aid spaces if their installation would impair the structural integrity of the vehicle.

Vehicles Regulated under Ontario Regulation 629

Vehicles regulated under Ontario Regulation 629 “Accessible Vehicles”, under the
Highway Traffic Act, and that have two or more allocated mobility aid spaces, are not subject to this section.

This is intended to eliminate duplication of requirements between the two regulations, and to recognize the existing
inspection and enforcement capabilities under the Highway Traffic Act.

Section 56: Stop Requests and Emergency Response Controls

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

56(1) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that all of its transportation vehicles manufactured on or
after January 1, 2013 to which this section applies are equipped with accessible stop-requests and emergency response controls that
are located throughout the transportation vehicle, including places within reach of allocated mobility aid spaces and courtesy seating
locations.

(2) Accessible stop-requests and emergency response controls must meet the following standards:

  • They must provide auditory and visual indications that the request has been made.
  • They must be mounted no higher than 1,220 millimetres and no lower than 380 millimetres above the floor.
  • They must be operable with one hand and must not require tight grasping, pinching or twisting of the wrist.
  • They must be high colour-contrasted with the equipment to which the control is mounted.
  • They must provide tactile information on emergency response controls.

(3) With respect to stop-requests, this section applies to the following:

  • Transit buses
  • Motor coaches
  • Street cars

(4) With respect to emergency response controls, this section applies to the following:

  • Subways
  • Light rail
  • Commuter rail
  • Inter-city rail

(5) Despite subsection (1), where a conventional transportation service provider enters into a contractual obligation to purchase
new or used vehicles of the type referenced in subsection (3) or (4) on or after July 1, 2011, the transportation service provider
shall ensure the vehicles meet the requirements of this section.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that appropriate stop-request controls and emergency response controls are installed on all
conventional transportation service vehicles.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers.

Stop-Request requirements apply to the following vehicles:

  • transit buses
  • motor coaches
  • streetcars

Emergency Response requirements apply to the following vehicles:

  • subways
  • light rail
  • commuter rail
  • inter-city rail

Applies to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

The general rule for the technical requirements is that they apply to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

However, the technical requirements also apply to vehicles manufactured before January 1, 2013. If a conventional
transportation service provider enters into a contract to purchase a vehicle on or after July 1, 2011, then that vehicle must also
meet the technical requirements of the regulation.

Under the regulation, conventional transportation vehicles must be equipped with accessible stop-requests and emergency response
controls, as appropriate.

Location

Accessible controls must be located throughout the vehicle, including places within reach of allocated mobility aid spaces and
courtesy seating locations.

It is not necessary to have a control for each seating location and standing location. However, the controls must be within reach
of allocated mobility aid spaces and courtesy seating locations. This will allow people with disabilities, whose ability or range of
motion may be limited, to reach the stop request buttons and the emergency response controls more easily.

Both stop requests and emergency response controls are not required in all vehicles. For example, a subway does not require
stop request controls, as a subway must stop at all stops, whereas a streetcar does require a stop request control. Additionally, a
transit bus does not require emergency response controls, as operators are easily notified of emergencies on board.

Accessible Control Standards

Accessible stop-requests and emergency response controls must meet the following standards.

Auditory and Visual Indicators

They must provide both auditory and visual indications that the request has been made so that people with a range of disabilities
are aware of the request.

Location

They must be located no higher than 1220 millimetres and no lower than 380 millimetres above the floor to allow for access and
to allow people with disabilities to independently activate the controls.

Operation

They must be able to be operated with one hand, and not require tight grasping, pinching or twisting of the wrist, to assist people
with disabilities who have difficulty with arm or hand movements.

Colour Contrast

They must be high colour-contrasted with the equipment on which the controls are mounted so that they are easily identified from
the surrounding material, or the objects on which they are placed.

Tactile Information

Emergency response controls must include tactile information. Tactile refers to raised lettering or Braille, used to communicate
the purpose of the control to people with visual disabilities or low vision.

Section 57: Lighting Features

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

57(1) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that all of its transportation vehicles manufactured on or
after January 1, 2013 to which this section applies are equipped with lights above or beside each passenger access door that are
constantly lit when the door is open and that illuminate the lifting device, ramp, portable bridge plate or step nosings, as the
case may be.

(2) The light above or beside each passenger access door must,

(a) when the door is open, illuminate the ground surface for a distance of at least 0.9 metres perpendicular to the bottom step
tread or lift outer edge; and (b) be shielded to protect the eyes of entering and exiting passengers.

(3) This section applies in respect of the following:

  • Transit buses
  • Motor coaches
  • Streetcars
  • Subways
  • Light rail
  • Commuter rail
  • Inter-city rail

(4) Despite subsection (3), this section does not apply to vehicles regulated under Regulation 629 of the Revised Regulations
of Ontario, 1990 (Vehicles for the Transportation of Physically Disabled Passengers) made under the Highway Traffic Act.

(5) Despite subsection (1), where a conventional transportation service provider enters into a contractual obligation to purchase
new or used vehicles of the type referenced in subsection (3) on or after July 1, 2011, the transportation service provider shall
ensure the vehicles meet the requirements of this section.

(6) Subsection (5) does not apply if the installation of the lights would impair the structural integrity of the vehicle.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that passenger access doors on all conventional transportation vehicles are equipped with lights
and that illuminate in a way that allows passengers to board and deboard the vehicle safely.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers

Applies to the following vehicles:

  • transit buses
  • motor coaches
  • streetcars
  • subways
  • light rail
  • commuter rail
  • inter-city rail

Applies to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

The general rule for the technical requirements is that they apply to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

However, the technical requirements also apply to vehicles manufactured before January 1, 2013. If a conventional
transportation service provider enters into a contract to purchase a vehicle on or after July 1, 2011, then that vehicle must also
meet the technical requirements of the regulation.

Lighting Requirements

Conventional transportation service providers must make sure that all of their transportation vehicles are equipped with lights
above or beside each passenger door.

The lights must be lit constantly when the doors are open, and illuminate the lifting devices, ramps, portable bridge plates or
step nosings, as the case may be.

Some vehicles will have none of these assistive devices, and some vehicles may have more than one of them.

Ground Level Lighting

When a passenger access door is open, the lights located above or beside each door must illuminate the ground surface for a
distance of at least 0.9 metres perpendicular to the tread on the bottom step or the outer edge of the lift.

Ground surface could be the road, sidewalk, station platform, or whatever surface a passenger would deboard onto.

The ground level lighting will help passengers see the bottom step or the edge of the lift when they are boarding a vehicle, and
to see the ground in front of them when they are exiting a vehicle.

Protecting from Glare

The lights located above or beside each passenger access door must be shielded to protect the eyes of passengers as they enter
and exit the vehicle.

When lights are not shielded, passengers can be temporarily blinded as they board and deboard the vehicles, which could cause
disorientation, tripping, etc.

For example, a light located on or near the floor should not be angled upward in a way that it is a hazard to passengers. An
overhead light should not be angled so that it is at eye level when passengers are exiting the vehicle.

Exemptions

Structural Integrity

Conventional transportation service providers who purchase a new or used vehicle (to which the general rule respecting the January
1, 2013 manufacture date does not apply) on or after July 1, 2011 do not have to meet the requirements pertaining to lighting if
their installation would impair the structural integrity of the vehicle.

Regulated under Ontario Regulation 629

Vehicles regulated under Ontario Regulation 629 “Accessible Vehicles”, under the
Highway Traffic Act are not subject to this section.

This is intended to eliminate duplication of requirements between the two regulations, and to recognize the existing
inspection and enforcement capabilities under the Highway Traffic Act.

Section 58: Signage

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

58 (1) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that all of its transportation vehicles manufactured on or
after January 1, 2013 to which this section applies display the route or direction of the transportation vehicle or its destination
or next major stop.

(2) For the purposes of subsection (1), the signage displaying the route or direction or destination or next stop may include
pictograms or symbols, but the signage must,

  • be visible at the boarding point;
  • be consistently located;
  • have a glare-free surface; and
  • be positioned to avoid shadow areas and glare.

(3) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that the signage displaying the route or direction or
destination or next stop,

  • is consistently shaped, coloured and positioned, when used in the same type of
    transportation vehicle to give the same type of information; and
  • has text that, is high colour-contrasted with its background, in order to assist with visual recognition,
    and
  • has the appearance of solid characters.

(4) This section applies in respect of the following:

  • Transit buses
  • Motor coaches
  • Streetcars
  • Subways
  • Light rail
  • Commuter rail
  • Inter-city rail

(5) Despite subsection (1), where a conventional transportation service provider enters into a contractual obligation to purchase
new or used vehicles of the type referenced in subsection (4) on or after July 1, 2011, the transportation service provider shall
ensure the vehicles meet the requirements of this section.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that signage identifying the route, direction, destination, or next major stop is displayed on
all conventional transportation vehicles.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers

Applies to the following vehicles:

  • transit buses
  • motor coaches
  • streetcars
  • subways
  • light rail
  • commuter rail
  • inter-city rail

Applies to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

The general rule for the technical requirements is that they apply to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

However, the technical requirements also apply to vehicles manufactured before January 1, 2013. If a conventional
transportation service provider enters into a contract to purchase a vehicle on or after July 1, 2011, then that vehicle must also
meet the technical requirements of the regulation.

Signage Information

All conventional transportation service providers must make sure that all of their transportation vehicles display the route or
direction of the vehicle or its destination or next major stop.

Examples:

  • #36 North
  • Queen Street to King Street
  • Ottawa Express

Signage Requirements and Characteristics

Consistency in signage will help people with disabilities recognize the transportation vehicle they are looking for or
intending to board. This is especially important along routes served by more than one vehicle, which travel to different
destinations.

Signage must include all of the following components:

The signs must be visible at the boarding point.

  • The boarding point refers to the area on a vehicle where passengers board and deboard.
  • Signs at the boarding point alert people with disabilities of the route or direction of the vehicle.

The signs must be consistently located.

  • The signage may be to the right, left, or above the boarding point, as long as its location is consistent among those types of
    vehicles.
  • When signs are placed in the same place, people with disabilities know where to look for and to find the
    information.

For example, the local city bus service has electronic signs displaying bus destinations above the window adjacent to the
passenger access door on each vehicle.

The signs must have a glare-free surface.

  • A glare-free surface is a surface that does not easily reflect light from the sun or artificial lights which can make it difficult
    to see or read a sign.
  • A glare-free surface makes it easier to see and read what is written on it.
  • A glare free surface is based on the material used or how the surface is treated.

The signs must be positioned to avoid shadow areas and glare.

  • The exact position of a sign to avoid glare and shadows will vary depending on the type of vehicle.
  • Avoiding shadow areas and glare on the signs will help people with disabilities to properly identify the information on the sign,
    regardless of the time of day or weather conditions.

The signs must be easy to find and to read.

  • Signage must be consistently shaped, coloured and positioned, when used in the same type of transportation vehicle to give the
    same type of information.
  • For example, all commuter trains in a fleet have a horizontal sign above each entrance door that tells of the final destination
    of the train, and include a yellow text over a black background.
  • The text must be high colour-contrasted with its background, such as the wall or the frame on which the sign is mounted, or in
    the case of electronic signage, the background would be the screen colour as distinct from the text colour.
  • The text must be in solid characters. Solid characters means that the letters and numbers are filled in, as opposed to hollow,
    and do not have shadows.

Pictograms or symbols

Signage may include pictograms or symbols, in order to provide greater clarity to people with disabilities.

A pictogram refers to a pictorial resemblance to a physical object, for example, a picture of a ferry with an arrow, indicating
the entrance to the ferry.

Section 59: Lifting Devices, Ramps or Portable Bridge Plates

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

59(1) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that all of its transportation vehicles manufactured on or
after January 1, 2013 to which this section applies are equipped with lifting devices, ramps or portable bridge plates and that each
of them has,

  • a colour strip that runs its full width marking the bottom edge and that is high
    colour-contrasted with its background to assist with visual recognition;
  • a slip resistant platform surface; and
  • raised edges of sufficient height to prevent a mobility aid from rolling off the edge of the
    ramp during the boarding or deboarding of passengers.

(2) This section applies in respect of the following:

  • Transit buses
  • Motor coaches
  • Streetcars
  • Subways
  • Light rail
  • Commuter rail
  • Inter-city rail

(3) Despite subsection (2), this section does not apply to vehicles that are equipped with lifting devices, ramps or portable
bridge plates and that are regulated under Regulation 629 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1990 (Vehicles for the
Transportation of Physically Disabled Passengers) made under the Highway Traffic Act.

(4) Despite subsection (1), where a conventional transportation service provider enters into a contractual obligation to purchase
new or used vehicles of the type referenced in subsection (2) on or after July 1, 2011, the transportation service provider shall
ensure the vehicles meet the requirements of this section.

The Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all conventional transportation vehicles are equipped with lifting devices, ramps,
or portable bridge plates to help people with disabilities board and deboard the vehicles.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers

Applies to the following vehicles:

  • transit buses
  • motor coaches
  • streetcars
  • subways
  • light rail
  • commuter rail
  • inter-city rail

Applies to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

The general rule for the technical requirements is that they apply to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

However, the technical requirements also apply to vehicles manufactured before January 1, 2013. If a conventional
transportation service provider enters into a contract to purchase a vehicle on or after July 1, 2011, then that vehicle must also
meet the technical requirements of the regulation.

Conventional transportation service providers must make sure that all of their transportation vehicles are equipped with lifting
devices, ramps, or portable bridge plates.

Lifting devices, ramps, and portable bridge plates are pieces of equipment that help people with disabilities to safely board and
deboard vehicles.

Lifting Device, Ramp, Portable Bridge Plate Requirements

Each lifting device, ramp, or portable bridge plate must have the following:

A Colour Strip

  • The colour strip must run the full width of the bottom edge of the lifting device, ramp, or portable bridge plate.
  • The strip must be high colour-contrasted with its background. A high colour-contrasted strip will assist people with disabilities
    in distinguishing where the edge of the lifting device, ramp, or portable bridge plate meets the ground, or the transition from a
    sloped surface to a flat surface.

A Slip-resistant Platform Surface

  • A slip-resistant surface is one that even when wet provides friction between the surface and a person’s
    footwear, mobility aid or mobility assistive device. This reduces the risk of slipping.

Raised Edges

  • The raised edges must be high enough to prevent or hinder a mobility aid from rolling off the edge while boarding or deboarding
    the vehicles.

Exemption

Vehicles Regulated under Ontario Regulation 629

Vehicles regulated under Ontario Regulation 629 “Accessible Vehicles”, under the
Highway Traffic Act, and that have lifting devices, ramps, or portable bridge plates, are not subject to this section.

This is intended to eliminate duplication of requirements between the two regulations, and to recognize the existing
inspection and enforcement capabilities under the Highway Traffic Act.

Section 60: Steps

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

60(1) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that where transportation vehicles are equipped with steps,
the steps meet the following requirements:

  • The top outer edge of each step is marked by a colour strip that is high colour-contrasted with its background, to assist with
    visual recognition, that runs the full width of the leading edge of the step, excluding any side edge mouldings, and can be viewed from
    both directions of travel.
  • The steps have surfaces that are slip resistant and that produce minimal glare.
  • The steps have uniform, closed riser heights and tread depths, subject to the structural limitations of the vehicle.

(2) This section applies in respect of the following:

  • Transit buses
  • Motor coaches
  • Streetcars
  • Subways
  • Light rail
  • Commuter rail
  • Inter-city rail

(3) Despite subsection (2), this section does not apply to vehicles regulated under Regulation 629 of the Revised Regulations
of Ontario, 1990 (Vehicles for the Transportation of Physically Disabled Passengers) made under the Highway Traffic Act.

(4) Conventional transportation service providers shall comply with the requirements of this section in respect of its vehicles to
which this section applies that are manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

(5) Despite subsection (4), where a conventional transportation service provider enters into a contractual obligation to purchase
new or used vehicles of the type referenced in subsection (2) on or after July 1, 2011, the transportation service provider shall
ensure the vehicles meet the requirements of this section.

The Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is to make sure that the steps on all conventional transportation vehicles include consistent
accessibility and safety features.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers

Applies to the following vehicles:

  • transit buses
  • motor coaches
  • streetcars
  • subways
  • light rail
  • commuter rail
  • inter-city rail

Applies to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

The general rule for the technical requirements is that they apply to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

However, the technical requirements also apply to vehicles manufactured before January 1, 2013. If a conventional
transportation service provider enters into a contract to purchase a vehicle on or after July 1, 2011, then that vehicle must also
meet the technical requirements of the regulation.

Conventional transportation service providers must make sure that all transportation vehicles that have steps meet the following
requirements for them.

Edging

The top outer edge of each step must be marked by a colour strip. The colour of this strip must be high colour-contrasted with
the colour of the background to help people with disabilities distinguish the edge of the step.

The colour strips must run the full width of the leading edge of the steps, excluding any side edge mouldings. Generally, side edge
mouldings are small and raised above the level of the step itself, often for safety reasons, and cannot be effectively marked with a
colour strip.

The colour strips must be visible from both directions of travel when passengers are walking up the steps to board the vehicles and
walking down the steps to deboard.

On some vehicles, for example motor coaches, the centre aisle may slope slightly upward from the front entrance toward the back
of the vehicle. This requires a step (of varying heights) to access
some front row seats. These steps are not considered in the path of travel and are therefore not required to meet the colour strip
requirement.

Surfaces

The steps must have slip-resistant surfaces and produce minimal glare.

A slip-resistant surface is one that, even when wet, provides enough friction between the surface and a
persons’ footwear, mobility aid, or mobility assistive device to reduce the risk of slipping.

A minimal glare surface is one that, under normal circumstances, reduces the glare from the sun or from artificial lights. This
makes it easier for passengers with disabilities to see the steps when boarding or deboarding the vehicles.

Heights and Depths

The steps must have the same closed riser heights and same tread depths, subject to the structural limitations of the vehicle.

Consistent height and depth of steps will assist people with disabilities when using the steps.

The risers of the steps must be closed. This refers to the back vertical portion of the steps. Open riser heights can be a tripping
hazard for a foot or mobility assistive device.

Exemption

Vehicles Regulated under Ontario Regulation 629

Vehicles regulated under Ontario Regulation 629 “Accessible Vehicles”, under the
Highway Traffic Act are not subject to this section.

This is intended to eliminate duplication of requirements between the two regulations, and to recognize the existing
inspection and enforcement capabilities under the Highway Traffic Act.

Section 61: Indicators and Alarms

Requirements as Stated in the Regulation

61(1) Every conventional transportation service provider shall ensure that where its transportation vehicles have a ramp, lifting
device or a kneeling function, each of them is equipped with a visual warning lamp indicator mounted on the exterior near the
mobility aid accessible door and with an audible warning alarm.

(2) The visual warning lamp indicator and the audible warning alarm must function when the kneeling function, ramp or lifting
device is in motion.

(3) If a ramp or lifting device is being manually operated, no warning lamp indicator or warning alarm is required.

(4) This section applies in respect of the following:

  • Transit buses
  • Motor coaches
  • Streetcars
  • Subways
  • Light rail
  • Commuter rail
  • Inter-city rail

(5) Despite subsection (4), this section does not apply to vehicles regulated under Regulation 629 of the Revised Regulations
of Ontario, 1990 (Vehicles for the Transportation of Physically Disabled Passengers) made under the Highway Traffic Act.

(6) Conventional transportation service providers shall comply with the requirements of this section in respect of its vehicles to
which the section applies that are manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

(7) Despite subsection (6), where a conventional transportation service provider enters into a contractual obligation to purchase
new or used vehicles of the type referenced in subsection (4) on or after July 1, 2011, the transportation service provider shall
ensure the vehicles meet the requirements of this section.

(8) Subsection (7) does not apply if the installation of the warning lamp indicator or warning alarm would impair the structural
integrity of the vehicle.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is to make sure appropriate visual and audible warning indicators and alarms are installed on
conventional transportation vehicles to indicate movement of a ramp or lifting device or that the
“kneeling” function is
operating.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers

Applies to the following vehicles:

  • transit buses
  • motor coaches
  • streetcars
  • subways
  • light rail
  • commuter rail
  • inter-city rail

Applies to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

The general rule for the technical requirements is that they apply to vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

However, the technical requirements may apply to vehicles manufactured before January 1, 2013. If a conventional
transportation service provider enters into a contract to purchase a vehicle on or after July 1, 2011, then that vehicle must also
meet the technical requirements of the regulation.

Warning Indicators and Alarms

Conventional transportation service providers must make sure that the vehicles with ramps or lifting devices or which
“kneel” are equipped with warning lamps and alarms.

The lamps and alarms will provide visual and audible alerts when the ramps or lifting devices are being used or when the bus is
kneeling down to let passengers on or off. The warning alarms and lamps indicate that movement is, or will be, happening outside of
the vehicle and warn of a potential hazard.

This is intended to assist with the safety of both people with and without disabilities who may be outside the vehicle.

Warning Lamps

Warning lamp indicators are usually amber in colour and flash on and off to warn those in the vicinity that a ramp or lifting device
is moving or that the vehicle is kneeling. However, there is no specific colour or flashing requirement.

The warning lamps required by this regulation serve a different function than other standard lights, such as hazard lights, that
may be required on other vehicles.

The visual warning lamp indicator must be mounted on the exterior of the vehicle, near the mobility aid accessible door.

Warning Alarms

There is no specific tone or sound required for warning alarms.

Using the Lights and Alarms

The visual warning lamp indicator and the audible warning alarm must function when the ramp or lifting device is moving or when the
bus is kneeling down or rising.

The visual and audible alarms are only required when the ramp, lifting device and kneeling function are being used. The visual and
audible alarms are not required during regular door opening and closing where these devices are not in use.

On some vehicles, such as subways, visual warning lamp indicators and audible warning alarms are used when the doors open
and close. These continue to be permitted.

A warning lamp indicator or warning alarm is not required when a ramp or lifting device is being manually operated. This could be
because it is not electronic, or because it is not working properly. In these cases, the person operating the ramp or device
can tell people who are in the vicinity about the potential hazard.

Exemptions

Structural Integrity

Conventional transportation service providers who purchase a new or used vehicle (to which the general rule respecting the January
1, 2013 manufacture date does not apply) on or after July 1, 2011 do not have to meet the requirements pertaining to indicators and
alarms if their installation would impair the structural integrity of the vehicle.

Vehicles Regulated under Ontario Regulation 629

Vehicles regulated under Ontario Regulation 629 “Accessible Vehicles”, under the
Highway Traffic Act are not subject to this section.

This is intended to eliminate duplication of requirements between the two regulations, and to recognize the existing
inspection and enforcement capabilities under the Highway Traffic Act.

Section 62: Rail Cars

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

62(1) Every conventional transportation service provider whose transportation services include light rail, commuter rail or
inter-city rail shall ensure that at least one rail car per train is accessible to persons with disabilities who use mobility
aids.

(2) Every conventional transportation service provider whose transportation services include light rail, commuter rail or
inter-city rail shall ensure that where washrooms are provided on the rail cars there is at least one mobility aid accessible washroom on the mobility aid accessible rail car.

(3) Conventional transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of subsection (1) by July 1, 2011.

(4) Conventional transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of subsection (2) by January 1, 2013 with respect to
trains that are using rail cars manufactured on or after January 1,
2013.

(5) Despite subsection (4), where a conventional transportation service provider enters into a contractual obligation to purchase
new or used rail cars on or after July 1, 2011, it shall ensure that trains that are using such rail cars meet the requirements of
subsection (2).

(6) Subsection (5) does not apply if the installation of the mobility aid accessible washroom would impair the structural
integrity of the mobility aid accessible rail car.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is light rail, commuter rail or inter-city rail trains have a car that is accessible to people with
disabilities who use mobility aids.

In addition, on those light rail, commuter rail or inter-city rail trains that have washrooms, there will be a washroom that is
accessible to people with disabilities who use mobility aids.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Conventional transportation service providers

Applies to the following vehicles:

  • light rail
  • commuter rail
  • inter-city rail

One mobility aid accessible rail car requirement – July 1, 2011.

Accessible washroom requirement applies to rail cars manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

The general rule for the technical requirements is that they apply to rail cars manufactured on or after January 1, 2013.

However, the technical requirements also apply to rail cars manufactured before January 1, 2013. If a conventional
transportation service provider enters into a contract to purchase a rail car on or after July 1, 2011, the rail car must also meet the accessible washroom requirements set out for light rail, commuter rail or inter-city rail cars.

Mobility Aid Accessible Rail Car

Conventional transportation service providers that operate light rail, commuter rail or inter-city rail must make sure that at least
one rail car per train is accessible to people with disabilities who use mobility aids.

The allocated mobility aid spaces must meet the requirements in section 55, and must be located on the rail car that is accessible
to mobility aids. For more information on spaces for mobility aids, please go to Transportation, Section 55,
Allocated Mobility Aid Spaces” .

Accessible Washroom

Conventional transportation service providers that operate light rail, commuter rail or inter-city rail must make sure that where
washrooms are provided on the rail cars there is at least one washroom that is accessible to people with disabilities who use
mobility aids.

The mobility aid accessible washroom must be located on the rail car that is accessible to mobility aids.

Conventional transportation service providers are not required to install mobility aid accessible washrooms on trains that do not
have washrooms.

Exemption

Structural Integrity

Conventional transportation service providers who purchase new or used light rail, commuter rail or inter-city rail cars (to which
the general rule respecting the January 1, 2013 manufacture date does not apply) on or after July 1, 2011 do not have to meet the
requirements pertaining to accessible washrooms if the installation of the accessible washroom would impair the structural integrity of
the mobility aid accessible rail car.

Section 63: Categories of Eligibility

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

63(1) Every specialized transportation service provider shall have three categories of eligibility to qualify for specialized
transportation services,

  • unconditional eligibility;
  • temporary eligibility; and
  • conditional eligibility.

(2) For purposes of eligibility for specialized transportation services, specialized transportation service providers shall
categorize persons with disabilities as follows:

  • A person with a disability that prevents them from using conventional transportation services shall be categorized as having
    unconditional eligibility.
  • A person with a temporary disability that prevents them from using conventional transportation services shall be categorized as
    having temporary eligibility.
  • A person with a disability where environmental or physical barriers limit their ability to consistently use conventional
    transportation services shall be categorized as having conditional eligibility.

(3) A specialized transportation service provider may deny requests for specialized transportation services to persons who are
categorized as having temporary eligibility or conditional eligibility if the conventional transportation service is
accessible to the person and the person has the ability to use it.

(4) Specialized transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2017.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that specialized transportation service providers will establish three categories
for eligibility and use them consistently when people with disabilities apply to use the services.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to specialized transportation service providers. They must comply by January 1, 2017.

Implementing the Requirement

Categories of Eligibility

Every specialized transportation service provider must develop and use three categories of eligibility: unconditional eligibility,
temporary eligibility and conditional eligibility.

Unconditional Eligibility

People with disabilities that prevent them from using conventional transportation services shall be categorized as having
unconditional eligibility.

Example: As a result of a developmental disability, Stephen cannot safely board, travel on, and deboard conventional
transportation services. Other methods of accommodating him, such as travel training, have been unsuccessful.

Temporary Eligibility

People with disabilities that are temporary but prevent them from using conventional transportation services shall be
categorized as having temporary eligibility.

Example: Mary was in a car accident and because of her injuries cannot access conventional transportation services for three
weeks.

Conditional Eligibility

People with disabilities who are unable to consistently use conventional transportation services because of physical or
environmental barriers, such as the winter weather, shall be categorized as having conditional eligibility.

Example: During the spring, summer and autumn, Henry is able to get to the bus stop to wait for #406 transit bus, which takes him
to work. In the winter, however, he cannot manoeuvre his wheelchair through the snow and ice to the bus stop.

When applying the criteria for the three categories of eligibility, specialized transportation service providers should
not base their decisions solely on the type of disability. They should also consider the person’s ability to use
the local conventional transportation services and in what circumstances the person is able to use those services.

Offering Consistency

The three categories of eligibility for specialized transportation will be consistent across the province.

Every provider of specialized transportation services will use these three categories; however, the providers will apply the
criteria for the three categories based on the facts of each situation.

Denying Requests

Specialized transportation service providers may deny requests for specialized transportation to people who have been categorized as having temporary or conditional eligibility, if the local conventional transportation service is accessible, and the person
can use it.

This provision recognizes that some people with disabilities are able to access and use conventional transportation services.

Example: Mary was categorized as having a “temporary disability” as a result
of her short-term disability. She lived across the street from a bus stop and the buses serving that route were accessible. However,
the stop where Mary had to get off the bus for her job was not accessible. Consequently, for her journey to and from work, Mary
was provided with specialized transportation.

On the weekends, Mary shopped at the local mall. She used the
subway system, which she was able to access from the street and was connected to the mall. In this case, Mary did not encounter any
barriers to the conventional transportation service. Consequently,
the specialised transportation service provider denied service to Mary for that purpose.

Section 64: Eligibility Application Process

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

64(1) If a person has completed an application for eligibility for specialized transportation services and the
person’s eligibility has not been determined within 14 calendar days after the completed application is received
by the specialized transportation service provider, the person shall be considered to have temporary eligibility for specialized
transportation services until a decision on his or her eligibility is made.

(2) A specialized transportation service provider shall not charge a fee to persons with disabilities who apply or who are
considered eligible for specialized transportation services.

(3) A specialized transportation service provider may require a reassessment of the eligibility of temporarily eligible registrants
at reasonable intervals.

(4) A specialized transportation service provider shall, upon the request of the person requesting specialized transportation
services, make available to the requester all of his or her specialized transportation services eligibility application and
decision information in accessible formats.

(5) A specialized transportation service provider shall establish an independent appeal process to review decisions
respecting eligibility.

(6) A specialized transportation service provider shall make a decision on an appeal with respect to eligibility within 30
calendar days after receiving the complete appeal application, but if a final decision is not made within the 30 days, the applicant
shall be granted temporary eligibility until a final decision is made.

(7) Specialized transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2014.

(8) A specialized transportation service provider shall have policies respecting the collection, use and disclosure of personal
information collected for purposes of determining eligibility under this section.

(9) In this section, “personal information” means personal information within the
meaning of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that specialized transportation service providers will meet standard service
requirements for people with disabilities during the application and appeals process for specialized transportation services.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to specialized transportation service providers. They must comply by January 1, 2014.

Implementing the Requirement

Specialized transportation service providers may not charge an application or assessment fee to people with disabilities who apply
to use specialized transportation services.

This is separate from the fares the providers charge for use of their specialized transportation services.

Application Waiting Period

Once specialized transportation service providers have received a completed application for eligibility, they have 14 calendar days
to make a decision. If they have not made a decision on an application by the end of the 14 days, they must give the applicant
temporary eligibility until a decision on the eligibility is made.

This is intended to help people with disabilities who need specialized transportation services in two ways:

  • First, it tells applicants how long they will wait before they will hear about their applications for specialized transportation
    services. The provision lets them know that their applications will not be held up for weeks because of backlogs or administrative
    issues.
  • Second, the provision encourages specialized transportation service providers to process the applications quickly and to reduce
    the waiting times for people with disabilities who have applied for the services.

Providing Accessible Formats

When requested, specialized transportation service providers will give the person who is requesting specialized transportation
services all of the information relating to his or her eligibility application, including the decisions, in accessible formats.

For more information on accessible formats, please go to the Glossary, which gives a general description. For more detailed
information, go to Information and Communications Standard, Section 12, “Accessible Formats and Communication
Supports
” .

Re-assessing Eligibility

Specialized transportation service providers may re-assess, at reasonable intervals, the eligibility of people with disabilities
who have been given temporary eligibility.

This recognizes that people with disabilities who have been given temporary eligibility to use the specialized transportation
services may no longer need it at some point.

Example: A person who breaks both legs in an accident may require specialized transportation services for several months.
Once his legs have healed, however, he may begin to use conventional transportation services once again.

Appealing the Process

Specialized transportation service providers are required to establish an independent appeal process to review their decisions
on eligibility.

It is at the discretion of the specialized transportation service provider how the individuals or boards responsible for
reviewing appeals will be selected or appointed.

Deciding within 30 days

Specialized transportation service providers are required to make decisions on appeals with respect to eligibility within 30
calendar days after receiving the completed appeal applications.

If final decisions are not made within the 30 calendar days, the specialized transportation service providers will grant applicants
temporary eligibility. The applicants have temporary eligibility until final decisions are made.

If appeal decisions are in favour of the people with disabilities, then they will receive specialized transportation
services according to the providers’ standard practices and procedures.

Upholding the original decision

If appeal decisions uphold the original decisions of ineligibility for specialized transportation services, then the
people with disabilities appealing the decision will not be eligible to receive specialized services.

If these people with disabilities were granted temporary eligibility because no decisions on their appeals were made within
30 calendar days, then they would no longer be eligible for specialized transportation services.

Collecting Personal Information

Specialized transportation service providers must have policies on the collection, use and disclosure of personal information
gathered for purposes of determining eligibility for specialized transportation services.

“Personal information” refers to personal information within the meaning of the Freedom of
Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

Section 65: Emergency or Compassionate Grounds

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

65(1) Specialized transportation service providers shall develop procedures respecting the provision of temporary specialized
transportation services earlier than in the 14 calendar days referred to in subsection 64 (1),

  • where the services are required because of an emergency or on compassionate grounds;
    and
  • where there are no other accessible transportation services to meet the
    person’s needs.

(2) A person shall apply for the services described in subsection (1) in the manner determined by the specialized
transportation service provider.

(3) Specialized transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2014.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of the requirement is that specialized transportation service providers will develop procedures to respond to people with
disabilities who need specialized services – because of an emergency or on compassionate grounds
– earlier than the standard application timeline of 14 calendar days.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to specialized transportation service providers. They must comply by January 1, 2014.

Implementing the Requirement

Under normal circumstances, when people with disabilities apply for eligibility for specialized transportation services, the
specialized transportation service providers have 14 calendar days after receiving the completed application forms to make their
decisions.

Under this requirement, the specialized transportation service providers must develop procedures for granting temporary
eligibility earlier than the 14 calendar days when the applicant needs specialized transportation services because of an emergency
or on compassionate grounds.

These procedures would come into effect when there are no other accessible transportation services available to meet the
individual’s needs.

For more information on the eligibility application process,
please go to Transportation, Section 64, “Eligibility Application Process“.

Example: The husband of a woman with a disability is her primary caregiver and driver. When he has a heart attack, his wife is
unable to visit him because she cannot drive herself, and there are no other accessible transportation services (such as an accessible
taxicab) in the area that she can access in order to get to the hospital.

In this situation, it would be appropriate to allow her temporary use of the specialized transportation services earlier
than the standard 14-day waiting period.

Note: The need for specialized transportation services because of an emergency or on compassionate grounds is separate from a
medical emergency or the need for an ambulance to bring a person to a hospital for medical attention. People who require urgent medical
attention should call 9-1-1 or contact their local emergency service.

Applying for Emergency or Compassion Grounds

People with disabilities who need specialized transportation services because of an emergency or on compassionate grounds must
apply in a manner determined by the specialized transportation service provider. This could include, for example, an abbreviated
application form.

Specialized transportation service providers have the discretion to determine what criteria are developed to provide the service for
emergencies or on compassionate grounds.

The providers will also decide what parameters to put in place when temporary specialized transportation services are granted for
emergencies or on compassionate grounds. These parameters could include the number of days that service may be provided.

Collecting Personal Information

Specialized transportation service providers should consider the confidentiality of personal information and develop policies
respecting the collection, use and disclosure of personal information collected for purposes of determining eligibility for
specialized transportation services based on emergency or compassionate grounds.

Section 66: Fare Parity

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

66(1) Where conventional transportation services and specialized transportation services are provided by separate transportation
service providers in the same jurisdiction, the specialized transportation service provider shall not charge more than the
highest fare charged for conventional transportation services in the same jurisdiction.

(2) Specialized transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of subsection (1) by January 1, 2017.

(3) Where a transportation service provider provides both conventional transportation services and specialized transportation
services, the transportation service provider shall ensure that there is fare parity between conventional transportation services
and specialized transportation services.

(4) Transportation service providers to which subsection (3) applies shall meet the requirements of that subsection by January
1, 2013.

(5) Where a transportation service provider provides both conventional transportation services and specialized transportation
services, the transportation service provider shall ensure that the same fare structure is applied to conventional transportation
services and specialized transportation services.

(6) Where a transportation service provider provides both conventional transportation services and specialized transportation
services, the transportation service provider shall ensure that the same fare payment options are available for all transportation
services, but alternative options shall be made available to persons with disabilities who cannot because of their disability
use a fare payment option.

(7) Conventional transportation service providers and specialized transportation service providers shall meet the
requirements of subsections (5) and (6) by January 1, 2013.

(8) In this section, “fare structure” means the fare price determined by fare
media, such as cash, tickets, passes and bulk quantity discounts and by fare category, such as adults, seniors and students, but
does not include promotional fares that a transportation service provider may employ from time to time.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that specialized transportation service providers charge people with disabilities
fares that are consistent with those charged on conventional transportation services.

The requirement also makes sure that people with disabilities who use specialized transportation services have the same fare
structures and fare payment options as those offered on conventional transportation services.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Organizations that provide both conventional and specialized transportation services, January 1, 2013

Must comply with fare parity requirement

Organizations that provide both conventional and specialized
transportation services, January 1, 2013

Must comply with fare structure and fare payment options
requirement

Organizations that provide specialized transportation services only (i.e., do not provide conventional transportation
services), By January 1, 2017

Must comply with fare parity requirement

Implementing the Requirement

Providing Fare Parity

Same provider

Transportation service providers that operate both conventional transportation services and specialized transportation services
must make sure that there is fare parity between the two services.

Different providers

Specialized transportation service providers that do not provide conventional transportation may not charge people with disabilities
more than the highest fare charged by the conventional transportation services in the same area.

This is intended to make sure that the fares paid by people with disabilities to use specialized transportation are similar to what
they would pay if they could travel on the conventional transportation services.

Structuring Fares

Providers that operate both conventional transportation services and specialized transportation services in the same area must make
sure that the same fare structure is applied to both services.

Fare structure refers to the fare price, which is determined by fare media and fare category.

  • Fare media can include cash, tickets, passes and bulk quantity discounts.
  • Fare category can include adults, seniors and students.

From time to time, some transportation service providers may offer promotional packages and fares. In these circumstances, these
promotional packages and fares are not considered fare structures.

This provision recognizes unique circumstances, such as conventional transportation service providers offering free travel
on a new conventional route for promotional reasons, or conventional transportation service providers offering reduced
fares for people with disabilities who can use the conventional services.

Paying Fares

Providers that operate both conventional transportation services and specialized transportation services in the same area must make
sure that the same fare payment options are available for all passengers.

For example, if tokens are accepted on the conventional transportation service, then tokens must be accepted on the
specialized transportation service.

However, alternative options must also be made available to people with disabilities, who because of their disabilities cannot
use commonly used fare payment option.

For example, some people with disabilities may have difficulty depositing coins or tickets into fare boxes. Other people with
disabilities may experience problems with the complexity or inaccessibility of the machines for paying fares. Transportation
service providers must address these barriers by providing alternative fare payment options.

Section 67: Visitors

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

67(1) Every specialized transportation service provider shall,

  • make specialized transportation services available to visitors; and
  • consider as eligible,
    • visitors who provide confirmation that they are eligible for specialized transportation services in the jurisdiction in which they reside, or
    • visitors who meet the specialized transportation services eligibility requirements of the
      specialized transportation service provider.

(2) Every specialized transportation service provider shall develop criteria to determine who falls into the category of
visitor for the purposes of this section.

(3) Specialized transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2013.

(4) A specialized transportation service provider shall have policies respecting the collection, use and disclosure of personal
information collected for purposes of determining eligibility under this section.

(5) In this section, “personal information” means personal information within the
meaning of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that specialized transportation service providers make their services available to
visitors with disabilities.

When do Organizations have to Comply

This requirement applies to specialized transportation service providers. They must comply by January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

Eligibility for Service

Specialized transportation service providers must make their transportation services available to visitors with
disabilities.

Specialized transportation service providers must allow visitors with disabilities to use the services if they meet one of two
conditions:

  • The visitors are able to confirm that they are eligible for specialized transportation services in their home
    jurisdiction.
  • The visitors meet the eligibility requirements for specialized transportation services of the provider of specialized
    transportation service in the area they are visiting.

Developing Criteria for Visitors

It is at the discretion of each specialized transportation service provider to develop a definition of the term visitor, and
to develop criteria to determine who falls into the category.

In addition, it is at the discretion of each specialized transportation service provider to decide whether or not there are
time limits for visitors to remain eligible to use the services.

Collecting Personal Information

Specialized transportation service providers must have policies on the collection, use and disclosure of personal information
gathered for purposes of determining eligibility for specialized transportation services.

“Personal information” refers to personal information within the meaning of the Freedom of
Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

Section 68: Origin to Destination Services

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

68(1) Every specialized transportation service provider shall provide origin to destination services within its service area that
takes into account the abilities of its passengers and that accommodates their abilities.

(2) Origin to destination services may include services on any accessible conventional transportation services.

(3) For the purposes of this section, origin to destination services refers to the overall package of transportation services
that allows a specialized transportation service provider to provide, in a flexible way, transportation services in a manner
that best meets the needs of persons with disabilities.

(4) Specialized transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of this section by July 1, 2011.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that specialized transportation service providers provide origin to destination
transportation services to eligible people with disabilities.

Providers may deliver this service by using specialized transportation services only, or a combination of specialized and
conventional transportation services.

When do Organizations have to Comply

The requirement applies to specialized transportation service providers. They must comply by July 1, 2011.

Implementing the Requirement

Every specialized transportation service provider must provide origin to destination services within its service area.

Origin to Destination

Origin to destination services refers to a package of transportation services that allows people with disabilities to
travel from their points of origin to their destination points.

Origin to destination services must take into account the abilities of the people with disabilities. This requirement
recognizes that some people with disabilities are able to use accessible conventional transportation services, but may also
require specialized transportation services for portions of their trips.

In some cases, origin to destination services could include door-to-door or curb-to-curb service, if applicable and required by
the person with a disability. In other cases, origin to destination services could include both specialized transportation services and
accessible conventional transportation service routes – the specialized service acts as a
“feeder” service to the accessible conventional services.

Example of “feeder” service

A person with a disability requires specialized transportation services for only a portion of his commute to work each day. The
other portion of the commute is accessible on conventional transportation for him because the subway station at the end of the
trip has an elevator.

Using what is available and accessible

This requirement recognizes that there are often various types of vehicles and services available in a jurisdiction, including
accessible conventional transportation services.

This requirement gives specialized transportation service providers the flexibility to use accessible conventional
transportation services for portions of trips, recognizing the abilities of the people with disabilities.

This allows specialized transportation service providers to deliver service to people with disabilities, while enabling those
people with disabilities who are able to use accessible conventional transportation services to do so when and where this
is possible.

Section 69: Coordinated Service

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

69 (1) Where specialized transportation services are provided in adjacent municipalities within contiguous urban areas, the
specialized transportation service providers shall facilitate connections between their respective services.

(2) Specialized transportation service providers to which subsection (1) applies shall determine the accessible stops and
drop off locations in the contiguous urban areas that have specialized transportation services.

(3) Specialized transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2013.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that specialized transportation service providers will make it easier for people
with disabilities to make connections between their services and the specialized transportation services that are provided in
adjacent municipalities.

When do Organizations have to Comply

The requirement applies to specialized transportation service providers. They must comply by January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

Specialized transportation service providers in adjacent municipalities in contiguous urban areas, such as the Greater
Toronto Area, must facilitate connections between their services to help people with disabilities make connections.

Adjacent municipalities within a contiguous urban area are two municipalities whose borders are noticeable only by the signs
announcing that individuals have left one municipality and entered another. The roads, houses, stores, and office buildings continue
in an unbroken strip from one municipality to the next.

By requiring specialized transportation service providers to coordinate their schedules, people with disabilities will be able
to travel to adjacent municipalities to work, attend school, or visit friends or family in a more coordinated manner and without
worrying about being stranded.

Coordinated Stops and Drop Off Locations

Specialized transportation service providers shall determine the accessible stops and drop off locations in the adjacent urban areas
that have specialized transportation services.

This is intended to reduce confusion and support a seamless transition from one specialized transportation service provider to
another.

Section 70: Hours of Service

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

70 (1) Where conventional transportation services and specialized transportation services are provided by separate
transportation service providers in the same jurisdiction, the specialized transportation service provider shall ensure that it
has, at a minimum, the same hours and days of service as any one of the conventional transportation service providers.

(2) Where a transportation service provider provides both conventional transportation services and specialized transportation
services, it shall ensure that the specialized transportation services have, at a minimum, the same hours and days of service as
the conventional transportation services.

(3) Specialized transportation service providers to which subsection (1) applies shall meet the requirements of subsection
(1) by January 1, 2017 and transportation service providers to which subsection (2) applies shall meet the requirements of
subsection (2) by January 1, 2013.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that specialized transportation service providers provide, at a minimum, service
during the same hours and on the same days as the conventional transportation services.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Organizations that provide specialized transportation services only (i.e. do not provide conventional transportation services), by January 1, 2017

Organizations that provide both conventional and specialized transportation services, By January 1, 2013

Implementing the Requirement

Separate Transportation Service Providers

Specialized transportation service providers that do not provide conventional transportation services in the same area must offer,
at a minimum, service for the same hours and on the same days as any one of the conventional transportation services in the
area.

This requirement recognizes that people with disabilities have commitments and responsibilities that require travel and need to be
able to travel at the same times as people who use conventional transportation services.

One Specialized Transportation Provider for Several Municipalities

In some parts of the province, there may be one specialized transportation service provider that provides service for several
municipalities. Each of the municipalities, however, may have their own conventional transportation service provider. In such cases,
the specialized transportation service must operate during the same hours and on the same days as any one of the conventional
transportation service providers.

For example, “A” is a specialized transportation service provider that provides service in three
separate municipalities, “X”, “Y”, and
“Z”. Each of these municipalities has its own conventional transportation service provider.

Under this requirement, specialized transportation service provider “A” must provide the same
hours and days of service as any one of conventional transportation service providers “X”,
“Y”, or “Z”.

Same Transportation Service Provider

When a transportation service provider provides both conventional and specialized transportation services, it shall make
sure that the specialized transportation service operates, at a minimum, for the same hours and on the same days as the
conventional transportation service.

Section 71: Bookings

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

71 (1) Every specialized transportation service provider shall, where the specialized transportation services require
reservations,

  • provide same day service to the extent that it is available; and
  • where same day service is not available, accept booking requests up to three hours before the
    published end of the service period on the day before the intended day of travel.

(2) A specialized transportation service provider to whom subsection (1) applies shall provide accessible means to accept
reservations.

(3) Specialized transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2014.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that specialized transportation service providers will provide same day service, to
the extent that it is available, and accept bookings for service as close as possible to the date requested.

When do Organizations have to Comply

The requirement applies to specialized transportation service providers. They must comply by January 1, 2014.

Implementing the Requirement

Same Day Service

Specialized transportation service providers that require eligible people with disabilities to make reservations are required
to provide same day service to the extent that it is available.

Example: A person with a disability calls his local specialized transportation service provider at 11:30 a.m. to book
transportation for a 3:00 p.m. appointment that day. The provider must provide specialized transportation, if available.

Next Day Services and Advance Bookings

When same day service is not available, specialized transportation service providers are required to accept booking
requests up to three hours before the published end of their service period on the day before the intended day of travel.

Note: In this case, the term “service period” refers to the hours of the day during which
transportation services are offered. The term does not refer to the general office hours – e.g., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
– of the providers of specialized transportation services.

Example: Sarah plans to meet friends and go to the 1:30 p.m. matinee of a movie on Friday, June 3rd. Her local specialized
transportation service provider offers daily service from 6 a.m. to midnight. The specialized transportation service provider must
accept Sarah’s booking request by 9 p.m. (three hours before midnight) on Thursday June 2nd.

Accessible Booking

Specialized transportation service providers must provide an accessible means to accept reservations.

This will make sure that people with disabilities can make bookings for specialized transportation services. For example,
specialized transportation service providers may offer the options of making a booking online and over the telephone.

Section 72: Trip Restrictions

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

72(1) No specialized transportation service provider shall limit the availability of specialized transportation services to persons
with disabilities by,

(a) restricting the number of trips a person with a disability is
able to request; or (b) implementing any policy or operational practice that unreasonably limits the availability of specialized
transportation services.

(2) Specialized transportation service providers shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2014.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is to prevent specialized transportation service providers from limiting the availability of
their services to people with disabilities.

When do Organizations have to Comply

The requirement applies to specialized transportation service providers. They must comply by January 1, 2014.

Implementing the Requirement

No Restrictions on Requests for Trips

Specialized transportation service providers may not limit the availability of specialized transportation services to people with
disabilities by restricting the number of trips people with disabilities are able to request.

For instance, they may not restrict the number of trips people with disabilities may request using specialized transportation to
ten trips a week.

Example: Lucy can request travel on her local specialized transportation service to go to and from work, Monday to Friday. On
the weekends, she can request additional trips to go shopping, to
visit friends and to attend concerts.

No Unreasonable Policies or Practices

Specialized transportation service providers may not put a policy or operational practice in place that unreasonably limits
the availability of specialized transportation services to people with disabilities.

For example, a specialized transportation service provider cannot develop a policy that states if a person misses two trips
without cancelling in advance, then that person would no longer be eligible for specialized transportation services.

This provision removes unreasonable and unfair barriers that people with disabilities would not face if they were able to use
conventional transportation services.

Reasonable Limits on Use of Services

Specialized transportation service providers may develop policies or operational practices that place reasonable limits on
the use of their services. The intent of such policies would be to prevent the misuse of the services.

For example, a specialized transportation service provider could institute a policy to make sure that people with disabilities do
not use the service to support their jobs as couriers.

Or, they may develop policies to address people with disabilities who consistently book the services and then, without
cancelling, miss the trips.

Note: Consistently missed trips would not mean occasionally missing two trips in a row. Two missed trips would not be
considered consistent or regular. A reasonable policy would be one that addresses consistent cancellations or no-shows.

Section 74: Companions and Children

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

74(1) Every specialized transportation service provider shall allow companions to travel with persons with disabilities if space
is available and will not result in the denial of service to other persons with disabilities.

(2) Every specialized transportation service provider shall allow dependants to travel with a person with a disability who is
the parent or guardian of the dependant if appropriate child restraint securement systems and equipment are, if required,
available.

(3) Specialized transportation services providers shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2012.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that specialized transportation service providers allow companions and dependent
children to travel with eligible people with disabilities, when possible.

When do Organizations have to Comply

The requirement applies to specialized transportation service providers. They must comply by January 1, 2012.

Implementing the Requirement

Travelling with Companions

Companions may include the spouses, partners or friends of the eligible people with disabilities. A support person is not
considered a companion.

Specialized transportation service providers are required to allow companions to travel with people with disabilities when there
is enough space available. Companions may not accompany people with disabilities if it results in other eligible people with
disabilities being denied service.

When companions travel with people with disabilities on specialized transportation vehicles, they – the
companions – pay the fares they would pay if they were travelling on the conventional transportation system.

Travelling with Dependent Children

Specialized transportation service providers are required to allow dependants to travel with people with disabilities who are
the parents or guardians.

Note: If dependent children require child restraint systems while travelling, then they may only accompany the eligible people
with disabilities when the needed restraint systems are available.

Section 75: School Transportation

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

75 (1) This section applies to every school board that provides transportation services for its students.

(2) School boards to which this section applies shall,

  • ensure that integrated accessible school transportation services are provided for their
    students; or
  • ensure that appropriate alternative accessible transportation services are provided for
    students with disabilities, where in the opinion of the board integrated accessible school transportation services are not
    possible or not the best option for a student with a disability because of the nature of the disability or safety concerns.

(3) School boards to which this section applies shall, in consultation with parents or guardians of students with
disabilities,

  • identify students with disabilities before the commencement of each school year or during
    the school year, based on the needs of the student with a disability;
  • develop individual school transportation plans for each student with a disability that,
    • detail student assistance needs for each student with a disability, and
    • include plans for individual student boarding, securement and deboarding; and
  • identify and communicate to the appropriate parties the roles and responsibilities of the
    transportation provider, the parents or guardians of the student with the disability, the operator of the vehicle used to transport
    the student, appropriate school staff and the student with the disability.

(4) School boards to which this section applies shall meet,

  • the requirements of subsection (2) by July 1, 2011; and
  • the requirements of subsection (3) by January 1, 2014.

(5) In this section,

“school board” means a board as
defined in subsection 1 (1) of the Education Act; (“conseil scolaire”)

“transportation provider” includes an entity or person that has entered into an agreement
with a board for the transportation of students under subsection 190 (6) of the Education Act; (“fournisseur de
services de transport”)

“transportation services” means transportation that a board provides under section 190 of the
Education Act. (“services de transport”)

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that school boards provide accessible school transportation services or accessible alternative
transportation to students with disabilities.

When do Organizations have to Comply

All school boards that provide transportation services to their students

By July 1, 2011

Provide integrated accessible or appropriate alternative accessible transportation services

By January 1, 2014

Consult with parents or the guardians of students with disabilities

These requirements apply to school boards, meaning a district school board or a school authority (as defined under the Education
Act), that provide transportation services to its students.

Under the Education Act:

A district school board means

  • English language public district school board
  • English language separate district school board
  • French language public district school board
  • French language separate district school board

A school authority means

  • a board of a district school area
  • a board of a rural separate school
  • a board of a combined separate school zone
  • a board of a secondary school district established under section 67 of the Education Act
  • a board established under section 68 of the Education Act
  • a board of a Protestant separate school.

Implementing the Requirement

Providing Accessible Transportation

School boards that provide transportation services to their students must provide integrated accessible school transportation
services or appropriate alternative accessible transportation services for their students with disabilities.

Integrated transportation means that all students, including students with disabilities, travel on the same school
transportation vehicles.

This is intended to recognize the value of integrating transportation for students.

Alternative Accessible Transportation

School boards are not required to provide integrated accessible transportation if, in the opinion of the board, integrated
accessible transportation services are not possible or not the best option for a student with a disability because of the nature of the
disability or safety concerns.

In these cases, the boards must provide appropriate alternative accessible transportation services for the students with
disabilities, such as providing service on mobility aid accessible taxicabs.

Example: Alternative accessible transportation services may be appropriate if there is no lifting device on a school bus to board
a student who uses a mobility aid, if a student with a disability cannot safely travel with the other students, or if a student with
a disability requires door-to-door service at the beginning and end of the day.

The school board makes the final decision about whether or not to provide integrated school transportation for students with
disabilities.

Providing Transportation Supports

Identification of Students with Disabilities

School boards must consult with the parents or guardians of students with disabilities to identify those students who have
disabilities before the school year begins, or during the school year if the needs of the students change.

This provision recognizes that much can change for students over the course of a school year, including the following:

  • a student can develop a disability
  • a student’s disability can change
  • a student can move from one jurisdiction or school board to another.

Each school board is responsible for identifying its students with disabilities. The boards remain responsible for developing the
processes used to determine whether or not students with disabilities are eligible for school transportation services.

Developing Individual School Transportation Plans

School boards are also required to develop individual transportation plans to support students with disabilities.

Note: The individual school transportation plan is a separate document from a student’s Individual Education
Plan (IEP), which is also prepared by a board and required by the Ministry of Education.

A school board must consult with the parents or guardians of students with disabilities when developing individual school
transportation plans.

Individual school transportation plans are required for students with disabilities who use school transportation services, whether
that service is provided on a regular school bus or an alternative accessible transportation vehicle.

This includes students with disabilities who use the regular school buses and for whom no formal disability accommodations are
required.

This provision is intended to be proactive and prevent barriers related to transportation from arising in the future. Although some
students with disabilities may not require support or accommodation most of the time, their disabilities must be noted in their
individual school transportation plans. This may consist of simply indicating the student has “x”
disability and that there are no transportation-related accommodation needs at this time. The intent is to make sure that
there is a record of students’ disabilities in case the circumstances pertaining to the disability change.

An individual school transportation plan is not required for students with disabilities who do not use school transportation
services.

Individual school transportation plans must explain in detail what assistance students with disabilities require, including plans
for when they board the vehicles, for securement, and when deboarding the vehicles.

Example: Stephen uses a wheelchair and requires a mobility aid accessible vehicle. Paul does not need help climbing the steps when
he boards the school bus but does need help going down them when he leaves it. Janey has low vision and needs someone to walk with her
to her school bus.

Roles and Responsibilities

School boards must consult with the parents or guardians of students with disabilities to identify and communicate the roles
and responsibilities of the following people and organizations:

  • transportation provider – usually school bus companies that have contracts with the board
  • parents or guardians of the student with the disability
  • operators of the vehicles used to transport the student (i.e. the driver)
  • appropriate school staff
  • students with a disability.

This will make sure that all persons and parties are aware of their roles and responsibilities as well as those of the others who
are involved.

This also helps to create a seamless process and to promote a greater understanding and awareness of the needs of the students
with disabilities.

Definitions

For the purposes of this requirement, the following definitions apply:

  • Transportation provider – this includes an entity or person that has entered into an agreement with a board
    for the transportation of students under subsection 190 (6) of the Education Act
  • Transportation services – this means transportation that a board provides under section 190 of the
    Education Act .

Section 76: Public Sector Organizations

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

76 (1) Designated public sector organizations described in paragraphs 2, 3 and 4 of Schedule 1 that are not primarily in the
business of transportation, but that provide transportation services, shall provide accessible vehicles or equivalent services
upon request.

(2) For the purposes of subsection (1), transportation services do not include campus security services provided by a designated
public sector organization described in paragraph 3 or 4 of Schedule 1.

(3) Designated public sector organizations referred to in subsection (1) shall meet the requirements of this section by July
1, 2011.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that hospitals, colleges and universities that provide transportation services will provide
accessible transportation to people with disabilities.

If their general transportation services are not accessible, then they must provide an equivalent service.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Every hospital as defined in section 1 of the Public Hospitals Act

Every college of applied arts and technology established under the Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology Act

Every university in Ontario, including its affiliated and federated colleges, that receives annual operating grants from the
Government of Ontario

By July 1, 2011

Implementing the Requirement

Definitions

For the purposes of this requirement, the following definitions apply:

  • The term “hospital” refers to a hospital as defined in section 1 of the Public Hospitals Act.
  • The term “college” refers to a college of applied arts and technology established under the
    Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology Act
  • The term “university” refers to a university in Ontario, including its affiliated and federated
    colleges that receives annual operating grants from the Government of Ontario

Accessible Transportation Services

Hospitals, colleges and universities can offer transportation services in either an integrated manner or through an equivalent
service.

If requested, all hospitals, colleges and universities that provide transportation services are required to provide accessible
transportation vehicles to people with disabilities who are eligible to use the services.

If a transportation vehicle is not accessible to people with disabilities, then the organization is not required to make
modifications or to retrofit the vehicle. However, the organization is required to provide an equivalent service to accommodate the
needs of people with disabilities.

Equivalent service means that the transportation service is of similar quality to that provided to others using the
organization’s transportation services. The equivalent service would have the similar fares, schedules and
routes.

Note: Transportation services offered by college or university campus security does not have to meet the requirements of this
regulation.

Examples

Accessible vehicle – A college shuttle bus transfers students from one campus to another or from the local train stop to the
campus. This shuttle bus is equipped with two spaces for people with disabilities who use mobility aids, and the service is
available at all campus stop locations.

Equivalent service – A hospital shuttle bus drives individuals between two affiliated city hospitals. This shuttle bus cannot be
retrofitted to be accessible for people with disabilities. As a result, the hospital must provide an equivalent method of
transportation on request, such as contracting with an accessible taxicab.

Section 77: Ferries

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

77 (1) Designated public sector organizations that operate ferries that are under provincial jurisdiction shall do so in
accordance with the Code of Practice entitled “Ferry Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities” (“the Code”).

(2) Designated public sector organizations that operate ferries to which this section applies shall meet the requirements of
sections 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.11, 2.12, 2.13 and 3 of the Code by July 1, 2011.

(3) Designated public sector organizations that operate ferries to which this section applies shall ensure that its ferries that
are manufactured on or after July 1, 2013 meet the requirements of sections 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 2.8, 2.9, 2.10, 2.14, 2.15, 2.16, 2.17,
2.18 and 2.19 of the Code.

(4) The following sections apply, as of the date set out in the sections, with necessary modifications, to ferries to which this
section applies:

  • Section 34 (Availability of information on accessibility equipment, etc.).
  • Section 36 (Accessibility training).
  • Section 37 (Emergency preparedness and response policies).
  • Section 38 (Fares, support persons).
  • Section 44 (General responsibilities).
  • Section 46 (Fares).
  • Section 48 (Storage of mobility aids, etc.).
  • Section 50 (Service disruptions).

(5) In this section,

“Code of Practice” and
“Code” mean the document referred to as a Code of Practice entitled “Ferry
Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities”, published by the Canadian Transportation Agency and dated 1999;
(“Code de pratiques”, “Code”)

“ferry” means a vessel providing passenger transportation services solely within the province of
Ontario, transporting passengers only or passengers and motor vehicles, that may be used by the general public and that weighs
1,000 gross tonnes or more. (“traversier”)

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that ferries, as defined by the regulation, will provide accessible transportation services to
people with disabilities.

When do Organizations have to Comply

The requirement applies to designated public sector organizations that operate ferries that are under provincial
jurisdiction. Ferries must meet the following requirements by the date indicated:

Code of Practice Requirements – to be met by July 1, 2011

  • 2.1 Signage
  • 2.2 Means to Communicate Verbal Messages
  • 2.3 Supplemental Passenger Briefing Cards
  • 2.4 Lighting
  • 2.11 Operator-provided Wheelchairs
  • 2.12 Telephones
  • 2.13 Alarms
  • 3 Maintenance

Code of Practice Requirements – for ferries manufactured on or after July 1, 2013

  • 2.5 Stairways
  • 2.6 Handrails
  • 2.7 Corridors and Passageways
  • 2.8 Floors
  • 2.9 Doorways and Doors
  • 2.10 Counters
  • 2.14 Elevators
  • 2.15 Vehicle Decks
  • 2.16 Passenger Lounges
  • 2.17 Cafeterias
  • 2.18 Cabins
  • 2.19 Washrooms

Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation requirements – to be met by the dates set out in the regulation.

  • Section 34 (Availability of Information on Accessibility Equipment)
  • Section 36 (Accessibility Training)
  • Section 37 (Emergency Preparedness and Response Policies)
  • Section 38 (Fares, Support Persons)
  • Section 44 (General Responsibilities)
  • Section 46 (Fares)
  • Section 48 (Storage of Mobility Aids)
  • Section 50 (Service Disruptions)

For more information on Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation requirements and dates, please go to the above sections
in this Guide.

Implementing the Requirement

For the purposes of this regulation, a ferry is a vessel that weighs 1000 gross tonnes or more, is used by the general public and
operates only within Ontario. A ferry may carry only passengers or passengers and motor vehicles.

Currently, this definition only captures the MS Chi-Cheemaun, operated by the Owen Sound Transportation Company.

Federal Code of Practice Requirements

Designated public sector organizations that operate ferries that are under provincial jurisdiction are required to do so in
accordance with the Code of Practice, entitled Ferry Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities .

The Code of Practice is published by the Canadian Transportation Agency and dated 1999.

Requirements and dates related to the Code of Practice are noted above in “When Do Organizations Have to
Comply”.

Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation Requirements

The Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation includes additional accessibility features and requirements that are not
addressed in the Code of Practice.

As a result, designated public sector organizations that operate ferries that are under provincial jurisdiction are also required to
meet the specific Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation
requirements and dates noted above in “When Do Organizations Have to Comply”.

For more information on Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation requirements and dates, please go to the above sections
in this Guide.

Section 78: Duties of Municipalities – General

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

78 (1) Any municipality that provides conventional transportation services shall consult with its municipal
accessibility advisory committee, where one has been established in accordance with subsection 29 (1) or (2) of the Act, the public and persons with disabilities in the development of accessible design
criteria to be considered in the construction, renovation or replacement of bus stops and shelters.

(2) Every municipality to which subsection (1) applies shall identify planning for accessible bus stops and shelters, including
any steps that will be taken to meet the goal of accessible bus stops and shelters, in its accessibility plan required under Part
I.

(3) Where a municipality has entered into arrangements with a person respecting the construction of bus stops and shelters in its
jurisdiction, the municipality shall ensure that the person participates in the consultation and planning as described in
subsections (1) and (2).

(4) Municipalities shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2013.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all municipalities that provide conventional transportation services will consult on and
plan for accessible bus stops and shelters in their communities.

When do Organizations have to Comply

All municipalities that offer conventional transportation services must meet these requirements by January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

Consultation

Any municipality that provides conventional transportation services must consult with the public and people with disabilities
in the development of accessible design criteria to be considered in the construction, renovation or replacement of bus stops and
shelters.

Municipalities with an Accessibility Advisory Committee established in accordance with subsection 29 (1) or (2) of the
Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act must also consult with the committee.

Planning for Accessible Bus Stops and Shelters

All municipalities that provide conventional transportation services must identify planning for accessible bus stops and bus
shelters.

This planning must include the steps that will be taken to meet the goal of accessible bus stops and shelters.

All the planning, including the steps that will be taken, must be included in municipalities’ Accessibility
Plans, as outlined in Section 4.

For more information, please go to the General Requirement, Section 4, “Accessibility Plans
.

Note: The Integrated Accessibility Standard Regulation does not set a specific timeline for all bus stops or shelters to be made
accessible.

Third Party Contracts

Some municipalities contract out the responsibility for bus stops and shelters to a third party, such as the local conventional
transportation service provider or a private business.

In such cases, the municipality must make sure that the third party participates in the consultation and planning as described
above.

In some municipalities, several organizations may have responsibility for different bus stops and shelters. In these
situations, it is important that municipalities provide clear public communication about who is responsible for specific stops
and shelters. This will make it possible for the general public including people with disabilities to contact the right
organization with concerns, questions and comments.

Section 79: Duties of Municipalities – Accessible Taxicabs

Requirement as Stated in the Regulation

79 (1) Every municipality shall consult with its municipal accessibility advisory committee, where one has been established in
accordance with subsection 29 (1) or (2) of the Act, the public and persons with disabilities to determine the proportion of on-demand accessible taxicabs required in the community.

(2) Every municipality shall identify progress made toward meeting the need for on-demand accessible taxicabs, including any
steps that will be taken to meet the need, in its accessibility plan required under Part I.

(3) Municipalities shall meet the requirements of this section by January 1, 2013.

(4) In this section, “accessible taxicab” means an accessible taxicab as defined in
section 1 of Regulation 629 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1990 (Vehicles for the Transportation of Physically Disabled
Persons) made under the Highway Traffic Act.

Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is that all municipalities will consult on and take steps to meet the need for on-demand accessible
taxicabs in their communities.

When do Organizations have to Comply

All municipalities must meet the accessible taxicabs requirement by January 1, 2013.

Implementing the Requirement

Definitions

Accessible Taxicab – The Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation uses the same definition of
“accessible taxicab” as Section 1,
Regulation 629 “Accessible Vehicles”
, under the Highway Traffic Act.

In general, an accessible taxicab is a vehicle which can safely and comfortably transport a passenger with a disability who needs
to remain seated in his or her mobility aid for the duration of the trip.

On-Demand – The term “on-demand” refers to taxicabs that are available on request in the same way as
people who do not need accessible taxicabs may request a taxicab, e.g. by telephoning for one or by hailing one on the street.

This is an important distinction, as many accessible taxicabs are subcontracted to specialized transportation service providers,
or are otherwise booked in advance, and are not available to the general public on demand.

Consultation

All municipalities must consult with the public, including people with disabilities to determine the proportion of on-demand
accessible taxicabs required in the community. The proportion of on-demand accessible taxicabs means the number of on-demand
accessible taxicabs compared to the number of regular taxicabs.

Municipalities with an Accessibility Advisory Committee, established in accordance with subsection 29 (1) or (2) of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA), must also consult with the committee.

Progress and Steps

All municipalities must identify what progress they have made in meeting the need for on-demand accessible taxicabs, including any
steps that will be taken to meet the need. This information must be included in municipalities’ Accessibility
Plans.

For more information about accessibility plans, please go to General Requirements, Section 4, “Accessibility
Plans
” .

Note: The Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation does not state that a certain proportion of the taxicabs licensed by a
municipality must be accessible, nor does the regulation set a timeline.

Section 80: Duties of Municipalities – Taxicabs

Requirement as Stated in Regulation

80 (1) Any municipality that licenses taxicabs shall ensure that owners and operators of taxicabs are prohibited,

  • from charging a higher fare or an additional fee for persons with disabilities than for
    persons without disabilities for the same trip; and
  • from charging a fee for the storage of mobility aids or mobility assistive devices.

(2) Any municipality that licenses taxicabs shall ensure that owners and operators of taxicabs place vehicle registration and
identification information on the rear bumper of the taxicab.

(3) Any municipality that licenses taxicabs shall ensure that owners and operators of taxicabs make available vehicle
registration and identification information in an accessible format
to persons with disabilities who are passengers.

(4) The information in subsection (2) shall meet the requirements of subsection 58 (3).

(5) Municipalities described in this section shall meet the requirements in this section,

  • by July 1, 2011, in respect of subsection (1); and
  • by January 1, 2012, in respect of subsections (2) and (3).

The Intent of this Requirement

The intent of this requirement is to prevent owners and operators of taxicabs from charging people with disabilities more
than they would other passengers.

In addition, taxicabs will display their vehicle registration and identification information and make it available in accessible
formats when requested.

When do Organizations have to Comply

Municipalities that licence taxicabs

Requirements regarding fares and fees by July 1, 2011

Requirements regarding taxicab information by January 1, 2012

Implementing the Requirement

Fees and Fares

Municipalities that licence taxicabs must make sure that owners and operators of taxicabs do not charge a higher fare or an
additional fee to people with disabilities than they would normally charge people without disabilities for the same trip.

Further, municipalities that licence taxicabs must make sure that owners and operators of taxicabs do not charge a fee for the
storage of mobility aids or mobility assistive devices.

Example: An operator of a taxicab cannot charge a person with a disability a fee for collapsing a mobility aid, such as a manual
wheelchair, and placing it into the trunk.

Taxicab Information

Information on Bumpers

Municipalities that licence taxicabs must make sure that owners and operators of taxicabs display vehicle registration and
identification information on the rear bumper of their taxicabs.

For consistency, and to allow for easier recognition for people with disabilities, the information must meet the requirements for
signage, outlined in section 58 (3) of this regulation.

For more information on signage, please go to Transportation,
Section 58, “Signage” .

Having registration and identification information on the rear bumpers will help people with disabilities to identify taxicab
operators that have not treated them properly or fairly. For example, if an operator refused to pick-up a person with a
disability who used a mobility aid because of the extra time required to provide service, then using the identification
information, the person would be able to report the incident to the responsible municipal licensing body.

Information for Passengers

Municipalities that license taxicabs must make sure that owners and operators of taxicabs make vehicle registration and
identification information available in an accessible format to people with disabilities who are passengers.

How this accessible vehicle registration and identification information is provided to passengers is at the discretion of the
municipality.

Example: A municipality could require the information to be translated into Braille and placed on the plastic sleeve located on
the back of the seat that holds the taxicab information. Or, the municipality may require operators to have business cards with
their taxicab information printed in large print or Braille.

Providing vehicle registration and identification information in an accessible format is not only for “complaint” purposes. It will
help people with disabilities who wish to re-book with considerate or pleasant operators. It will also help those who need to complete
a “taxi-chit” and therefore require
the taxicab information.

Appendix A

Glossary

Purpose

This glossary provides a one-stop place to find meanings of key words and phrases used in the Policy Guidelines to support the
Integrated Accessibility Standard Regulation.

Many of the terms are also defined in the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation. In the event of a conflict, the
regulation prevails. Other words and phrases that are not defined in the regulation have been included in this glossary to help
organizations understand and implement the requirements of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation.

In some cases, links are provided for more detailed information.

Terms and definitions

accessibility equipment — equipment intended to remove barriers
for people with disabilities. Accessibility equipment includes lifting devices, power lifts, power ramps, mobility aids,
securement devices, etc.

accessibility features — features intended to remove barriers for people with disabilities. This can include signage, accessible
washrooms and automated communications systems, as well as technical features (e.g. software) and structural features (e.g.
physical design, including hardware or product specifications)

accessible formats — formats that are an alternative to standard print and are accessible to people with disabilities.
Accessible formats may include large print, Braille, recorded audio and electronic formats such as DVDs, CDs, screen readers, etc.

accessibility plan — a plan that describes the actions an organization will take to prevent and remove barriers and when it
will do so.

accessible taxicab — a taxicab, as defined in section 1 of Regulation 629 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1990
(Accessible Vehicles) made under the Highway Traffic Act.

allocated mobility aid space — refers to a portion of a vehicle that is specifically designed and designated for the use of people
with disabilities who use mobility aids.

bus — refers to a motor vehicle designed to carry 10 or more passengers, and used for transporting people.

communications — the term communications as it is used in the Information and Communications Standard refers to the interaction
between two or more people or entities when information is provided, sent or received.

communication supports — supports that individuals with disabilities may need to access information. Some examples include
plain language, sign language, as well as reading the information out loud to a person with vision loss, adding captioning to videos
or using written notes to communicate with someone who is hard of hearing.

commuter rail — is a class of rail-based, multi-unit transportation. Commuter rail is used for public passenger
transportation between urban areas and their suburbs and is provided on designated lines between stations.

conventional transportation service provider — refers to a designated public sector organization as described in paragraph 5
of Schedule 1 of the Integrated Accessibility Standard Regulation , that provide conventional transportation services that operate only
within Ontario.

conventional transportation services — refers to public passenger transportation services on transit buses, motor coaches
or rail-based transportation that operate only within Ontario. These services are provided by designated public sector
organizations as described in paragraph 5 of Schedule 1 of the Integrated Accessibility Standard Regulation , but does not include
specialized transportation services.

conversion-ready formats — refers to any electronic or digital format that facilitates conversion into accessible formats, such as
Braille, large print, audio cassettes, CDs, DVDs, etc.

Designated public sector organization — refers to organizations listed in Schedule 1 of
the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation (Broader Public Sector). These organizations include hospitals, universities,
colleges of applied arts and technology, district school boards and organizations that provide public transportation such as
municipalities.

Designated public sector also means every municipality and every person or organization listed in Column 1 of Table 1 of Ontario Regulation 146/10 of the Public Service of Ontario Act, 2006.

documented individual accommodation plan — a plan developed by an employer, in consultation with an employee with a disability
that documents the accommodations that will be provided so the employee can do his/her job. These plans are living documents. They
are to be reviewed regularly.

education and training institutions — refers to the following organizations:

  • all educational or training organizations including private schools that are governed by the Education Act or the Private Career Colleges Act , 2005
  • all organizations that offer all or part of a post-secondary program that leads to a degree under a consent granted through the
    Post-secondary Education Choice and Excellence Act, 2000
  • all universities in Ontario as well as their affiliated and federated colleges that receive annual operating grants from the
    province and all colleges of applied arts and technology that were established under the Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology Act , 2002.
  • all private and public organizations that provide courses or programs that offer diplomas or certificates named by the Minister
    of Education under paragraph 1 subsection 8(1) of the Education Act .

Extranet website — is an extension of an organization’s intranet website
or internal network. The extranet website allows outside users with
internet connections controlled access to an organization’s internal network usually for
specific business or educational purposes.

fare — is the fee paid by passengers allowing them to use public transportation such as a train, bus or ferry.

fare structure — refers to the fare price. It is determined by the fare media such as cash, tickets, passes and bulk quantity
discounts, and by the fare category such as adults, seniors and students. A fare structure does not include promotional fares,
which transportation service providers may offer from time to time.

ferry — refers to a vessel that weighs 1000 gross tonnes or more and provides passenger transportation services only within
Ontario. Ferries are used by the general public and may carry only passengers or passengers and motor vehicles.

Government of Ontario — refers to the executive of the government and operational branches,
including all the ministries of the Government of Ontario and the Office of the Premier.

grab bar — refers to any device on board a vehicle that is designed to allow passengers to grip or hold onto it while they
manoeuvre through the vehicle. Grab bars are also designed to provide passengers with more stable rides while on board a
vehicle.

handhold — refers to any device on board a vehicle that is designed to allow passengers to grip or hold onto it while they
manoeuvre through the vehicle. Handholds are also designed to provide passengers with more stable rides while on board a
vehicle.

handrail — refers to a narrow rail, which may be horizontal, vertical or angled that may be grasped as a support. A handrail is
designed to allow passengers to grip or hold on to it while they manoeuvre through the vehicle or to provide a more stable ride
while on board the vehicle.

individualized workplace emergency response information — refers to the information
prepared by employers, in consultation with their employees who have disabilities, to help them prepare for emergencies such as
fire, severe weather and power outages.

information — the term information as it is used in the Information and Communications Standard refers to knowledge, data
and facts that convey meaning and that exist in any format such as
text, audio, digital or images.

inter-city rail — is a class of rail-based, multi-unit
transportation that operates between cities or towns and is used
for public passenger transportation. Inter-city rail is intended
for express service that covers long distances with routes connecting two or more distinct or major locations.

internet website — an organization’s external website that is available to the public and contains a
collection of related web pages, images, videos and other digital assets. It is accessible through an Internet address known as a
Uniform Resources Identifier (URI).

intranet website — an internal website that allows an organization to share its information or network operating system
securely with other members of the organization, and includes extranet websites .

large designated public sector organization — refers to designated public sector organizations with 50 or more
employees.

large organization — refers to a private or not-for-profit organization that provides goods, services or facilities to the
public, or to other organizations, and has 50 or more employees in
Ontario. See obligated organizations below. It does not include the
Government of Ontario, Legislative Assembly, or designated public sector organizations. Large organizations are hereafter also
referred to as “large private or not-for-profit organization” in these guidelines.

Legislative Assembly — refers to the offices of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario
including all the offices of the members of provincial parliament (MPPs), their constituency offices in their ridings and the offices
of those appointed on the address of the assembly, such as the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.

library board — refers to a board as defined in the Public Libraries Act . It also refers to a board established under the
Northern Services Board Act or a county library established under the County of Lambton Act, 1994, the County of Elgin Act, 1985 or
the County of Lennox and Addington Act, 1978.

lifting device — is a platform that moves between a lowered position that is usually level with the ground and a raised
position that is at the height of the floor inside the vehicle. These are generally used on motor coaches and located in the middle
of the vehicle.

light rail — is a class of rail-based, multi-unit transportation that is used for public passenger transportation.
Light rail transportation is provided on designated lines between stations and is intended for light loads and fast movement.

medical aid — refers to an assistive device, including respirators and portable oxygen supplies.

mobility aid — refers to devices used to facilitate the transport, in a seated posture, of people with disabilities.

mobility assistive device — refers to a cane, walker or similar aid.

motor coach — is a class of bus of monocoque design, which provides intercity, suburban or commuter passenger transportation
service. A motor coach has a baggage storage area that is separate from the passenger cabin.

Obligated organization — refers to the Government of Ontario , Legislative Assembly and
designated public sector organizations as well as the large and small organizations to which the standards of the Integrated
Accessibility Standards Regulation apply.

portable bridge plate — is a device with a flat surface that spans the short distances between railcars and loading platforms.

rail-based transportation — refers to any single or multi-unit passenger transportation vehicle that operates exclusively on
rails. Rail-based transportation includes streetcars, subways, light rail vehicles, commuter rail and inter-city rail. Rail-based
transportation is operated by a public transportation organization as described in paragraph 5 of Schedule 1 of the Integrated
Accessibility Standards Regulation .

ramp — refers to a sloped surface that moves between a retracted position to an extended position by flipping or sliding
the extension. Ramps are generally located at the accessible entrance door of a vehicle.

riser height — is the space between the rear base of a step and the top front edge of the next step.

school board — refers to a “board” as defined in subsection
1(1) of the Education Act .

self-service kiosk — refers to those interactive electronic terminals, including point of sale devices that allow the general
public to independently access one or more services or products or
both.

small designated public sector organization — refers to designated public sector organizations with at least one employee
but fewer than 50 employees to which the standards of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation apply.

small organization — refers to a private or not-for-profit organization that provides goods, services or facilities to the
public, or to other organizations, and has at least one but fewer than 50 employees in Ontario. See obligated organizations above. It
does not include the Government of Ontario, Legislative Assembly, or designated public sector organizations. Small organizations are
hereafter, also referred to as “small private or not-for-profit organization” in these guidelines.

specialized transportation service provider — refers to a designated public sector transportation organization, described in
paragraph 5 of Schedule 1 of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation that provides specialized transportation services that
operate only in Ontario.

specialized transportation services — refers to public passenger transportation services that are designed to transport
people with disabilities and that operate only within Ontario. These services are provided by designated public sector
transportation organizations as described in paragraph 5 of Schedule 1 of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation
.

specialized transportation services conditional eligibility — refers to the designation given by
specialized transportation service providers to people with disabilities who are unable to consistently use conventional
transportation services because of physical or environmental
barriers.

specialized transportation services “” temporary eligibility — refers to the designation given by
specialized transportation service providers to people with temporary disabilities that prevent them from using conventional
transportation services.

specialized transportation services “” unconditional eligibility — refers to the designation given by
specialized transportation service providers to people with disabilities that prevent them from using conventional
transportation services.

stanchion — refers to a horizontal or vertical pole that is designed to be used as a handhold. It may be padded to reduce or
cushion the impact of any accidental contact.

step nosing — is the outward tip of a step that is intended to assist with gripping and seeing the steps.

streetcar — is a class of rail-based transportation designed to operate on a highway, as defined in the Highway Traffic Act.

subway — is a class of rail-based transportation, which is multi-unit and provides service on designated lines between
stations. A subway is designed to operate on a grade separated from highways, as defined in the Highway Traffic Act.

support person — refers to a person who accompanies a person with a disability to help with communication, mobility, personal
care or medical needs, or with access to goods, services or facilities.

taxicab — is a motor vehicle as defined in the Highway Traffic Act that is licensed as a taxicab by a municipality and has a
seating capacity of not more than six people, not including the driver. A taxicab is hired for one specific trip to transport one
person or a group of people for which only one fare or charge is collected or made for the trip. A taxicab is not a car pool
vehicle.

transit bus — is a class of bus that is designed and intended to be used for passenger transportation. Transit buses are operated
on highways, as defined in the Highway Traffic Act,

tread depth — is the horizontal stepping surface of a step.

unconvertible material — refers to any information that cannot
be converted into accessible formats. For instance, some sectors or organizations might not have easy access to technology that allows
them to convert some material into accessible formats. In other cases, certain information such as that in a textbook might be
difficult to convert into accessible formats or conversion ready formats without losing the meaning of the material.

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) — is an international standard for making websites and web content
accessible to people with a wide-range of disabilities. A team of experts from around the world developed WCAG.

The first version, WCAG 1.0, was released in 1999. WCAG 2.0 was released in 2008. More information on WCAG development and website
accessibility can be found at http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag .

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 Level A and Level AA — refers to different conformance levels in WCAG 2.0. To meet
conformance Level A all Level A success criteria need to be met; to
meet conformance Level AA all Level A and AA success criteria need to be met

More information on WCAG development and website accessibility can be found at http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag .

web page “” means a non-embedded resource obtained from a single Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) using
Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) and any other resources that are used in the rendering or intended to be rendered together with it
by a user agent.

workplace emergency response plan — please see individualized workplace emergency response information.

Revised, Edited and condensed from http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/accessibility/other_standards/iasr_2012/toc_iasr.aspx