Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) Welcomes You!

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The AODA Clock is Ticking

There are   till a fully Accessible Ontario! Will you be compliant?

Latest Headlines

How FMs Can Support Employment Standards

Latest phase of accessibility regulations rolls out on path to barrier-free Ontario by 2025 Friday, February 5, 2016
By Michelle Ervin

Imagine approaching an elevator in the PATH system, reading a sign that says “buzz for assistance,” and waiting 20 minutes for security to come operate the otherwise standard lift. Imagine pulling a vehicle into an accessible space, then navigating the parking lot uphill in a wheelchair, over speed bumps, to find the pay-and-display ticket dispenser, only to realize that it’s out of reach. Imagine clasping a grab bar in a bathroom stall and watching it rip clear out of the wall.

The Wynne Government Gives the Public up to March 14, 2016 to Comment on the Text of Proposed Regulations that Would Revise Ontario Accessibility Standards

The Wynne Government Barrels Ahead with Plans to Break Kathleen Wynne’s Promise Not to Weaken Accessibility Protections

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities www.aodaalliance.org aodafeedback@gmail.com Twitter: @aodaalliance

February 5, 2016

SUMMARY

So Much For Accessibility in Ontario

by wheelchairdemon

Over the last few months I have observed a disturbing trend. The Point of Sale Terminals, where one can pay for goods using their debit card and entering a PIN number, are being locked down solidly to the checkout counters at a height that is unmanageable to use by a person who uses a wheelchair.

Read more at
http://wheelchairdemon.blogspot.ca/2016/02/so-much-for-accessibility-in-ontario.html

New year, New Accessibility Obligations

February 03 2016
Employment & Benefits Canada

Introduction

As more provinces consider implementing proactive accessibility legislation like Ontario’s Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, ongoing compliance should be a New Year’s resolution. Employers outside of Ontario and federally regulated employers are not required to comply with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act. However, employees, customers and human rights adjudicators across Canada are increasingly aware of accessibility issues and look to the act for best practice.

AODA Alliance Sends the Deloitte Company its Submission on the First Phase of the Deloitte Company’s Public Consultation on the Wynne Government’s Problem-Ridden Proposal to Fund a New Private Accessibility Certification Process

Deloitte’s Draft Report on its Consultations to Date is Seriously Flawed and Ignores or Rejects the AODA Alliance’s Key Input

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities www.aodaalliance.org aodafeedback@gmail.com Twitter: @aodaalliance

February 1, 2016

SUMMARY

The AODA Alliance has finalized and submitted its initial submission on the Wynne Government’s problem-ridden proposal to establish and fund a private accessibility certification process in Ontario. We sent our written feedback to the private Deloitte company. The Wynne Government hired Deloitte to conduct this public consultation on the Government’s proposal to establish a private accessibility certification process.

Toronto Star Reports on Massive Private Sector Violations of Ontario’s Disability Accessibility Law and Continued Weak Enforcement – Wynne Governments Reported Response Is Quite Troubling

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities http://www.aodaalliance.org aodafeedback@gmail.com Twitter: @aodaalliance

January 27, 2016

SUMMARY

Will New Accessible Parking Permits Combat Abuse?

Service Ontario rolls out new safeguards against people without disabilities taking advantage of accessible parking spots and free parking by Aaron Broverman
January 19, 2016

The government of Ontario has launched new accessible parking permits (APP) to combat abuse by those who don’t need them.

In Toronto alone, parking enforcement investigated and retained more than 800 APPs and charged over 700 people with abuse-related offences in 2015. Those numbers matched similar stats from the previous year.

Wynne Government Refuses to Waive Its $4,250 Fee for Fully Answering AODA Alliance Chair David Lepofskys Freedom of Information Application Seeking Important Government Records on the AODAs Implementation and Enforcement

Lepofsky Asks the Wynne Government to Reconsider This Refusal

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities www.aodaalliance.org aodafeedback@gmail.com Twitter: @aodaalliance

January 18, 2016

SUMMARY

When it comes to the accessibility rights of people with disabilities, how free is Freedom of Information in Ontario? Is Premier Wynne keeping her promise to ensure that hers is the most open and transparent government in Canada?

Advocate Pushes Gas Station Aid for Disabled People

By Paul Lungen, Staff Reporter –
January 14, 2016

Edward Rice understands the limitations a disability can create, even when you are trying to perform a simple task like filling your car’s tank with gasoline.

Rice had polio, but in the past, he was able to drive thanks to special modifications that were made to his minivan. A built-in winch helped get his scooter in and out of the vehicle, and he was able to drive using hand controls.

York Student Wins Mental-Health Fight; University Will No Longer Require Medical Diagnosis Before Providing Academic Accommodations

Diana Zlomislic
The Toronto Star , Jan. 13, 201613)

Navi Dhanota knew she needed some help to score top grades in university, but this time she wasn’t prepared to return to a psychiatrist’s chair to get it. She didn’t think any student should have to disclose their private mental-health diagnosis for the privilege of academic accommodations such as getting extra time to hand in an assignment or test.