Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) Welcomes You!

We hope you find this site a great resource for all things to do with the AODA and that you'll come back often as we continually update the site.

This site is part of the Accessibility News Network.

Note: This is NOT a Government run Site!!.

The AODA Clock is Ticking

There are   till a fully Accessible Ontario! Will you be compliant?

Latest Headlines

Toronto Star Reports on Wynne Government Weakening the 2007 Customer Service Accessibility Standard

and on Toronto Transit Commission Delays in Ensuring Accessibility of Public Transit in Canada’s Largest City

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities www.aodaalliance.org aodafeedback@gmail.com Twitter: @aodaalliance

June 23, 2016

SUMMARY

Two important Toronto Star reports this week illustrate how far Ontario falls short of the Wynne Government’s claim to be a global leader on disability accessibility. These news reports come just eight and a half years before the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act’s mandatory 2025 deadline for the Ontario Government to have led Ontario to become fully accessible to 1.8 million people with disabilities.

Ontario Missing Mark on Accessibility Standards, Activist Says

Blind lawyer and disability rights activist David Lepofsky says Ontario must reverse a recent regulatory change that he says weakens its target to make the province fully accessible by 2025. By Laurie MonsebraatenSocial justice reporter
Thu., June 23, 2016

Toronto lawyer David Lepofsky implores province to reverse recent regulatory change that he says weakens target of becoming fully accessible by 2025.

Tracy MacCharles, Ontario’s new minister responsible for accessibility, says businesses will still be required to comply with the law concerning accessibility regardless of whether or not they have a written policy.

Reasonable Accommodation Includes Electronic Accessibility

6/16/2016
by
Kate Bischoff
Zelle LLP

Computers, mobile devices, and the Internet are integral parts of today’s workplace. Employees email, log into various systems and programs, complete employer forms, and manage their time online. Job seekers research employers and submit job applications online. For the 56.7 million Americans with disabilities, these simple tasks may be impossible unless electronic systems are accessible.

Ramp Up 2016 Aims to Double Number of Accessible Ramps in Ontario

An accessibility advocate has partnered with 24 local visual artists in an effort to bring ramps into 15 more communities.

Luke Anderson is working to increase the number of accessible ramps in communities across the province. By: Gilbert Ngabo Metro Published on Thu Jun 16 2016

A new campaign wants to double the number of accessible ramps on buildings and businesses across Ontario.

ACTION LINE: How consumers with a disability can encounter prejudice, discrimination

Spectator columnist Al MacRury says he must present his passport when buying a cellphone in Ontario because he does not possess a driver’s licence. Hamilton Spectator
By Al MacRury
Jun 13, 2016

Being a consumer can be a hard enough job.

There are many rules and regulations. Laws are always changing. Store policies you may know nothing about. Manufacturer’s warranties. Conditions for returns and exchanges.

And the scams. You must be on guard when answering your phone, surfing websites and placing overseas orders for goods and services.

Premier Wynne Appoints Tracy MacCharles as Ontario’s First Minister of Accessibility for 1.8 Million Ontarians with Disabilities

Will Premier Wynne Instruct Her to Take the Actions Needed to Get Ontario Back on Schedule for Full Accessibility By 2025 The Deadline that Ontario’s Accessibility Law Sets?

ACCESSIBILITY FOR ONTARIANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT ALLIANCE
June 13, 2016

Toronto: In today’s mid-term Cabinet shuffle, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne appointed Tracy MacCharles as Ontario’s first virtually stand-alone Accessibility Minister. This took place on the 11th anniversary of the day when Ontario’s accessibility law, the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA), went into force.

More Reflections on Premier Wynne’s Breaking Her Promise Not to Weaken Protections We’ve Won In or Under Ontario’s Disabilities Act

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities http://www.aodaalliance.org aodafeedback@gmail.com Twitter: @aodaalliance

Further Reflections on the Wynne Governments Weakening the 2007 Customer Service Accessibility Standard and Premier Wynnes Broken Promise Never to Weaken Protections or Provisions Wed Won In or Under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act

June 9, 2016

SUMMARY

Premier Wynne Breaks Important Promise to 1.8 Million Ontarians with Disabilities to Never Weaken Any Protections We’d Won under Ontario’s Disabilities Act

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities http://www.aodaalliance.org/ aodafeedback@gmail.com
Twitter: @aodaalliance

A Sad Game-Changer for 1.8 Million Ontarians with Disabilities – Premier Kathleen Wynne Breaks a Solemn Written Promise She Gave to People with Disabilities While Running for Ontario Liberal Leadership, to Never Weaken Any Protections We’d Won In or Under Ontario’s Disabilities Act June 7, 2016

SUMMARY

Local MPP Introduces Private Member’s Bill for Service Dogs in Public Places

CTV Kitchener
Published Monday, June 6, 2016

Kitchener-Conestoga MPP Michael Harris announced that he will introduce a private members bill, making it an offence to deny access to service animals inside public spaces, including schools.

Harris decided to introduce the legislation, after several families complained, claiming that the Waterloo Catholic District School Board, wont allow their childrens service dogs to spend the day at school.

New Ontario Accessibility Rules Inadequate: Critic

TORONTO Coming changes to the rules governing accessible customer service in Ontario are being decried as inadequate by at least one group representing the clientele the regulations are meant to help.

They argue that changes increasing the number of workers requiring accessibility training, and expanding the number of professionals authorized to vouch for the need for a service animal, do little to directly impact the lives of people with disabilities.