Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act(AODA) Welcomes You!

We hope you find this site a great resource for all things to do with the AODA and that you'll come back often as we continually update the site.

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Latest Headlines

Wynne Government Still Hasn’t Appointed an Education Standards Development Committee, Fully 314 Days After Premier Wynne Pledged to Create an Education Accessibility Standard under Ontario’s Disabilities Act

and

Last Day to Complete the Wynne Government’s Online Survey about Disability Barriers in Ontario’s Education System

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities http://www.aodaalliance.org aodafeedback@gmail.com Twitter: @aodaalliance

October 16, 2017

SUMMARY

Levelling the Playing Field

The role of accommodations in academia
By: Hillary Jones, Contributor
Posted on October 16, 2017

Lakehead, like all other universities and businesses in Ontario, is required to comply with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). If you’ve had a job in Ontario at any point in your life, you’ve likely been told about the AODA along with other standard workplace trainings like WHMIS. When you’re sitting through these often monotonous training days, it can be easy to lose sight of the relevance of these policies to our daily lives. However, as midterm season is upon us, one university policy relating to the AODA may become more prominent: accommodations.

Additional Regulation Isn?t Necessary to Resolve the Issue of Fake Service Animals

James A. Kutsch, Jr. PhD
President and CEO, The Seeing Eye
Originally posted October 5, 2016
Editors Note: While this article refers to the US it can easily be applied in Canada.

News stories across the nation continue to report an increase in the number of people who pretend that their pet dog is a service animal. The major concern stems from the unruly behavior of these supposed service animals, and how their presence jeopardizes the safety and access rights of legitimate service animal teams.

Oshawa Mom Says Its Time to Replace Accessibility Symbol with a more Active Image

News Oct 18, 2017
by Reka Szekely
Oshawa This Week

An Oshawa mom is hoping the city will adopt a new more active accessibility symbol. Amanda Ridding said she first heard about the new symbol two or three years ago. Riddings son Nicklas is a Grandview kid who uses a wheelchair at times.

How a Cool New Fuel App Helps Drivers With Disabilities

Sep 14, 2017

Filling a car with gas can be a frustrating task for drivers with physical disabilities. It can be hard to get out of the car, access a wheelchair or walker, and try to fit the mobility aid between the vehicle and the pump, while still reaching the gas tank.

AODA Alliance Calls On the Wynne Government to Take Action to Ensure Ontario’s Built Environment Becomes Disability-Accessible by 2025

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities http://www.aodaalliance.org aodafeedback@gmail.com Twitter: @aodaalliance

October 23, 2017

SUMMARY

On October 23, 2017, the AODA Alliance wrote the Wynne Government’s Accessibility Minister, Tracy MacCharles. It called for the Government to take immediate and decisive action to ensure that the built environment in Ontario becomes fully accessible by the 2025 deadline that the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act imposes.

No Dogs Allowed: Uber Driver’s Ignorance a Barrier for Deaf-Blind Athlete and Guide Dog

Megan Gillis
Published on: October 23, 2017 | Last Updated: October 23, 2017

Kevin Frost, who is legally deaf and blind, has been initially refused service by Uber three times in the last month as he tried to access it with his service dog, Lewis. That’s against the law.

Being legally deaf and blind hasn’t stopped Kevin Frost from becoming a high-performance athlete and sought-after motivational speaker, but Uber drivers’ ignorance of the law put the brakes on him three times this month.

Toronto Pearson Launches Innovative Technology to Support Accessibility for those with Cognitive Special Needs

News provided by
Greater Toronto Airports Authority

TORONTO, Oct. 25, 2017 /CNW/ – As part of Autism Awareness month in Canada, Toronto Pearson is proud to be the first airport in the world to partner with MagnusCards, an app offering digital how-to guides (Card Decks) for people with autism and other cognitive special needs.

Deadline for 2017 AODA Compliance Report is Coming Up

October 26, 2017

The next compliance reporting deadline for Ontario businesses and not-for-profit organizations is December 31, 2017

Businesses and Not-for-Profits with More Than 20 Employees in Ontario

The Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (“AODA”) mandates that businesses and not-for-profit organizations with at least 20 employees in Ontario file a compliance report once every three years. Accessibility reports must be filed by a director, senior officer, or another “responsible person with authority to bind the organization.”

Grassroots Disability Coalition Unveils Powerful New Video Showing Serious Accessibility Problems at the New Ryerson University Student Learning Centre

On 19th Anniversary of Landmark Unanimous Legislature Resolution Calling for Strong Accessibility Law, this Video Shows Ontario Falling Further Behind Schedule for Becoming Accessible by 2025

ACCESSIBILITY FOR ONTARIANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT ALLIANCE
NEWS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Changes Will Regulate How New Facilities Are Built

category built,articles]
By Jonathan Juha, Postmedia News
Friday, October 27, 2017

Future city-owned buildings and facilities are a step closer to become a bit more accessible for people with disabilities.

Pending formal approval from council, the city’s planning and heritage sub-committee voted unanimously on Thursday in favor of approving new accessibility guidelines, which will regulate how new city facilities are built, as well as any renovation projects done to properties currently owned by the city.

Some People Are Using Accessible Parking Permits of Relatives Who’ve Died, police say

Over 1,300 misused permits seized last year, CBC Toronto has learned By John Lancaster, Michael Smee, CBC News Posted: Oct 31, 2017

Wendy Murphy of Spinal Cord Injury Ontario says she routinely sees people who appear to be misusing accessible parking permits, which means she’s left waiting for a spot.

Abuse of special parking permits for people with disabilities has become so pervasive that on many downtown Toronto streets almost all vehicles display one, a CBC Toronto investigation has found.

U of T?s New Mental Health Policy is Shameful

David Campion-Smith
2017/10/30

The mandatory leave program is only the most recent in a line of poor treatment plans.

Policies shouldn’t force students with mental health issues out of school

In most cases, a university proposing a new measure to provide mental health treatment to students is viewed as something positive. But the University of Toronto’s proposed mandatory leave program is not one of these cases, and in fact is further proof that that school is more concerned with protecting its academic reputation than with the mental wellbeing of its students.

New AODA Alliance Video on Accessibility Problems at Ryerson University Student Learning Centre Gets Great Media Coverage

Over 2,700 Views on YouTube in Four Days Since Its Launch Press Your Member of the Ontario Legislature to Watch It!

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities http://www.aodaalliance.org aodafeedback@gmail.com Twitter: @aodaalliance

November 2, 2017

SUMMARY

Lack of Funding, Resources Blamed for Rise in Classroom Violence

Parents, teachers say children with special needs falling through the cracks Posted on November 1, 2017
By Dave Flaherty/The Oshawa Express

Pamela Downward, former health and safety officer for ETFO Durham, Eva Kyriakides, a member of the Durham District School Board special education advisory committee and Alison Massam, an education advisory member of the Ontario Autism Coalition, were among the speakers at a recent community forum hosted by ETFO Durham, the union representing elementary school teachers.