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AODA Resources

Resources on issues of accessibility and the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA)

Preventing and Removing Information and Communication Barriers, Part 2

In Part 1 of this article, we explored how organizations can prevent or remove information or communication disability barriers. For the most part, removing or preventing information or communication barriers involves accessible formats or Communication supports. In Part 2, we outline other things staff should know about preventing or removing information or communication barriers.


Preventing and Removing Information or Communication Barriers, Part 1

In our last article, we explored how information and communication barriers limit access for people with various disabilities. In this article, we will consider how businesses can prevent or remove barriers. Preventing and removing information or communication barriers makes businesses welcoming to people of all abilities.

Preventing and Removing Information or Communication Barriers, Part 1

Businesses can find many solutions to help people access information and communication.


Disability and Information or Communication Barriers

Information or communication barriers exist because not all people read or understand in the same way. For instance, some information or communication barriers are:

  • Audio-only fire alarms
  • Lack of large print and Braille on elevators, signs, or room numbers
  • Live events or public meetings without captions or Sign language interpretation
  • Forms, pamphlets, or menus offered only in standard-sized print
  • Telephone-only contact information

Preventing and Removing Physical Disability Barriers

In our last article, we explored how physical barriers limit access for people with various disabilities. In this article, we will consider how organizations can prevent or remove barriers. Preventing and removing physical disability barriers makes organizations welcoming to people of all abilities.


Disability and Physical Barriers

Many barriers that people with disabilities face are physical or architectural barriers. Physical barriers happen when features of buildings or spaces limit people’s access. For instance, some physical disability barriers are:

  • Steps without ramps, elevators, or lifts
  • Lack of automatic or push-button doors
  • Low lighting or weak colour contrast
  • Narrow sidewalks, doorways, or aisles
  • High shelves
  • Tables without knee and toe clearance