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What Would a Truly Disabled-Accessible City Look Like?

Most cities are utterly unfriendly to people with disabilities but with almost one billion estimated to be urban-dwellers by 2050, a few cities are undergoing a remarkable shift by Saba Salman
Wed 14 Feb 2018

To David Meere, a visually impaired man from Melbourne, among the various obstacles to life in cities is another that is less frequently discussed: fear.

Universities Join Together to Inspire Students to Use Their Creativity and Innovative Skills to Help Make Communities More Accessible for People With Disabilities

OTTAWA, Feb. 14, 2018 /CNW

Today, St├ęphane Lauzon, Parliamentary Secretary for Sport and Persons with Disabilities, on behalf of the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science and Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities, joined members of Universities Canada to celebrate the upcoming launch of their Innovative Designs for Accessibility (IDeA) program, a national student competition to help remove barriers to accessibility.

uber-ASSIST driver pleads guilty, fined for refusing passenger with a guide dog

For Immediate Release
FEBRUARY 5, 2018

TORONTO: Provincial Offences Court

Almost one year ago, Victoria Nolan (and her guide dog Alan) was refused a ride by a Toronto Uber driver. Nolan, a medal-winning Canadian Paralympic rower, finished training at the Toronto Pan Am Sports Complex when she hailed a ride with UberAssist (designed to provide additional assistance to seniors and people with disabilities) for the first time.

Group Questions LRT Accessibility for Visually Impaired

Alliance for Equality of Blind Canadians meeting with city officials Monday CBC News Posted: Jan 29, 2018

The Ottawa chapter of the Alliance for the Equality of Blind Canadians is concerned Ottawa’s new LRT trains won’t be easily accessible for visually impaired riders.

Just when Ottawa’s new light rail system will be up and running remains an open question, but some blind and visually impaired transit users are already raising concerns the trains won’t be properly equipped to meet their needs.

Companies, Give People With Disabilities Access to the Superhighway

Expand internet access
With a few tweaks to a website, businesses can avoid lawsuits and do what is best for those with disabilities. By Todd Paton
January 16, 2018

The demise of brick-and-mortar retail operations is just one of many examples illustrating our preference for website shopping. Once thought to be the exception, it is now regarded as the rule. The same trend applies for ordering food, banking, and applying for jobs, to name a few more.

We Need to Build Accessibility Into Our Digital Workplaces!

By Martin White | Jan 11, 2018

As our reliance on technology increases within the digital workplace, are we at risk of disenfranchising part of our workforce? PHOTO: Brian Suda

According to the 2010 U.S. Census, one in five people have some form of physical or cognitive disability. And yet as of 2016, only 17.9 percent of people with disabilities were employed, compared with 65.3 percent of people without a disability.

Payment Companies Face Service, Compliance Gaps for the Visually Impaired

By Ernie Crawford
Published January 11 2018

The convenience of online payments can both enhance the customer experience and accelerate the payment cycle and cash flow.

However, this win-win scenario breaks down if the consumer is unable to make use of the payment processing websitewhich may happen if they are blind or partially sighted and the website or the documents contained on it are not made accessible.

Accessibility Awareness Remains Low as Deadline Approaches

By Martin Lind
Dec 11, 2017

Beginning Jan. 18, 2018, government agencies across the U.S. will be required by law to make their websites accessible to the more than 60 million Americans with visual, hearing or other disabilities. Yet more than 87 percent of 430+ local government respondents to Vision’s 2017 What’s Next Survey said they have moderate, weak or no knowledge of federal web accessibility requirements.

Service Dog Handlers Face Bitter Pushback, Kicked Out of Public Places

Canadian Forces vet booted from mall, child with diabetes rejected from public places CBC News
Posted: Nov 22, 2017

Mike Rude says he often has trouble with people who don’t understand that his service dog, Spark, is allowed to accompany him almost everywhere.

Mike Rude, a veteran of nearly three decades with the Canadian Armed Forces, did not expect conflict when he went to the Valley Mall in Corner Brook, N.L., with his service dog, Spark.

Accommodations for Students and Employees With Disabilities Can Take Many Forms

November 10 2017

The Office of Disability Resources and Services fields a lot of calls from faculty, asking about their responsibilities when it comes to accommodating students with disabilities. Office director Leigh Culley understands why.

Zach Crighton, a 17-year-old high school student with cerebral palsy, meets with students in the Compassionate Design course taught by lecturer John Moalli. The students are hoping they can make improvements to Crighton’s wheelchair and communication tools. (Image credit: L.A. Cicero)

Deadline for 2017 AODA Compliance Report is Coming Up

October 26, 2017

The next compliance reporting deadline for Ontario businesses and not-for-profit organizations is December 31, 2017

Businesses and Not-for-Profits with More Than 20 Employees in Ontario

The Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (“AODA”) mandates that businesses and not-for-profit organizations with at least 20 employees in Ontario file a compliance report once every three years. Accessibility reports must be filed by a director, senior officer, or another “responsible person with authority to bind the organization.”

No Dogs Allowed: Uber Driver’s Ignorance a Barrier for Deaf-Blind Athlete and Guide Dog

Megan Gillis
Published on: October 23, 2017 | Last Updated: October 23, 2017

Kevin Frost, who is legally deaf and blind, has been initially refused service by Uber three times in the last month as he tried to access it with his service dog, Lewis. That’s against the law.

Being legally deaf and blind hasn’t stopped Kevin Frost from becoming a high-performance athlete and sought-after motivational speaker, but Uber drivers’ ignorance of the law put the brakes on him three times this month.

Levelling the Playing Field

The role of accommodations in academia
By: Hillary Jones, Contributor
Posted on October 16, 2017

Lakehead, like all other universities and businesses in Ontario, is required to comply with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). If you’ve had a job in Ontario at any point in your life, you’ve likely been told about the AODA along with other standard workplace trainings like WHMIS. When you’re sitting through these often monotonous training days, it can be easy to lose sight of the relevance of these policies to our daily lives. However, as midterm season is upon us, one university policy relating to the AODA may become more prominent: accommodations.

A Campus of Hurdles

Three student perspectives on accessibility issues at U of T By Varsity Contributors
Published: 2:27 am, 25 September 2017

The University of Toronto remains inaccessible to its students in a number of ways. Below, Comment contributors reflect on access to campus spaces, note-taking through Accessibility Services, and the need for comprehensive and detail-oriented accommodation.

Providing notes to those who need them should be a shared effort

Completing your accessibility compliance report

Follow these steps to complete an accessibility compliance report for your business, not-for-profit or public-sector organization.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/completing-your-accessibility-compliance-report/