You are Browsing the Category articles

Canada’s First National Accessibility Law Should Be Ready by Next Spring: Hehr

Kent Hehr speaks in Vancouver, Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2016.
Michelle McQuigge
TORONTO
The Canadian Press
October 15, 2017

The federal minister responsible for crafting Canada’s first national accessibility legislation says the law should be ready by next spring and should benefit not only people with disabilities, but their caregivers.

Kent Hehr says the timeline for the new law has shifted slightly since he took over the portfolio for sport and persons with disabilities in a recent cabinet shuffle.

Win the war on talent: Hire people with disabilities

10 Oct 2017
by Ingrid Muschta and Joe Dale

In this second part of a five-part series, experts from the Ontario Disability Employment Network explain why HR should tap this talent pool.

Local Man Wants Law to Regulate Service Dogs

“The accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 doesn’t currently include legislation that defines proper training and accreditation for service animals’ Chip Kean Certified Professional Dog Obedience Instructor
October 12, 2017
by: Linda Holmes

A professional dog obedience instructor in North Bay is petitioning the Ontario government to pass what he calls ‘much needed’ legislation regulating service dogs and their training.

Chip Kean, is also an associate certified dog behaviour consultant with the IAABC, International Association of Animal Behaviour Consultants, with the dog division. He is currently doing assessments on four potential service dogs.

Making a Home Accessible Can Make All the Difference as We Age

by David Nickle
City Centre Mirror

Aging at home

Med+ Home Health Care manager Ron Wiskin (left) and homeowner Sandra Sexton stands in the acessible bathroom being built at her Hendon Avenue home, on Monday, Sept. 25, that will accommodate her husband and aging parents.

Sandra and Dan Sexton are doing the kind of work on their North York home that usually comes much later in life.

Accessibility Advocates Looking to Expand the Scope of the StopGap Program in the City

‘If you have to ask then it is not accessible’
By Jonathan Juha, Postmedia News
Saturday, October 7, 2017
From left to right, Cindy Walker, Sean Beech and their children, Theodore and Hendrik; UPS employee Ron Musselman; and Roger Koert, chair of the city’s accessibility advisory committee. They are all supporters and beneficiaries of the StopGap initiative and would like to see it expand, so participating businesses leave the ramps outside during business hours.

How an Ottawa Cancer Patient is Trying to Make CHEO More Accessible for Everyone

Bruce Deachman, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: October 6, 2017

Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario(CHEO) CEO Alex Munter and leukemia patient Sarah Telford.

Just before the elevator doors opened at CHEO, Sarah Telford playfully, but pointedly, picked up a nearby yellow caution cone the kind that warn of wet floors, spills and whatnot and placed it in front of the elevator. When the doors opened, the elevator’s lone occupant, hospital CEO Alex Munter, was compelled to negotiate his way around the obstacle as he exited, no small feat considering that he was in a wheelchair.

Exploring a $55-Billion Untapped Market

RichDONOVAN
Special to The Globe and Mail
September 29, 2017

CEO and founder of Return on Disability.

Canadian business has struggled since 1989 to hire people with disabilities in any material numbers. This is not a uniquely Canadian phenomenon. The experience has been repeated globally by millions of companies.

This struggle is rooted in knee-jerk reactions to regulation and can be avoided by doing what business does best: understanding and serving a new market a big new market.

A Prisoner in Her Own Home

By Linda Crabtree, The Standard
Friday, September 29, 2017

In 2008, when Sandra Groves moved into her Roehampton Avenue apartment she was walking. Now, nine years later, due to multiple health issues including a balance and muscle condition, she uses an electric wheelchair to get around if she can get out of her building.

Ontario Taking Steps to Increase Employment for People with Disabilities

New Employers’ Partnership Table to Help Connect People to Jobs and Businesses to Talent September 27, 2017
Accessibility Directorate of Ontario

Ontario has established a new Employers’ Partnership Table to advise the government on innovative ways to connect more people with disabilities to jobs and businesses to talent.

Tracy MacCharles, Minister Responsible for Accessibility, was in Toronto today to make the announcement at the Accessibility Innovation Showcase Employer Forum.

A seriously Flawed Human Rights Tribunal Decision Rules Against the Request of a Nine Year Old Boy with Autism Spectrum Disorder to Bring His Autism Service Dog to School

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities http://www.aodaalliance.org aodafeedback@gmail.com Twitter: @aodaalliance

September 25, 2017

SUMMARY

Here is yet another compelling reason why Ontario needs to enact a strong and effective Education Accessibility Standard under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act to tear down the many unfair disability accessibility barriers that impede students with disabilities in Ontario’s education system. Almost ten months ago, Premier Wynne promised to create an Education Accessibility Standard. Almost 10 months later, no Standards Development Committee has been appointed to start to work on it.

Driving a Taxi is Not a ‘Legal’ Right

TIMES COLONIST, SEPTEMBER 23, 2017
Re: “Taxi driver has rights in dispute with passenger,” letter, Sept. 21.

Guide dogs can greatly increase accessibility for the blind, but
unfortunately they can also result in them being discriminated against and refused services. As a result, governments have passed legislation (e.g.,
Guide and Service Dog Act) to explicitly protect the rights of the blind and to prohibit anyone from denying them access to public buildings or public services. There are no exceptions or exemptions in the legislation.

Blind Man Says Tribunal Ruling Aids in Discrimination

Louise Dickson / Times Colonist
September 20, 2017

Graeme McCreath stood in the B.C. Court of Appeal, his German shepherd guide dog at his feet, and asked the judges to imagine being refused hotel or rental accommodation or having taxis deliberately pass by.

“Imagine not having access to any public place or even service in a restaurant,” McCreath said Tuesday.

“All these things have happened to blind people, not just once, but many times even though we have stringent clear laws protecting the vulnerable.”

Wheel-Trans users fear new program will force them to use inaccessible TTC

TTC hears concerns about long waits and inaccessible stations at annual meeting ByNatalie Nanowski,
September 20, 2017

Michele Gardner (centre) and Robert Muzzy (right) say broken elevators make it difficult to ride the TTC. (Natalie Nanowski/CBC)

Michele Gardner never uses the TTC. Not because of delays or overcrowding, but because it scares her.

“I really don’t like using the regular transit, especially because I know that it’s not fully accessible,” said Gardner.

Workers’ Comp is a Right!

Posted on September 11, 2017
By Aidan Macdonald and Heidi MacFarland

For years now, injured workers and frontline advocates have been sounding the alarm that Ontario’s Workplace Safety & Insurance Board (WSIB) has been “getting its financial house in order” through austerity and cost-cutting measures. Whether it be from slashing compensation for lost wages, denying healthcare treatment and medication, or refusing to recognize mental health injuries, the cuts have come squarely on the backs of injured workers.

Guide Dogs Do Serious Work

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Many blind and partially sighted Canadians still find themselves in challenging and frustrating situations when trying to access public spaces such as cabs, B&Bs, restaurants and shopping establishments.

In all of Canada’s 13 jurisdictions, human rights legislation prohibits discriminating against a person with a disability working with a service animal. Discrimination includes denial of access to any premises to which the public would normally have access.