Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) Welcomes You!

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The AODA Clock is Ticking

There are   until a fully Accessible Ontario! Will you be compliant?

Latest Headlines

Levelling the Playing Field

The role of accommodations in academia
By: Hillary Jones, Contributor
Posted on October 16, 2017

Lakehead, like all other universities and businesses in Ontario, is required to comply with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). If you’ve had a job in Ontario at any point in your life, you’ve likely been told about the AODA along with other standard workplace trainings like WHMIS. When you’re sitting through these often monotonous training days, it can be easy to lose sight of the relevance of these policies to our daily lives. However, as midterm season is upon us, one university policy relating to the AODA may become more prominent: accommodations.

Wynne Government Still Hasn’t Appointed an Education Standards Development Committee, Fully 314 Days After Premier Wynne Pledged to Create an Education Accessibility Standard under Ontario’s Disabilities Act

and

Last Day to Complete the Wynne Government’s Online Survey about Disability Barriers in Ontario’s Education System

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities http://www.aodaalliance.org aodafeedback@gmail.com Twitter: @aodaalliance

October 16, 2017

SUMMARY

Over one third of a million students with disabilities across Ontario still face far too many disability accessibility barriers when they try to get an education in Ontario’s education system, whether they are studying in early learning programs, in schools in colleges or universities, or in job training programs. We need your help to change this. To help us, please:

Canada’s First National Accessibility Law Should Be Ready by Next Spring: Hehr

Kent Hehr speaks in Vancouver, Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2016.
Michelle McQuigge
TORONTO
The Canadian Press
October 15, 2017

The federal minister responsible for crafting Canada’s first national accessibility legislation says the law should be ready by next spring and should benefit not only people with disabilities, but their caregivers.

Kent Hehr says the timeline for the new law has shifted slightly since he took over the portfolio for sport and persons with disabilities in a recent cabinet shuffle.

Win the war on talent: Hire people with disabilities

10 Oct 2017
by Ingrid Muschta and Joe Dale

In this second part of a five-part series, experts from the Ontario Disability Employment Network explain why HR should tap this talent pool.

Local Man Wants Law to Regulate Service Dogs

“The accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 doesn’t currently include legislation that defines proper training and accreditation for service animals’ Chip Kean Certified Professional Dog Obedience Instructor
October 12, 2017
by: Linda Holmes

A professional dog obedience instructor in North Bay is petitioning the Ontario government to pass what he calls ‘much needed’ legislation regulating service dogs and their training.

Chip Kean, is also an associate certified dog behaviour consultant with the IAABC, International Association of Animal Behaviour Consultants, with the dog division. He is currently doing assessments on four potential service dogs.

Taxi Ruling a Black Mark for Justice

Times Colonist
October 11, 2017
Re: “Victoria guide-dog owner loses discrimination suit over taxi ride,” Oct. 7.

Silly me. All this time, I have believed that our justice system was based on proof.

At no time in the Graeme McCreath/Victoria Taxi case – I was present throughout both the human-rights tribunal and the
Supreme Court hearings – was any “proof” of driver allergy presented. At the original rights hearing, the driver in question
was absent (“unavailable”) and the Victoria Taxi manager neither produced nor was asked to produce medical documentation for his driver. The transcript doesn’t mention it, either.

Making a Home Accessible Can Make All the Difference as We Age

by David Nickle
City Centre Mirror

Aging at home

Med+ Home Health Care manager Ron Wiskin (left) and homeowner Sandra Sexton stands in the acessible bathroom being built at her Hendon Avenue home, on Monday, Sept. 25, that will accommodate her husband and aging parents.

Sandra and Dan Sexton are doing the kind of work on their North York home that usually comes much later in life.

Accessibility Advocates Looking to Expand the Scope of the StopGap Program in the City

‘If you have to ask then it is not accessible’
By Jonathan Juha, Postmedia News
Saturday, October 7, 2017
From left to right, Cindy Walker, Sean Beech and their children, Theodore and Hendrik; UPS employee Ron Musselman; and Roger Koert, chair of the city’s accessibility advisory committee. They are all supporters and beneficiaries of the StopGap initiative and would like to see it expand, so participating businesses leave the ramps outside during business hours.

How an Ottawa Cancer Patient is Trying to Make CHEO More Accessible for Everyone

Bruce Deachman, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: October 6, 2017

Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario(CHEO) CEO Alex Munter and leukemia patient Sarah Telford.

Just before the elevator doors opened at CHEO, Sarah Telford playfully, but pointedly, picked up a nearby yellow caution cone the kind that warn of wet floors, spills and whatnot and placed it in front of the elevator. When the doors opened, the elevator’s lone occupant, hospital CEO Alex Munter, was compelled to negotiate his way around the obstacle as he exited, no small feat considering that he was in a wheelchair.

Will the Massive New Courthouse that The Wynne Government Is Planning for the Heart of Downtown Toronto Have Sufficient Disability Accessibility?

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities

October 6, 2017

SUMMARY

Many think any new building built in Ontario must be fully accessible for people with disabilities. Sadly, neither the Ontario Building Code nor the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act ensures this. To the contrary, new buildings are now built in Ontario, even with public money, that lack proper accessibility.