You are Browsing the Category Resources

resources on issues of accessibility and the ontarians with disabilities act aoda

Ministry Affidavit, Without Appendices, Filed in Opposition to David Lepofsky’s Freedom of Information Application

(Note Appendices omitted.)
INFORMATION AND PRIVACY COMMISSIONER of ONTARIO
IN THE MATTER of Appeal Number PA 16-156 under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act

AFFIDAVIT OF JENNIFER BROWN
This affidavit was created as a result of an oral inquiry pursuant to the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). Accordingly the use of this affidavit and the information contained within it is restricted by ss. 52(9) and 52(10) of the FIPPA.

Ontario Government’s Memorandum of Argument in Opposition to David Lepofsky’s Freedom of Information Appeal

INFORMATION AND PRIVACY COMMISSIONER OF ONTARIO

IN THE MATTER of Appeal Number PA 16-156 under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act

REPLY AFFIDAVIT OF DAVID LEPOFSKY

I, David Lepofsky, CM, O. Ont., LL.B. (Osgoode Hall), LL.M. (Harvard), LL.D. (Hon. Queen’s University, University of Western Ontario, and the Law Society of Upper Canada), of the City of Toronto, affirm as follows:

David Lepofsky’s Reply Affidavit in His Freedom of Information Appeal

INFORMATION AND PRIVACY COMMISSIONER OF ONTARIO

IN THE MATTER of Appeal Number PA 16-156 under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act

REPLY AFFIDAVIT OF DAVID LEPOFSKY

I, David Lepofsky, CM, O. Ont., LL.B. (Osgoode Hall), LL.M. (Harvard), LL.D. (Hon. Queen’s University, University of Western Ontario, and the Law Society of Upper Canada), of the City of Toronto, affirm as follows:

David Lepofsky’s Reply Memorandum of Argument on His Freedom of Information Appeal

IPC Appeal PA16-156

INFORMATION AND PRIVACY COMMISSIONER OF ONTARIO

In the Matter of an Application under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. F.31 dated June 4, 2015, directed to the Ministry of Economic Development, Employment and Infrastructure, for the Disclosure of Records Regarding the Implementation and Enforcement of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Bearing Ministry File Number MEDEI 2015 -12
– and –
In the Matter of an Appeal to the Information and Privacy Commissioner from a Refusal of the Ministry to Waive Its Fee Estimate at $4,250 for Disclosing Requested Information and Records

Proposed Changes to the AODA Customer Service Standard

Last Updated: April 1 2015Article by Stringer LLP

Last year, proposed changes to the Customer Service Standard under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (“AODA”), were made available for public comment. A finalized version of these proposed changes has now been released. The purpose of many of the changes is to streamline the Customer Service Standard with the Integrated Accessibility Standard (which includes the Information and Communication Standard, the Employment Standard, the Transportation Standard and the Design of Public Spaces Standard). We have summarized some of the notable changes below.

Accessibility Laws Not Enforced:Advocates

TORONTO – Accessibility advocates say the Ontario government is falling far short of recent promises to help make the province’s businesses friendlier to people with disabilities.

Premier Kathleen Wynne wrote a letter to one advocacy group last May in which she promised the Liberals would both establish and publicize a toll-free number the public could use to report businesses that weren’t complying with accessibility laws.

Media Reports that a Guelph Children’s Play Centre Refused to Accommodate A Child with Cerebral Palsy

Another Illustration of How Far Ontario Still Must Go to Be the World Leader on Accessibility that the Wynne Government Claims We Have Become

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities

April 1, 2015

SUMMARY

1. Reports of Another Denial of Accessibility in Ontario

Disability Laws Are Overwhelming Small Employers in Ontario, Canada Says Employment Lawyer Doug MacLeod

Douglas MacLeod – MacLeod Law Firm
(PRWEB) March 31, 2015
Ontario Human Rights Code

According to Doug MacLeod, of the MacLeod Law Firm, over 50% of employment cases filed with the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal (the “Tribunal”) are commenced by disabled employees.

“The fact is most small employers do not have a good understanding of their obligations toward disabled employees,” opines MacLeod. “And I believe this problem will escalate as new obligations are imposed on employers with respect to disabled employees and more mental illness claims are filed with the Tribunal.”

Making Accessibility Standards Work for Durham Businesses

Whitby This Week
By Parvaneh Pessian

WHITBY — Catherine Anderson knows the importance of good customer service for all businesses but for some types, in particular, she says it can make all the difference in the world.

“As an insurance brokerage, all we have is customer service — we have no tangible item that we can provide to someone,” said Ms. Anderson, HR finance manager at Petley-Hare Limited, with offices in Oshawa and Bowmanville.

Amazing Media Coverage of More Toronto Restaurants Refusing Blind Customers with Guide Dogs Shows Toronto Is Not Ready to Host 2015 Pan/ParaPan American Games

Wynne Government Still Wont Strengthen, Not Weaken, Enforcement of Disabilities Act Even Though 2015 Toronto Games Are Fast Approaching March 27, 2015

SUMMARY

Over the past two weeks, Global TVs Toronto evening news has run an amazing series of seven reports by reporter Christina Stevens, on the subject of disability accessibility. Below, we set out the text of these reports. They aired on March 17, 19, 20, 23, 24, 25 and 26.

Disability Advocates Question Toronto Parapan Am Games Readiness

By Christina Stevens
Reporter Global News

Canadian athletes gearing up for the Parapan Am Games said they are looking forward to the prospect of competing on home turf.

“Potentially winning a gold medal right here at home, that’s the ultimate dream,” said Tracey Ferguson who plays wheelchair basketball.

But she is also well aware that the city could be doing better when it comes to accessibility. For example, despite living on a streetcar line, Ferguson can’t board the streetcar when it stops in front of her condo, but has to find other transportation.

Call the New Ontario Government Toll-Free Line to Report AODA Violations – We Campaigned Over Two Years to Win This Toll-Free Number!

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Ontario for All People with Disabilities

March 23, 2015

SUMMARY

The Ontario Government only has 9 years, 10 months and 8 days left to lead Ontario to become fully accessible to 1.8 million Ontarians with disabilities by 2025, as the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) requires.

Accessibility Progress Slow at Queen’s

By Sebastian Leck, Features Editor
20th March 2015

Outdated buildings raise concerns about access as campus audit begins

The hallways in Jeffrey Hall are poorly lit and lecture halls in lower levels are inaccessible to wheelchair users.

When Andrew Ashby went to give a talk on accessibility in Jeffrey Hall last year, he couldn’t enter the lecture hall in his wheelchair.

Building University-Wide IT Accessibility

While many higher ed institutions focus mostly on Web accessibility or rely on a disability resources center to serve students in need, Temple University has ramped up its accessibility efforts across the board. Here’s how. By David Raths
03/18/15

Temple University (PA) CIO Tim O’Rourke is the first to admit that in 2011 his organization didn’t give technology accessibility enough consideration. “Our whole philosophy at the time was that if we have a disabled student, we have a really good disability resources center. Students can go there and they will handle it. That was our thought process,” he said.

Campus Barriers Unacceptable

By Journal Editorial Board
Michaella Fortune
March 13, 2015

When it comes to accessibility, the bare minimum isn’t enough.

Over the next two years, campus buildings will be examined for their accessibility as part of an audit launched by Queen’s last month. After the audit is complete, the University will receive a list of recommendations for how its infrastructure can comply with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA).